Shading

Creating a convincing representational image of an object or figure in a drawing or painting is usually a matter of shading the form, using gradations of light and shadow to give the illusion of volume and dimensionality. With drawing, this is often done by hatching and cross-hatching with your pencil or chosen implement. In painting, visual depth is most often created by changing the color tone of the depicted object or form.


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