How to Draw

. Drawing Hands by M.C. Escher, lithograph, 1948.
Drawing Hands by M.C. Escher, lithograph, 1948.
.

Learn to Draw and You Will Never Be the Same

Great artists know that they can never afford to leave behind their drawing techniques if they hope to keep growing and refining their work. This goes for illustrators, architects, painters, sculptors, designers, even tattoo artists! Drawing is the backbone of art, allowing artists to not just see but record what they see in line and shading, contour and gesture.

What's most exciting about learning to draw is that there are so many avenues of pursuit. An artist can join a drawing program that is specifically tailored to drawing from life, doing quick studies and lengthier sessions to capture the movement and gesture of a live model. Or one can pursue drawing as a personal study, taking up paper and pen (or pencil) and going out into the world to simply sketch. It can allow you to learn how to draw with a variety of media as well--graphite or pencil, charcoal, pastel, pen and ink and more.

But if an artist hopes to master how to draw realistic objects and figures every time he or she puts pen to paper, there are drawing techniques that one must focus on. First comes observation and hand-eye coordination, so that we train the eye to interpret what we see in ways that make sense when we are drawing, no matter what our subject is. Then an artist can start learning how to draw figures and their actions and poses. Life drawing classes will follow, as well as drawing in a sketchbook on a frequent basis. This is the life of drawing artists--coming back to and utilizing drawing on a day-to-day basis. It is a commitment, but the rewards are learning how to draw anything!


How to Draw a Great Painting

A five-minute gesture drawing by Jon DeMartin. .
A five-minute gesture drawing by Jon DeMartin.
.
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Mastering How to Draw

Mastering Sketching Mastering Sketching: A Complete Course in 40 Lessons
Figure Drawing I: Anatomy of the Head with Dan Thompson Figure Drawing I: Anatomy of the Head
with Dan Thompson
Drawing the Complete Course Drawing:
The Complete Course

Drawing the Complete Course 2010 Drawing CD Collection
.

"One of the biggest reasons painters get into trouble is because their pictures don't have a solid foundation of accurate and expressive drawings," says New York artist Jon DeMartin.

"Drawing is an integral part of the picture-making process," DeMartin says. "It provides the opportunity to explore variations of the subject. An artist might get excited about an idea and rush headlong into the painting without adequate preparation only to discover--often much too late--that the idea couldn't be sustained through the entire process. By taking the time to execute preparatory drawings, an artist can carefully consider and distill the ideas and thereby make better creative decisions."

The best part of DeMartin's drawing workshops is that they give students a range of approaches to figurative drawing, each of which can help with particular aspects of picture-making. For example, he has students start each day with quick gesture drawings that emphasize the spontaneous, linear aspects of recording an active pose in a line drawing.

"Short poses from one to 45 minutes tend to be more about line and gesture, and long ones (one hour or more) are about shape and volume," he explains. "Because of time constraints, any extensive modeling with values is difficult to do, so the more ways I can make line express volume, the better." When artists spend hours or days working from the same pose, their drawings become analyses of values related to forms turning from the light to the shadow.

"Both of these approaches to drawing the figure can be beneficial to painters, but they can also lead to their own problems," DeMartin says. "Artists who only make short gesture drawings often produce stylized images that are formulaic rather than honest responses to individual models. Conversely, artists who only make drawings that take months to complete often end up with mechanically accurate observations that lack emotional content. By combining the two approaches, the artist has a better chance of being able to make both quick evaluations of the way figures move in space as well as accurate observations that evoke the essence of the person being drawn."

DeMartin recommends that artists use different drawing materials but the same posture while making these two types of drawings. "Drawing should be done from a standing position with one's arm extended so the motion comes from the shoulder, not just the wrist," he indicates. "Artists should be able to see both the drawing surface and the model within their field of vision."

DeMartin explains that there is not just one recommended approach to drawing or painting. The crucial thing for artists to remember is that some amount of drawing will help in selecting the elements of a picture, establishing the composition of lines and values, and resolving potential problems.

Source: Adapted from an article by Steve Doherty

 

Drawing Techniques: Line and Shadow

. DeMartin (figure drawing, above) recommends finding and emphasizing the rhythmic actions in a drawing.
DeMartin (figure drawing, above)
recommends finding and emphasizing
the rhythmic actions in a drawing.
.

Here are a few tips from artist and instructor Jon DeMartin for when learning to draw with line and contour or shadow and tone.

Line: The principal objective in making quick sketches is to capture rhythmic actions. Find the action before the contours because without that sense of motion the drawing will lose its rhythmic flow. If time allows, gradually introduce structure by conceptualizing the orientation of the head, rib cage, and pelvis in space using vertical and horizontal median lines. The focus is more on the skeleton of the body than on the muscles.

Shadow: Shadows guide the artist in comparing the other values that are in light, so put those in first. Create one flat value for the lights (the white of the paper) and one flat value for the shadows with hatched lines that make a light tone. Value is not a concern, only the graphic interpretation of the shadow pattern. It is important to recognize which forms are in shadow and which aren't because artists often mistake dark values in the light for shadows.

Line: Lines describing the features can cross over the body parts as they emphasize the flow of the forms and the relationship of one shape to another. If an arm crosses over the body, for example, the artist should draw the continuous lines of the body first and then draw the arm over that section of the body. The point is to capture the action and contour and let the subtleties come later.

Shadow: Learning to draw or develop the shadows means working in an additive way, building up layers of charcoal. First rub in an even, flat mass of shadows and then use a charcoal stump to melt the shadows into the paper. This serves as a nice juxtaposition to the values in the light, which are more spontaneously drawn with hatching. On longer poses, the drawing's three-dimensional illusion is expressed primarily through values of light and dark. The planes on the form that turn away from the light source darken as they approach the shadow line. These are the value gradations on the form that convey the illusion of roundness. The rounder the form, the more the gradations spread out.

Source: Adapted from an article by Steve Doherty on Jon DeMartin's drawing techniques.

 

Learn to Draw Edges

. Men Walking in a Field by Georges Seurat, 1883, Conté, 12 x 91/8. Collection Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland.
Men Walking in a Field by Georges Seurat, 1883,
drawing, 12 x 9 1/8. Collection Baltimore
Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland.
.

Contour lines are a useful lie a draftsman uses to indicate the edge of a form in a line drawing. In truth, we don't see a line marking the edge of a face, we merely see where the form curves away from view. Drawing a solid line on the edge of elements suggests shapes, not forms--a draftsman must take care to imply the other planes not visible from the viewer's vantage point. Plus, simply concentrating on the contour lines can distract an artist from the important task of portraying the gesture of the model, which usually radiates from the interior of a figure. For this and for other practical reasons, an artist's handling of edges is of great importance if a drawing is to be convincing.

Curves are hard to accurately render. Many drawing instructors recommend using only straight lines for edges, softening them into curves where necessary later. If you think this is a beginner's crutch, consider how Rubens, a master draftsman, used this method.

Edges do much of the work in suggesting depth. A thick line brings the shape forward and a light, thin line can indicate a plane receding into the background. But edges aren't just about lines. In more tonal pieces, a harder edge and a marked contrast between planes create a form that is closer to the viewer than one with a softer, lighter look. This is essential for cast shadows--a shadow is sharpest at the point where it touches the object casting it, and it diffuses as the shadow lengthens away from the object. In his drawing, Men Walking in a Field, Seurat made the closer figure move forward in the picture plane by increasing the contrast between darker planes and lighter planes and by using harder edges on this figure.

In his book Mastering Drawing the Human Figure From Life, Memory, Imagination, Jack Faragasso points out that one should always be aware that the most important edges are those that indicate light and dark patterns. He uses as an example the thick ruffled collars that often appear in Rembrandt's paintings--the important edges in such collars are not the individual twists and folds, but rather the edge of the shadow as the collar moves into the light. Effectively depicting that line will do more to make the ruff convincing than a hundred detailed lines.

 

. Nude Male Kneeling, Holding Fabric in Right Hand by Jean-Antoine Watteau, 1715-16.
Nude Male Kneeling, Holding Fabric in Right Hand
by Jean-Antoine Watteau, 1715-16.
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Where to Position Your Drawing on the Page

You can always place the subject of your line drawing or contour drawing smack dab in the middle of the page. It makes a strong statement and, in some cases, most clearly expresses how you want the viewer to experience the piece. But placing the subject matter elsewhere in the composition can make the background work for you and create intriguing tensions, suggest narrative, and guide the eye to the focal point in a more subtle way.

The French term mise en page (literally translated, "placement on page") is sometimes used in reference to this concept, but the idea has its roots in much earlier history--artists' consideration of this aspect of composition is generally thought to have originated in the Renaissance. By the age of Watteau, its significance in an artist's approach was firmly established, and today it's nearly inconceivable that a working artist would neglect its careful handling.

Our natural tendency may be to place the subject matter in the center of the composition, giving it the attention it deserves in the middle of our "stage," but this does not accurately reflect how we usually view the world. Unless we are extremely close to our subject, there is a great deal of information reaching us in our peripheral vision. We experience everything in context, and this context impacts how we interpret the focal point. As drawers we must fight what feels automatic and truly observe the entire scene to accurately describe the tableaux.

Periklis Pagratis, the chairman of foundation studies at the Savannah College of Art and Design, teaches his students drawing basics and beyond, including the idea that when designing a composition, they should think of the subject as Medusa's head--don't look at it directly or you will turn to stone (or your drawing will, at least). The negative space around the subject should play an essential role in your composition. There will be plenty of time to closely pore over the subject itself when the time comes for rendering it.

Flip through any art book and you are sure to see wonderful examples of compelling mise en page. Examine any painting or drawing in which the focal point is pointedly placed away from the center of the composition, then imagine how differently the piece would work if the subject matter were dead center on the page. You will readily see how the best artists make mise en page work effectively for them.  

Source: Adapted from an article by Bob Bahr

 


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  • Oh my gosh, the last couple of weeks have flown by! But isn't that always the way it is this time of year? I hope you have savored the build-up to the holidays with time with friends and family, but I do hope you've been able to eke out time for
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  • It was a collection of drawings, of course. My good friend from grad school, Amanda, made me a handmade miniature book filled with calligraphy and fun sketches of our time together in school. The cover is light blue and the pages are accordion-style, one folding over the next. The book is made from basic
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  • During family get-togethers when my younger cousins were much smaller, they would always want to draw together or for me to draw pictures for them. Oh, man, they set the bar high! Princesses in gowns, cars and trucks, monsters—my little cousin Austin once asked for a galloping horse that took an
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  • No apologies from me for that attempt at sensationalism (I would have written tabloid headlines in another life). The truth is I was lucky enough to sit down and chat with artist and instructor C.W. Mundy, who is generous with both his time and his talents. We chatted about his upbringing, strategies
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  • The Girl with the Wineglass by Johannes Vermeer, 1659. We are in a social time of the year. Holiday parties, galas, end-of-the-year revelries—there are celebrations galore. What’s great about such occasions for artists, in addition to seeing
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  • There is great interest today in reviving traditional methods and techniques of painting. Much of this interest comes about from the loss or absence of these methods in the teaching curricula of many art schools and university art programs. We have informally
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  • I used to think so romantically about Monet, Pissarro, and the other Impressionists. Not romantic like Manet is so dreamy; romantic as in idealizing this particular group of painters—thinking they stepped outside of their studios and, snap, Impressionism just happened. Veneration can sometimes
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  • The Lantern Bearers by Maxfield Parrish, 1908, oil on canvas board, 40 x 32. I have a confession to make: I've never glazed an oil painting. The process intimidates me a bit—creating luminosity and an inner glow on canvas is no easy feat—and
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  • I love how artists can create worlds all their own—using the hills and valleys of a beautiful landscape or the sensuous curves of the human form. But that’s not all artists are capable of doing. Centuries ago, great artists like Michelangelo and Bernini didn’t just build worlds in their
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  • How many times do we promise ourselves that we'll do something "one day", both in everyday life and our art, yet somehow never find the time? But if you make a list of these and pick one to do each month, and are willing to grab an opportunity
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  • You know how life can sometimes speed by and at other times crawl along at a snail’s pace? Well, drawing is that way too. There are drawing techniques that are incredibly labor intensive and deliberate, then there are others that are quick and unplanned.
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  • I knew we were in trouble when I opened the car door and brown water started flooded in. ‘Shut the door!' shouted Vanessa. "Mon Dieu, Mon Dieu!" muttered our French driver, holding her head in her hands. The car had stalled. The small
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  • Artist Quang Ho seeks out a natural, effortless pose with his portrait painting models. Photos by Manuel Rodriguez . I'm a lounger by nature. Why stand when I can sit? Why sit when I can curl up on the nearest comfy couch? This has made my posture
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  • If I'd been born a century earlier, I think I would have loved menageries. They sound quite romantic, don't they? And it probably would have been the only time I ever stood face to face with exotic animals from distant places. A successful horse
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  • I'm sure many of you are aware of the Spanish living legend Antonio López García, but I'm ashamed to say I was not familiar with his artwork until recently. And as with any new discovery, once you become aware of a new person, place
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  • Fantasy art guru and top-notch artist James Gurney is a font of knowledge when it comes to so many aspects of drawing and painting . Whether you are into fantasy images or tend toward more realist compositions, Gurney has techniques and methods dealing
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  • As you progress with your studies of the human body and the ways of drawing anatomy , you will keep coming back to a very few of the basic principles. It is hard to think of them when one picks up the pencil and that is the reason for practicing drawing
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  • I don't think any of you know how often I brag about you and the great work you show off in the Artist Daily Member Gallery. Recently I had several colleagues looking over my shoulder at the computer screen as I showed them the pastel drawings of
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  • Hollywood Note: Thursday Night at the ***-and-Bull, It's the Maid's Night Out by Thomas Hart Benton, drawing 1937. A few years ago, I left Manhattan and went to Manhattan—Kansas, that is. I was a bit wary as I landed in the midst of a harsh
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  • I have found that toning my support, whether canvas or paper or board, is something I often do now. I’m showing two works to illustrate the difference between toning and not toning.
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  • Jacqueline Kamin paints with a sculptural sensibility that isn’t at all foreign to her practice. Earlier in her career she spent time as a bronze bust sculptor. “Working with sculpture is a lot of fun,” Kamin says. “It is very tactile and organic, but it takes a toll physically
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  • Seated Muse by James Langley , a Foundation Studies professor at SCAD. The Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) believes certain artistic skills and techniques are fundamental for all students, whether these students happen to be filmmakers, architects, fashion designers, animators, or fine artists
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  • I typically don’t carry around a sketchbook, but during this time of year I could make an exception. There is so much going on, and it seems like everywhere I look there’s a composition waiting to be found. Just yesterday I went for a walk, and the sight of a little girl tugging demandingly
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  • Bob Bahr talks about his favorite pencil and asks readers for their opinions.
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  • There’s one thing and one thing alone that makes for a successful tonal drawing : seeing masses rather than outlines. Lines are for flow charts, architectural blueprints, and driving on the right side of the road. To a certain extent I am kidding—there are some incredible draftsmen who work
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  • Whiskey Creek (Spring) By Kate Ha rding, 2008, found leather garments, thread, grommets, and steel hooks, 54 x 35. One of the things I love about the artistic process is that we all share the need to put our creative energy into practice, we do it in so many different ways, and yet we usually have a
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  • My pencil drawing, Alley , was the result of a 40-minute pose that I did a few weeks ago. Let’s get right down to the business of drawing. I attend life drawing classes twice a week at Spring Street Studios, and for many years now, I’ve been
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  • This past summer provided several opportunities for me and my family to pack up the van and head out on the highway. But as the mileage on the odometer increased, so did my chances of making a wrong decision along the way. It helped to have a GPS to point
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  • Anting by George Boorujy, 2011, ink on paper, 55 1/2 x 108. That's always the statement that rings in my head when I focus on how to draw animals because in my mind, drawing animals is all about physical appearance and movement. A bear, an owl, and
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  • Pivotal moments in my life have often-to take a line from Ernest Hemingway-come "gradually, then suddenly." Nothing appears to be on the horizon, but then a few things fall into place, then a few more, and suddenly I'm in a whole new situation. It's often the same for artists who begin
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  • Drawing with ink takes the precision of a master draftsman and the skill of a watercolorist handling a fluid medium. When I was in school I was completely captivated by the silky dark lines of one of the most famous pen and ink artists, Aubrey Beardsley
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  • How does one draw caricatures? Believe it or not that is one of the most commonly asked questions that I get about learning to draw. Everyone wants to know the secret and I tell them there is no one secret. In fact, there are THREE!!! The first is simple
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  • I judge a successful cityscape painting by whether or not the architecture, the weather, and the figures—everything in the painting—combine to transport me somewhere different. If that happens and the barrier between my reality and the painted alternative gets a little blurry, letting me
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  • For Renaissance Italians, great art was primarily about disegno , or drawing—but not just the process of drafting in itself. Disegno encompassed the intellectual aspect of an artwork in conjunction with technique. This shift in focus raised the status of the visual arts, which had been until that
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  • "I'm going down to Cuba to see my friends Down where the rhythm never ends And no problem is too difficult to solve Yeah, times are tough down there it's true But you know they're going to make it through They make such continuous use
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  • A few of my artistic heroes get worse than no respect. They get anonymity. Jacques le Moyne de Morgues, Philip Gidley King, James Cook, Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres, John James Audubon—all were artistic adventurers, and most of them are virtually unknown.
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  • In the beginning, we all come to discover art in different ways. Perhaps a teacher in school handed you a small set of paints and said, "Try this," or a friend of the family was an art director and encouraged you to learn how to draw , or perhaps
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  • When I look at Artemisia Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes , I always focus on Judith’s clenched fist in the foreground; to me, it reinforces the physical violence of the scene. Viewing Auguste Rodin’s Burghers of Callais I gain a heightened awareness of my own body, as if I too
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  • They say when infants (or young children) fall down, they look up to their mother or father, to see how she or he reacts. More often than not, a parent will have an anxious and frightened facial expression--"Oh no, my baby is hurt!"--which,
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  • In order to understand what we face concerning how to properly draw the shoulder girdle, we will need to endure a bit of anatomy. Now it's not going to be a comprehensive coverage of the shoulder. We did all of that in the lecture on the shoulder
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  • Woman in Repose by Sherrie McGraw, sanguine and white conte, 10 x 15 1/2. Interacting with so many artists and writing about their work makes me think a lot about the kind of art I would personally like to make. With all the high-caliber paintings, collages
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  • You’re out on location, enjoying a bit of plein air painting or sketching, then all of a sudden you realize you haven't the right color for an element in your composition. Nor will the colors you do have mix to produce it. You’ve two options
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  • I don’t have pets but I really love drawing animals because it allows me to focus on a subject matter that is totally different from what I’m used to. Animals’ bodies vary dramatically from bird to reptile to mammal, and that means I
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  • Robert Johnson strikes the perfect balance between master artist and down-to-earth mentor, supporting his students while pushing them to create the best works that they can. At a recent three-day workshop sponsored by The Art League School in Alexandria, Virginia, Johnson led students through the stages
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  • Gaining exposure and recognition for one’s work starts with putting finished pieces in the public and critical eye. This can mean participating in local community shows or full-fledged exhibitions, entering competitions, and hanging pieces in galleries. It is an exciting prospect, but it can also
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  • Head drawing and the ideals of proportions have changed dramatically over the centuries. However, one thing has remained the same--a secret system of rules that few artists even know about, which are universally truthful and, when closely studied, can
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  • If the eyes are the windows to the soul, then a painter needs to get them right when creating a portrait. But the "oval, circle, dot" anatomy of the eye that we all first learned as children is far removed from how to give the illusion of a real eye in your work. Here are a few tips about painting
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  • Courtesy R&F Handmade Paints After spending all day sitting at my desk, click-click-clicking away on my computer, I savor getting out and being active, especially if I’m learning a new activity or skill. It’s the difference between reading
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  • In last Friday's post featuring artist-instructor Kerry Dunn, we explored some of the opportunities and challenges that an extensive color palette offers. On the flipside, Bulgarian-born painter Ignat Ignatov understands how an artist can benefit from the use of a limited palette. For a time Ignatov
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  • Sketching on location is definitely one of the most powerful sources of information, joy, and inspiration for an artist. At least for me. I love to paint cityscapes--the buildings, roads, cars, and people. To collect ideas for my paintings I just walk
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  • Kevin Macpherson is a renowned artist and instructor with 30 years of plein air painting experience. For newcomers, painting en plein air means literally, painting “in the open air,” and is the genre associated with painting outdoors. In 1996, Macpherson challenged himself to what I’d
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  • The Battle of San Romano by Paolo Uccello, c. 1435-55, tempera on wood. I'd have to answer with, "I'm not so sure." For me, studying Italian Renaissance and Baroque art meant spending a lot of time talking about how awesome linear perspective
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  • “If the drawing is wrong, the fresco is wrong.” With that, master craftsman and fresco instructor Walter O’Neill began a fresco workshop that I attended a few weeks ago at the Morgan Library & Museum, in New York City. Fresco painting has become somewhat of a lost art over the centuries
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  • "Again and again I've taken quick glances and then for some reason I've got to sit before a picture waiting and it's opened up like one of those Japanese flowers that you put into water and something I thought wasn't worth more than
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  • Jeremiah by Michelangelo Buonarroti, Sistine Chapel, 1511. Rondanini Pieta by Michelangelo, 1564. I think the affinity that I have for art is definitely inborn. Art isn’t something I grew up with or was tutored in, so when I stumbled upon it on
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  • The leg is not a straight line. A common misconception when drawing this limb is the idea that a leg that is not bent forms a straight line. This is far from the reality. One of the ways that will help with understanding the body and, therefore, the ability
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  • We have been enjoying the book, The Artist's Eyes: Vision and the History of Art , by ophthalmologists Michael Marmor and James G. Ravine. One of our favorites among the many fascinating subjects they cover, is the eerie phenomenon or illusion in
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  • Collage materials can add visual interest and texture to a painting surface. Artwork by Misty Mawn. When I feel creatively blocked or bored, I revert back to childhood and start to play. Doodling, writing stream-of-conscious text, or painting loosely
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  • I won't lie when I tell you that looking at artist sketchbooks is one of the things I love to do most. And I've found that the pages that I linger over are usually filled with landscape drawing sketches. It is like I can look at the drawing and
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  • I wanted to share a blog about ArtistsNetwork.tv from our publisher and editorial director Jamie Markle. It's a great resource--and a great offer, so do read it over and, as always, enjoy!! Fellow Artist: If you have a passion for painting like I
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  • In Vladimir Nabokov’s novel Invitation to a Beheading , the pencil is described as the “enlightened descendant of the index finger.” That sounds about right, especially considering the pride of place that artists often afford their pens, brushes, and pencils. For many artists, however
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  • "Looking down on empty streets, all she can see are the dreams all made solid are the dreams all made real all of the buildings, all of those cars were once just a dream in somebody's head" --Peter Gabriel - Mercy Street Anyone can imagine
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  • The centerpiece painting for my show "Venus Apocalypse" at Dacia Gallery this June is the eponymous painting shown here. This painting was the third in a set of Venuses. I shared about the first two, "Sleeping Venus" and "Venus
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  • I’m from a card-playing family, so when it comes to discussions about artists using reference photographs, I always think in terms of watching for a “tell.” Like in poker—where players’ subtle mannerisms can reveal whether
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  • There are a number of misconceptions that I held about drawing and painting when I started taking art classes at Studio Incamminati, among them that really good artists don't have to make corrections to their work. Various instructors here have corrected
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  • Brooklyn-based artist Allison Maletz doesn't want to use watercolor in a traditional way. Although her work is representational and often figure-based, exploring themes of human connection and the quirky, often dysfunctional, "average American family," she refuses be bound by any rules
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  • I’ve always thought of a painter’s drawings as his or her diary. A finished painting is the confident, public face shown to the world, but drawings read like journal entries, where you can see an artist’s preoccupations, struggles, moments of exploration, and sense of play.
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  • What makes an object look three-dimensional in a painting or a drawing? We use a variety of cues to give us this information: light and shadow, contrast, pattern, color, texture, scale, temperature and value, usually in combinations. Our ability to measure
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  • I'm always surprised-and, okay, a little peeved-when my mention of an arts background is often met with a puzzled look followed by the somewhat skeptical question, "What do you do with that?" The truth is there's a lot to do with that, especially now-at a time when images are all around
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  • Let's talk about common mistakes we all make because if you are making these mistakes and are told to look out for them, it will speed up your progress considerably. I am using examples of my student's drawings from the masterclass I teach to
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  • William Zorach is a well-known 20th-century sculptor who participated in the Armory Show of 1913 and whose work is held in numerous public collections. But as his career unfolded and he found his way as a sculptor, watercolors were always part of his practice.
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  • I love summer because I’m always on the go. It’s the best time of year to travel, and I just can’t seem to say no to any outing or adventure that comes my way. Want to take a road trip through the Carolinas, Court? I’m there. A holiday to Chicago? Sign me up. A vacation in California’s
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  • For the past year, I have been developing new work for my upcoming show at Dacia Gallery in NYC. Dacia is a small gallery on the Lower East Side, and the intimate size gave me the opportunity to put together a body of work with a narrowly focused theme
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  • Not too many years ago, San Francisco based artist Sadie J. Valeri was an aspiring figure painter stuck in a still life studio. She had a good deal of time on her hands to hone her painting and drawing skills, but her workspace was less than 100 square feet. The space constraints, plus the costs of hiring
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  • When I went away to college I took a token from each of my loved ones. There was a Frankie Laine CD from my dad, a grungy Pearl Jam T-shirt from my brother, and a charcoal portrait of my mom that was made on the boardwalk of Virginia Beach when she was
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  • When I'm hiking or walking on the beach, my attention span is really short. I flit from activity to activity, sight to sight, just trying to take it all in. That's why pastel painting is a perfect fit for me when I want to create art outdoors
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  • Each day, people from all over the globe travel to Paris to visit the most famous oil painting in the world, the Mona Lisa . Many are just curious, and want to see the real thing for themselves. Some admire the famous enigmatic smile, the perfect proportions
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  • Almost any artist will tell you that there's a certain appeal to working outdoors that can't be found anywhere else. With spring in full swing, many of us have left our studios for our porches, backyards, and beyond. To celebrate the season and all of the landscape art being made, here are 10
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  • There's really nothing quite like a deadline to get us in gear, am I right? I mean, when art is your passion but real life is your reality , sometimes it is hard to find ways to integrate studio time into our lives on a consistent basis. But that
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  • I want to say a few things about massing. There are a few basic rules in figure drawing that will deliver results, but underlying them all is massing. If you cannot master massing, no matter how much you know of all the other elements of drawing, there
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  • Painting the people and places one sees every day can be either a mind-numbing trial or an impetus for creativity that just happens to be homeward bound. For New Jersey-based artist Michael de Brito--who has spent the last several years painting family members and friends in familiar surroundings, such
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  • I just finished a very interesting commission. I've shared my oil painting, Pandora , on Artist Daily before. It was one of the central paintings from my 2012 exhibit at Forbes Gallery. I got a lot of positive feedback on that painting--and then got
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  • One of the best conversations I’ve had about art wasn’t with an artist. It wasn’t with an art historian, curator, or gallery owner, either. It was with a mechanical engineer. We went from discussing his latest design project to the artfulness of historical blueprints to Leonardo’s
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  • Human figure drawing, especially life drawing from a model, is one of the most rewarding ways of practicing art because it can enhance your abilities in ways that are both practical and inspirational. It's practical in that creating figure drawings develops skills that will serve you again and again
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  • Seeing a painting or drawing progress from beginning to end allows the finished artwork to be understood as a series of discrete steps leading to a virtuosic whole. During a recent tour of the Grand Central Academy (GCA), in New York City, I observed instructor Joshua LaRock developing a drawing of Michelangelo's
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  • The patterns of nature inspire our artwork. One of the most fascinating recent discoveries is the intimate relationship between the patterns found in nature's tiniest creations to the patterns found in her broadest, most sweeping productions. The
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  • For just a few seconds, I thought that watercolor painting pencils were some kind of April Fool's come lately prank. I mean, everything I think of and know about watercolor painting is that it is fluid and kind of uncontrollable. In a pencil, how
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  • Sustain Your Art Business With a Sound Studio Practice, Starting with Warm-Ups When I think of a warm-up, it is usually a sweaty business in which you raise your heart rate, get your muscles loosened up, and stretch a bit. Warm-up exercises for artists
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  • Can you imagine figuring out how to draw a face—the same face—350 times or more, and making each portrait drawing different and as compositionally sound and interesting as if you had made only one? Quite a task, yet Italian designer, sculptor
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  • Last week we talked about parallel parking a car -- or in my case, not parallel parking the thing -- and how, if we don't know a specific skill, we can frequently compensate by doing things another way. It's not easy drawing the human figure accurately
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  • Drawing is a fundamental skill for artists, emphasis on "skill." That means there are basic drawing rules and approaches that work, including these six tips on how to draw anything accurately. Delmonico Building by Charles Sheeler, 1926, lithograph
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  • I'm a people pleaser. I innately want to make those around me happy and satisfied. So when an Artist Daily reader came to me wanting to know more about how to draw flowers, I wanted to come back to them with a resource that could really get to the
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  • What makes an object look three-dimensional? We use a variety of cues to give us this information: light and shadow, contrast, pattern, color, texture, scale, temperature and value, usually in combinations. Our ability to measure these different parameters
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  • Okay, I'm going to share with you my dirty little secret: I can't parallel park a car. Well, I can parallel park a car as long as I've got three blank spaces, in a pinch two, and it helps that I drive a Honda Fit. But for the most part I'm
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  • I own up to the fact that I am drawn to the portraits artist Jenny Morgan creates because they are unconventional. Yet they capture qualities of the human face and our other human qualities in ways that read very true and lifelike. I like them because
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  • Continuing the long line of intimists from Vermeer to Vuillard, Mark Karnes makes an alluring world out of the quietest aspects of his domestic life. Like all great painters of the near-at-hand, Karnes' work reminds us that beauty is to be found everywhere
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  • Every year, we invite pastel artists to enter their work into our annual Pastel 100 competition, now in its 14th year. And every year, we receive thousands of pastel paintings. I am always stunned by the fantastic variety of the work and the extraordinary
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  • Certainly, there are pitfalls to making paintings from photos . One problem occurs when an artist thinks that a photo is magic and that he or she can turn a photo into a painting with a snap of the fingers. It isn't that easy, of course. And even
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  • The Clubfoot Boy by Jusepe de Ribera, oil on canvas, 1642. Art...has the power to make any spot on earth the living center of the universe; and unlike science, which often gives us the illusion of understanding things we really do not understand, it helps
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  • I am usually heartened when I hear disagreements about matters of art and technique. Maybe I'm just combative that way, but more likely, I think I take such debates as a sign that there are more artists coming to the table, that the field is growing
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  • When I say "the perfect blend," I feel a little bit like I am describing a gourmet coffee flavor, but there really is a perfect blend that exists in pastel painting. For me, the crème de la crème of pastel drawings combines a certain
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  • "A line is a path that can offer an interesting and varied journey, rhythmic and with occasional, pleasurable surprises. Thus is one tempted to take the journey again. " -Krome Barratt, Logic and Design: In Art, Science, and Mathematics Creating
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  • Do you ever lose yourself in creating pencil sketches and discover, when you "wake up," that you've drawn objects or people or places that have personal meaning to you or ideas you've been subconsciously toying with? Drawing sketches
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  • This issue features a special section on colored pencil —we consider the advantages of the medium and look at the work of several contemporary artists doing wonderful things with their materials. We also look at ways that artists can use drawings to prepare for work in other media.
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  • Sometimes I get list fever, and this is one of those days. I have made a grocery list, a list of gifts I need to buy, and a list of artists I want to look up. The only list I haven't made yet is my list of lists! But lists are great things, especially
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  • Whenever I go to the doctor and get my finger pricked, I'm always surprised at how much it hurts--at how sensitive the tips of our fingers are. Yet at the same time, they are so utilitarian. Judith Ann Braun's work uses both these qualities of
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  • I don't think the failure or success of a drawing has to do with the drawing ideas that the artist starts with. He or she could choose pretty much anything and make a go of it, don't you think? It also doesn't depend on whether the artist
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  • In a recent article I wrote, a reader commented about the "pathetic efforts" she/he, and other artists, make sometimes in the process of creating art. I understand what the reader is saying, at the same time that I vehemently oppose the concept
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  • I have a painter-friend who is gearing up to do a major work with figures, but she feels a bit rusty about painting a model in all his or her glory. To help prepare herself, she's set up a series of life-drawing sessions so that she can spend a bit
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  • Here are 7 basic considerations to take into account when designing your composition for a drawing or painting, all having to do somewhat with the importance of shapes. 1. Be aware of static shapes; for example, the completely dark, opened doorway or
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  • Sometimes I can forget how good it feels just practicing drawing techniques. Simple things, like working on proportion and scale and line weight can feel so rewarding if you give yourself the time to really savor them when learning to draw. Mostly this
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  • In all the painting or drawing dabbling I've done, there is always a definitive moment that divides my experiences into "before" and "after." It's the moment I realize I don't have to worry about going back because every
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  • The more I think about and experiment with drawing techniques, the more I understand the extraordinary range of opportunity that drawing offers the artist, whether the drawing is intended as a preliminary sketch to a painting or a drawing in its own right
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  • I'll admit that in the past I have been guilty of thinking of colored pencil art as colorful and bright and not necessarily able to be coupled with serious subjects or moody narratives. But that was my own bias. As I've spent time looking at sketchbooks
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  • Susan Lyon's figure drawings truly set her apart artistically and are the foundation and preparation for all she creates as an oil painter. If you ask her why, it is a drawing's immediacy, directness, and drama that are the ideal conduits for
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  • It is interesting to investigate how we make creative decisions, and how so many of those decisions are based on our perceptions of, or fantasies about, how others will feel toward our work. Perhaps this is quite normal for social beings used to negotiating
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  • When it comes to being able to draw with a paintbrush, no one can touch Rembrandt. He was able to turn abstract brushstrokes into forms with texture, weight, and liveliness. He could turn two swipes of a painting brush loaded with white paint into the
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  • I love stumbling upon facts about artists that make me rediscover them and consider their process in a whole new light. That's the kind of moment I had when I discovered that Roy Lichtenstein, the king of Benday dots and comic-book narratives, loved
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  • With so much interest in plein air painting these days, it's easy to overlook how important drawing skills can be to the landscape painting artist. Fundamentally, drawing is both a way of seeing and a way of knowing a subject. If you can draw it,
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  • I recently had an Emeril Lagasse moment--and it happened when I mixed pastels with water for the first time. Three Sunflowers on Blue by Jimmy Wright, pastel painting, 30 x 41. A while back, I confided that I wanted to start an earnest study and exploration
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  • Recently I have been sketching on the train and in the train station. It took me quite a while to get up the courage to do it, and so far it is going well, though the process is different than when I am drawing in class. When I sketch in the train station
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  • The style of artwork I make often falls under the general heading of realism, and this oil painting is a case-in-point of why I struggle with the term. First, here's a bit of background on the source of my angst. In the atelier system, students are
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  • I was recently on the train with a friend who caught the attention of an artist sitting across from us. She started drawing my pal. We were thrilled! It was an exciting moment as we watched my friend's face appear on the paper in front of us. As the
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  • When I paint figures the work seems to matter more--I find that I'm more focused on the process than when I am just drawing fancifully from my head or creating a still life. And by "matter" I mean that the intensity is ratcheted up just
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  • I'm not qualified to tell anyone what they should or should not do, but if I was to give us--and by "us" I mean those artistically inclined individuals who love painting, drawing, and mixed media art --a universal homework assignment, it
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  • Our goal is to make every issue of Drawing magazine as informative and inspiring as possible. In order to achieve this, we need you to share your thoughts about the publication. Before February 28, please take our reader survey, where you can tell us
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  • In figure drawing and painting, knowing the ins and outs of the human body is essential. There's no way around that fact, and honing our skills with anatomy drawing helps us understand and truly see the body more accurately than any other endeavor
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  • We are thrilled to announce that the Grand Prize winner in Drawing magazine's Shades of Gray competition is Joseph Crone, of Indianapolis. Congratulations, Joseph! The winning image will be featured alongside the artist's other work in a feature
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  • One of the most daunting challenges artists face is instilling a sense of movement and action into a drawing or painting. Just as artists must conjure a three-dimensional image on a two-dimensional picture plane, they must also create the sense of time passing in a medium that ultimately does not move
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  • I'm an artistic omnivore to be sure, but there is really nothing I love more and respond to more than pencil drawings. I know, the humble pencil and paper seems so simple, so basic. But what some forego and forget as too elementary, I see as essential
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  • I was doubly lucky last week because I had a thoughtful discussion with a great artist, Patricia Watwood, about how most notable representational art is "real" and about what happens to artists when they are faced with stepping outside that
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  • Often when I'm busy with teaching and working and tending to my family and professional commitments, when every second of my time is taken up and I just can't spare a moment to draw as so many of us are during the holidays, then an opportunity
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  • It goes without saying that making art is not a creative process that only goes one way. No matter what cleaned-up biographies or histories I've read about great American painters or Old Masters, I know that there is no neat and straightforward path
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  • For a drawing to be successful, you've got to start off choosing the right drawing surface. No matter how great the drawing ideas you have or the drawing art skills you bring to bear in the process, if you aren't pairing surface and implement
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  • That sounds gross, but in the hands of contemporary painter Alex Kanevsky, it's not. As a classically trained artist, Kanevsky's painting techniques and skills are strong. But the way he chooses to paint--in patches and broad swaths that lend
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  • Another slice of my personal humble pie is the fact that I'm pretty bad at math in general and downright horrible at geometry in particular. You'd never ever find me trying to use these skills when making art--or so I thought. But when I was gleaning
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  • Never mind that "the frenzies" is not technically a real medical condition. What I mean is that during the holidays, I feel like we can all get a bit frenzied. There are parties to attend and host, events to go to, cards to send, gifts to wrap
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  • Foreshortening! For me, it is truly the stuff of nightlights and pulling the covers over my head. I've struggled really hard to learn how to draw foreshortened objects and figures, because my mind constantly overrules my eye, saying, "That can't
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  • When you think about it, you probably have a personal symbolism—objects or colors or landscape features that hold special meaning for you. These ideas can develop from our personal experiences, our culture, or books we've read. In the comic
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  • Ever wondered where Da Vinci found the time to create all his masterpieces? Alongside his fine art painting he managed to dabble as a scientist, geologist, architect, mathematician, engineer, and anatomist with a bit of aeronautical design thrown in for
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  • The winning drawings have been selected in the Shades of Gray competition and this weekend winners were notified via e-mail. We would like to extend a great thanks to everyone who entered their drawings--we received hundreds of strong entries, and it
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  • I suggested in my previous blog that the difference between an excellent draftsperson versed in anatomy, perspective, elements of drawing and all the other disciplines needed to produce a realistic, believable figure drawing and an artist is that the
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  • I have tried hard the past few years--with mixed success--to avoid answering the question, "How are you doing?" with the response "Really busy." Some blame our cultural "time shortage" on the clock, progress, and our obsession
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  • How does brush sizing work and where do you start? Have you every ordered some new brushes online, feeling pretty confident they'll be the perfect size for your latest oil on canvas creation? After all you spent all afternoon researching them. Only
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  • Uh, I think I may have stumbled into an artist's dream! The Artist's Network Annual Holiday Sweepstakes is going on right now, offering awesome art prizes from the best painting and drawing product makers and service providers around. Rosemary
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  • How to let go of small brush addiction so your paintings can move on to become more gestural If you lost all of your brushes, which one would you miss the most? For me, it's a 12 year old Filbert bristle brush that has lost its shape, has unruly hairs
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  • Our best efforts are spent on timeless principles before specific techniques. -- Juliette Aristides, Lessons in Classical Drawing Juliette Aristides, artist and author. I'm Juliette Aristides, an artist, educator, and author based in Seattle, Washington
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  • Greetings all! I'm making my way out of a food-induced coma and spending quality time in front of my computer today. If you are on the same page, you will most definitely be interested in knowing about all the great deals that are happening today
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  • Figuring out how to draw people is often a matter of breaking the body down into geometric shapes. When it comes to drawing people--specifically faces--you have to think of the sphere and the ovoid. Now, I'm not really a fan of looking at drawings
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  • Okay, I'll admit that skull reading and phrenology sound a little silly to me. Trying to get a sense of a person from the hollows and grooves on their skull? Not buying it. But I do know that "reading" the skull as an artist is key when
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  • No need to buy a holiday card from the card shop or grocery store when you are as capable with paint and pencil, collage and design, as all of us at Artist Daily. This year, help us ring in the holiday season by participating in our Move Over Hallmark
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  • I spend most of my time, as you well know, glued to my chair and on my computer on Artist Daily or searching artist websites and every art blog and art forum I can find. But that is when I am researching. But when it comes to developing my own artistic
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  • Shades of Gray Competition Results to Be Announced Next Month! It Kinda Draws the Eye In by Matt Tucker, 2011, graphite and white charcoal, 7½ x 14. Collection the artist. Finalist in Drawing's 2011 competition. Hello Artist Daily! This is
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  • A long time ago I read a quote from artist Nathan Goldstein and it has always stayed with me. He implied that artists are truly artists once they learn something and then forget it. I took that to mean I didn't have to study too hard in college since
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  • Click the picture above to view your free video lesson on charcoal drawing. I was inspired recently when I went to an art gallery show and saw some wonderful charcoal drawings. For so many of us, charcoal lessons were part of our first explorations of
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  • I find that being an artist or art student is a bit like being a parent. The phrase: "Do what I say, not what I do" is too often applicable. For example, as I have expressed before, my goal is sketching something every day. The sketch drawings
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  • It's strange how sketching and drawing are such old and established practices—pen and ink drawing has been around since ancient Egyptian times!—and yet no two draftsmen are ever really the same, and each one's pursuit can lead to very
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  • When I use the words "fantasy pictures," I'm usually referring to all sorts of imaginative realism--not only sci-fi art or wanting to know how to draw a dragon. But bringing in a layer of fantasy to your paintings or drawings can be daunting
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  • I recently took a life drawing class and showed my sketches to a friend, who's a super-skilled painter. I was reluctant to share them, but when she looked at my final sketch--in which the model had her hips contrapposto but twisted slightly away from
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  • Did you just read that and think, "Wha-wha-what?" Well, when I first saw the phrase--which was originally applied to the sculptures of Antonio Canova--applied to the work of Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, I had the same reaction. But it is true-
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  • Hello there, I'll be doing some blogging for Artist Daily about human figure drawing . The plan is to do half of the blogging as written text and half as video episodes where it would be easier to demonstrate the concepts I would like to talk about
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  • Straight from the master's mouth, er, hand. Study Rembrandt's drawing techniques and you'll find short strokes and quick crosshatching that the artist used to get to the heart of every visual impression he wanted to depict. The Three Trees
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  • We just sent the new issue of Drawing off to be printed, and I want to share a couple highlights that you can expect to see when the issue hits the newsstands next month. Stephen Cefalo, whose marvelous sketch "Justin" is featured on our cover
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  • Fine art has evolved in many directions, but comic book art has retained a strain of DNA from classical times. The heroic Greek gods were the forbearers of our modern superheroes and the portrayal of those heroes has carried on in the tradition of how
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  • Knowledge of anatomy is essential for artists who want their figures to appear realistic and natural. But we are not surgeons or medical professionals! Artists are not, and should not be, slaves to anatomical correctness. Académie d’homme
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  • They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But no one said that picture needed to be a photograph. As an art director, I've found that sometimes pen and ink drawings or pencil drawing illustration is simply the best way to tell a story, particularly
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  • I feel like every time I pick up a pencil to attempt portrait drawing, I am back in elementary school learning the basics of how to draw a face all over again. You know that art argument about whether you need natural talent to learn how to draw? Well
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  • Hi all! This month's winning artwork is now posted on Facebook. Every month a painting or drawing is chosen from the Member Gallery on Artist Daily, and posted on Facebook and included in the Artwork of the Month album. It's a great bunch of artworks
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  • Art makes stories come alive. To me, it is as simple as that. And sometimes without art, there is no story-—or, at least, it's not quite as good. This was the case for the great American novel Moby-Dick . It is hard to imagine that Melville's
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  • A few posts ago I wrote about how introverts are normal people (gasp!) and introduced you to Susan Cain's warm and informative book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking . I wanted to revisit it to talk about Deliberate
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  • In this issue, we trace how representational art has alternated between hyper-realism and a more lyrical expression throughout history and look at some ways in which both past and contemporary practitioners utilize these techniques.
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  • In some recent blogs, I have thought about drawing for the sake of drawing, and drawing for the sake of painting. Ja Fang Lu, an artist and instructor at Studio Incamminati, draws for these reasons too, but she also uses drawings that she is currently
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  • Swimming in the ocean of life, so to speak, it sometimes feels as though we must use every bit of energy to keep our heads above the waves. Over many years we have developed some techniques that help us to shed the heavy seaweed and barnacles of the daily
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  • When it comes to certain creative sensibilities--awareness of color, editing a concept--I trust my judgment. I think I have pretty good instincts--maybe not in the execution of said sensibilities in an oil painting I paint myself, but I know good color
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  • It's probably half-endearing (hopefully?) and half-annoying that I think there's no better way to start off the weekend than with art. But you know what I mean! As the fall season gets into full swing, I think we are all coming back around to
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  • As you know I love, love, love the New Yorker 's back page illustration challenge--where they give you an pen and ink drawing and you write in with a caption that you think goes with the image. Some are funny, some are curious, some are just plain
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  • In plein air we attempt a form of direct translation. In the studio, we may recall our observations of nature, but are freer to be inventive with color. Night Passage by Mitchell Albala, 2006, oil painting on panel, 20 x 20. It's September and the
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  • I've always thought of a painter's drawings or pencil sketches as his or her diary. A finished painting is the confident, public face shown to the world, but sketch drawings read like journal entries, where you can see an artist's preoccupations
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  • Looking at the world through an artist's eyes is a bit like peering through a pair of rose colored glasses or the equivalent, where everything--colors, shapes, people, landscapes--can serve as inspiration for a painting or drawing . But that doesn't
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  • I've always thought of art as a bit of a touchstone for really great memories in life. A few months ago I was reminded of this when I went for a visit to Scotland because, while I have snapshots galore to show for my trip, the one item that really
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  • There's something immediately nostalgic about Charles Kanwischer's graphite drawings. When I first saw them I immediately felt like I was looking at an old black and white snapshot. But in a way, his simple drawings are far better than snapshots
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  • I'm fascinated by the concept of "less is more," especially as it applies to representational painting. It's hardly intuitive that having less detail makes a painting more realistic, but that's often the case. We've all been
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  • This issue explores realism, both contemporary and historical. We also take a trip to the Woodmere Art Museum, in Philadelphia, currently hosting an exhibition filled with unconventional approaches to the realist tradition.
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  • Plenty--especially if you are trying to figure out how to draw a person in that chair. Drawing people standing up is waaaaaay more straightforward than puzzling out how to proportion and position a figure sitting down. But to draw people this way opens
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  • When I first saw the work of drawing artist Joan Wadleigh Curran I felt trapped...in a very good way. Curran takes as her subject matter from objects and places that most people would steer away from—dirty trash bags snagged on a chain link fence;
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  • Not all art competitions are created equal. There are some that are themed art contests, and others are more open-ended about narrative. One art competition could have an open call for artists, and another could require its participants to submit work
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  • I'm not telling you anything you don't already know when I say that successful portraiture is successful when the portrait artist, foremost, captures a likeness. Yes, I ardently believe that there has to be something more to the story—a
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  • There's no shame in your game if you haven't heard of this kind of perspective drawing ...or lack thereof. I kind of pride myself on knowing a good bit about how to draw perspective (although my actual execution of a perspective drawing is usually
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  • Almost every artist I know who depicts people or creates portraits has spent time painting from photographs or drawing from them. It may not be how they develop a work foremost, but it is a useful method, especially when you want to capture a likeness
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  • I thought I'd share a sneak peek of the new issue of Drawing , on sale soon! The amazing cover drawing is by British artist Greg Eason . In my opinion, the drawing is even better inside the magazine--on the cover it's cropped, and there's
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  • Drawing includes many types of art, and to a great extent, what is considered to be drawing is a personal choice. In this issue, we look at artists working in nontraditional drawing styles and media, whose work can expand our perception of what drawing can be.
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  • There are people who can sleep anywhere--in a car, on a couch, even standing up. I'm not one of those people. And it is the same for when I find the time to make art--I can't just plop down and do it anywhere. It doesn't feel right, and I
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  • It's that time again: the time for nations big and small to meet and lay claim to their dominance based on overinflated biceps--um, I mean, athletic prowess. I'm talking about the Olympics, of course. Whether you're an avid Games-watcher or
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  • I'm totally a sci-fi junkie and H.R. Giger is truly a master artist in the genre of fantastic realism. I first came across his work through his designs for Alien . Lately, with the release of Prometheus , his art came up on my radar again. Now, his
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  • Jeffrey Watts: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Jeffrey R. Watts is a southern California native. Growing up in rural San Diego county with an artist father, Watts demonstrated an early aptitude for the visual arts. After an injury cut short his
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  • Jennifer McChristian: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Jennifer McChristian was born and raised in Montreal, Canada. In 1986 she and her family took permanent residence in Los Angeles. In 1990 she earned a B.F.A with honors from Otis Parsons Art
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  • Juliette Aristides: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Alexis by Juliette Aristides, oil painting. Juliette Aristides is a Seattle-based painter who seeks to understand and convey the human spirit through art. Aristides is the founder of and an instructor
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  • I'm not a napping kind of person. When I'm up, I'm up and I want to be doing something or on the go. That's usually the kind of body drawing that I'm pulled to as well--muscles torqued, body indicating action, and an underlying sense
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  • There are subject matters that are fairly easy to take in and those that need more time to understand and a willingness on the part of the viewer to move out of his or her comfort zone. Works that artistically represent intense events--like violence or
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  • Given what we've discussed in the last two articles, Am I an Artist? and Am I a Real Artist ? Not to mention Part-Time Artists Are Artists, Too --you probably have a pretty good idea of what my answer to this one will be, but let's talk about
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  • If art was a place on the map, pencil sketching would be its somewhat lawless backcountry. Sketching is all about freedom from rules and learning how to sketch what's in front of you no matter how unexpected. That's why sketching seem like the
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  • Henri Rousseau is best known for his exotic jungle scenes, but did you know that he never left France during his lifetime? All the imagery he painted was invented entirely in his mind and perhaps coupled with inspiration he got from listening to others
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  • You can tell a lot about an artist's point of view by how they draw people . It sounds simple but in fact the diversity of vision and execution is pretty vast. There are contemporary artists out there practicing in a traditional vein dating back to
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  • I don't care what anyone says, color is king. It makes everything better--more appealing and lively. Oftentimes in an artist's drawing practice, a sense of color takes a backseat to the black, white, and gray of charcoal or graphite. But that
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  • Because this issue of American Artist focuses on art education, I thought it would be interesting to explore the teacher-student relationship, particularly what happens after a student completes a course of study at an academy or an apprenticeship with
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  • The winners of our Self-Portrait Cover Competition are featured in the September issue of American Artist, and they share advice about how to paint the figure and how to maintain a successful painting practice. When we asked David Tanner, the winner of
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  • Painters and draftsmen alike puzzle through perspective drawing issues. They almost have to if they want to establish any kind of sense of space in their work. Without linear perspective, all that remains is the flatness of the surface-and no artists
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  • "Am I an Artist?" I can't help but wonder how many nuclear physicists get up out of bed each morning and ask themselves whether they are nuclear physicists. Granted, if one is a nuclear physicist, one has concrete evidence of the fact--education
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  • An artiste is something you don't want to be, that is, if you consider yourself an artist. While it sounds akin to archaic words like poetess or authoress, which in years passed denoted a female poet or author, an artiste is a "sort of"
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  • We had a run of some pretty severe thunderstorms in the New York City area recently, and as a father of three, that's terrifying. Nothing can be worse than three kids under the age of five locked up in a house for a day, especially when the thermometer
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  • Last week we talked about whether "real" artists take workshops (they can, and do). Now let's consider whether you have to make your living full-time as an artist in order to be considered one. Many of us hold down other jobs while we pursue
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  • I have always loved charcoal drawings. A few years ago, I came across a book of charcoal figure drawings by Henry Yan , who was then an instructor at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. I immediately bought two copies of the book--one to keep
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  • One of the shows that has left a lasting impression with me is "Édouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940", which was at The Jewish Museum. Visiting this exhibition introduced me to Vuillard's life and work and resonated
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  • The number one strategy for still life painting and drawing that professional artists have recommended to me or have explained to art students within my hearing (yes, I'm a major eavesdropper) is that you should not settle for the first object that
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  • The size, clarity, and portability of an iPad begs for it to be used as a digital oil painting canvas or sketchbook page, and now you can do just that. I'm consistently amazed at the apps for artists that are being released on smartphones and tablets
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  • We've all had those moments when the details and concerns of keeping all the plates spinning distracts us from the one thing, the most important thing, that those of us who are creative people must do--create. Even doing chores that are pleasurable
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  • Have you ever looked at an abstract art piece or oil painting genre scene or pastel seascape and wonder, how'd they do that?! Chances are the answer lies somewhere in mixed media. Art that tends to defy our eyes does so for a reason--it isn't
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  • When you can do something well, it can be difficult to set it aside or modify that skill for the good of your art. John Evans is an American artist who admits to battling the tendency to overwork his oil paintings, sliding between depiction and evocation
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  • I love Masterpiece Theater on PBS. Recently the movie Birdsong aired--a love story about a soldier on the battlefield of World War I and the lover he left behind. Claude Renoir Writing by Pierre Auguste Renoir, lithograph, 1902/3. There was a scene from
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  • It Kinda Draws the Eye In by Matt Tucker, 2011, graphite and white charcoal, 7½ x 14. The spring issue of Drawing is now available, and it's full of resources for artists, especially if you are into figure drawing or figure painting. Here's
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  • When I was in Art History 101, my professor touted the competition for the design of the Baptistry doors in Florence in 1401 as one of the greatest historic art competitions of all time. In one corner we have the young Lorenzo Ghiberti, only 21 at the
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  • I acknowledge that there is a lot about the color wheel and mixing colors that I don't know. But one thing I do know is that there's more to art than color schemes and memorizing a color mixing chart. Andrew by Fred Hatt, drawing with aquarelle
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  • I feel so inundated with ideas from every single photo reference around me right now. Sometimes I am super inspired by them, but sometimes they make me want to put my paintbrush down because I get so overwhelmed by all the ways I can start painting from
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  • You don't have to think terribly hard to figure out that the painting genre that has all of these characteristics in common is floral painting . It is a practice that has inspired artists to create beautiful, graceful paintings for centuries, but
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  • Some artists, you love what they draw. But with every landscape drawing of Georges Seurat, it is the way that he draws that makes all the difference. Take any of his sketches and chances are it is fairly simple in composition. There are very few elements
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  • As an artist, I often feel that I am more sensitive than others, or perhaps I am more in touch because I need to be so that my work will flow genuinely from my heart and allow me to respond from a deeper place. That is one of the reasons that I faced
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  • Earlier this week I was lucky enough to attend the opening of Jason Bard Yarmosky's solo show "Elder Kinder" at Lyons Wier Gallery, in New York City. It's a terrific painting exhibition, and it got me thinking about how an artist can
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  • Imagine life with no television, no computers, and where books are a rarity. The power of art would increase exponentially because you wouldn't be inundated with visual images all the time. The handful of artworks you might see in your entire life
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  • Comics, of course! Back in college I got a little bit obsessed with the history of comics, mostly as an art appreciator, although I was also fascinated by how much social commentary was injected into the narratives and stories. But my interest in comics
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  • My mom is an artist, but she's nothing like me. For all that, we're both artists. If you want to know where I got my artist genes, I got most of them from her. Genes alone don't make an artist, though. Making art is kind of a stupid career
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  • Master instructor Dan Thompson teaches you how to combine numerous measurement and proportional strategies during gesture and figure drawing to create rewarding, unified results.
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  • In its most elementary form, a pen and ink drawing is stark black marks against a white surface. No dilution of color, no shades of gray. But artists who've spent time inking their way across a page know that drawing with ink can actually be an incredibly
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  • Can you think back and remember what it was like to really struggle with a concept? I've got no pride. I've done this a ton of times--riding my bike, algebra, Avogadro's number...and perspective drawing . I thought once I got to college and
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  • I've come to realize that that old saying "It's not always what you know, but who you know," is spot on. Even at American Artist magazine . Luckily, "we" know a lot of people, and as a result we have remarkable access to some
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  • One of my unhappiest memories of making art is drawing a really 70s-looking still life that my art teacher set up for us in the sixth grade. I remember being soooo bored and not interested at all in what we were doing until my teacher gave us a challenge
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  • A few weeks ago I had a studio session with Lea Colie Wight , a great painter who had a really lovely tone to her oil painting surface that many of us loved and wanted to know more about. I wanted to share that info with you! Canvas Toning Process The
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  • Whiskers. Spinach. Drip. Beyoncé. How easy do you think it is to draw those words? How about when you have to draw them on a 2-by-3-inch screen with just your fingertips? Draw Something is the new hot app for iPhones and iPads--it's essentially
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  • Yep, it is a pretty lofty goal. I know it. But there are so many incredible artists out there who are doing incredible work and deserve more visibility! Here are a few ways that you can elevate your artistic profile in the wider world. By no means are
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  • Whether or not you like to be around a lot of people is one thought to consider when you choose the right workshop for you. Descent into Bryce by Steve Henderson, 18 x 18, oil painting, also available as a limited edition signed print . Let's assume
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  • But in the very best way! When I was trolling for artists who draw like they paint and vice versa, Giovanni Boldini immediately came to mind. His mark making is a tour de force, no matter if he is working in oils, pastels, or when charcoal painting. Spanish
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  • Drawing human anatomy can be an adventure if you take it to the limits. Artist and draftsman Leah Yerpe certainly does. Her large- and small-scale drawings feature figures freefalling, tumbling, and twisting as they swoop across the page. Pleiades by
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  • As the editor of Artist Daily, I constantly experience art on the screen of my computer. It just isn't possible for me to go everywhere to see everything that I would like to in person, but images in any given online art gallery or art blog have come
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  • Lea Colie Wight drawing of a seated female. I am sure I have said this before, but it's true and deserves repeating. Watching great artists at work can be so instructive, especially if they follow a general process of work. Lea Colie Wight does exactly
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  • A few weeks ago an artist friend of mine rotated his wrist and made a wincing face after he had finished working on a quick pencil drawing , and it made me realize that drawing isn't just fun and games. It can cause strain in the hand, wrist, elbow
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  • Patricia Watwood is a skilled oil painter and incredibly deserving of a lot of praise for the art career she has built for herself. She's also quite willing to share her approach to building a network for her art, as she attests below. Enjoy! The
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  • It's funny when you think about it but the art world is built on copying. However, unlike plagiarism in journalism or literature, copying master drawings is something many artists have incorporate into their studies for centuries because it is an
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  • "It may seem controversial, but I really think artists are born, not made," says Meagan Shein. Definitely bold words, especially coming from someone who has advanced degrees in fine art and art history. "It doesn't mean that the innate
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  • So often with still life paintings, we focus on the objects in the painting first—and rightly so; they do take center stage. But still life artists know that backgrounds can play a major role in the look and feel of a painting as well. A still life
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  • Drawing magazine and Artist Daily are proud to announce that Beñat Iglesias Lopez is the winner of Drawing magazine's self-portrait cover competition. Autoteatro No. 2 (Homage to A. Ametzka and G. Martinikorena) by Beñat Iglesias Lopez
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  • Below you'll find artist and blogger Jennifer King's discussion of when a plein air painting can be too real. I don't think she's being harsh at all, but you'll have to decide for yourself. Enjoy! ***** I think it's time for some
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  • When I was six years old, I won an art competition in my local newspaper. As my reward, my drawing appeared in the comics section, right near Hagar the Horrible and Beatle Bailey. I didn't receive any sort of monetary prize, but I didn't care
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  • The appeal of tonal drawing is that it truly embodies visual subtlety. Instead of being the domain of line, the techniques that lead to a successful tonal drawing reside in value and shape. But learning how to draw tonality has been, for me, a hard road
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  • Portraiture is, in my humble opinion, the domain of artistic masters. All the greats, such as Velazquez, Rembrandt, Goya, and Sargent, can be counted as incredibly skilled and innovative portrait artists in addition to being pretty brilliant at everything
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  • Woman with a Hat (detail) by Henri Matisse, 1905, oil on canvas. Archimedes (detail) by Jose de Ribera, 1630, oil painting. Self-portrait by Vincent van Gogh, 1888, oil painting. A few days ago I was hanging out with a mixed bag of artists. And by mixed
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  • I love that my job allows me to learn something new every day—and the fact that the majority of those discoveries are art-related make them all the more inspiring. Lately I've been in art-historian mode, and I've have been trying to better
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  • Cube figures allow me to focus on the basic shapes of the body. This can lead to a better understanding of the body's form and the creation of works that are incredibly natural, such as Lea Colie Wight's drawing, Kate , conte on paper, 17 x 23
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  • Core Values: The Belvedere Torso and the Birth of the Renaissance The Belvedere Torso The earliest modern record of the Belvedere Torso dates from the 1430s. What we now view as an icon of ancient Greek civilization had just resurfaced in Rome. It was
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  • I love the idea of the recent Museum of Art and Design show, "The Artist As Jeweler," because I love art...and I looooove jewelry. But more than being able to indulge in my obsession for bracelets, the exhibition really shows that artists are
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  • There are a few artists that I would like to watch step-by-step, drawing in their sketchbooks or painting in their studios. Okay, more than a few, but after seeing Van Gogh's drawings, he would definitely be at the top of my list. Cottage Garden by
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  • I really think artistic breakthroughs happen most often when you are outside of your usual mode of working, and that includes where and how you work. Think about the times when inspiration has struck you. For me, these moments are often when I am outside
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  • You may recall that a few months ago I described my horror at learning from an instructor that we would be working on a small drawing of a facial feature for 20 weeks . Novice that I am, 20 weeks seemed an inordinate length of time to spend on a small
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  • Structural drawing by Dan Thompson, mixed media, 15 x 25, 2010. Self-Portrait After Palmer by Dan Thompson, mixed media, 19 x 25, 2003. I've taken notes from a lot of art instructors and sat in or participated in plenty of drawing classes, but when
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  • If there were any artist, past or present, into whose studio I could magically transport myself and observe him paint, it would be Claude Monet. I have always been intrigued by his painting style, especially his highly textured and complex surfaces. When
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  • Elton , 11 x 14, mixed media on gesso board, 2011. Yesterday was an interesting day for me. I thought I was near finished with a painting I had been working on for over three months, but when I sent it over to my agent in New York, who I call my third
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  • Artists working today that I admire most all usually have one thing in common—they have developed their own unique contemporary practice while still utilizing classical methods. I've come to realize that I have a bias for artwork that has a
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  • Old Cedar by Bill Guffey, oil, 18 x 24. Peasant by Joan Langdon, watercolor painting, 10.5 x 11.5. Tomiko by Adriana Guidi, oil on canvas panel, 14 x 18. That's Brian Neher's mantra for his upcoming free art contest , and it is one that I can
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  • In this issue, our Drawing Fundamentals series moves from looking at the historical roots of copying as an instructional practice to offering specific recommendations about how artists can copy master artwork in order to benefit the most from their efforts.
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  • Pages from Sabin Howard's drawing sketchbook and a finished sculpture. We just put a wrap on the winter issue of Drawing —you'll be seeing it in your mailboxes and on newsstands in February, and can order it in the Artist Daily Store as
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  • Love to draw? Love to surf the internet? Then check out Drawing magazine's new Facebook page —featuring artists, tips on drawing basics, unique educational opportunities, and exclusive news about the magazine and the fast-paced world of drawing
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  • The grapes establish dominance in an otherwise bland still life painting setup. Your still life! By following a few key guidelines when creating still life painting setups, you will be on your way to creating successful, dynamic paintings that really
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  • Recently, artist and our contributing blogger Daniel Maidman wrote a really insightful article about varying your mark making that I want to share because it seems like so many of us are refocusing our interest to drawing, and this is a great approach
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  • Two Women with Still Life by Willem de Kooning, pastel and charcoal on paper, 22 1/4 x 18 3/4 in., 1952. The artifice of line is one of the aspects of drawing that I am most in love with. The fact that we can take line—which doesn't exist in
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  • Eva Mullarky by Kristin Künc, oil on linen, 9 x 13, 2011. I can be a really hard sell when it comes to portraiture because from a beginner painter's perspective, I'm not always sure how to get the most out of a portrait painting session.
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  • In a recent painting of mine, you can see the sky and clouds are the lightest value, the towering waves and rocks are the darkest, as they are more vertical to the light of the sky. The flat of the ocean is the second lightest of the values, equating
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  • Slumber at Chuckwalla Valley (detail) by Sharon Allicotti, drawing. If art were a banquet, I would constantly be going back for more helpings of life drawing. It is a consistently rewarding artistic experience because I've never met a more inspiring—and
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  • Our contributing bloggers John Hulsey and Ann Trusty of The Artist's Road wrote a really informative blog about how to get the most out of a photograph of your painting or drawing, and I wanted to share it with you. Enjoy! Film holder frame attached
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  • Leah by Patricia Watwood, pencil on toned paper, 18 x 14, 2011. I have just finished two big projects. Foremost, my show Myths and Individuals opened at the end of October at Saint Louis University Museum of Art. In two months the show will open for it's
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  • Don't give up your plein air focus over the winter months. Try to paint from life indoors and keep sketching. ( Melting Snow by Ben Fenske, 60 x 75, oil on canvas.) For some of us, winter weather is just a bit too unpredictable and chilly to spend
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  • Precious by Russell Irwin, paper mosaic. Okay, that might have been a little too Gollum from Lord of the Rings , but Russell Irwin's latest mixed media collage titled Precious is certainly mesmerizing because of the unusual creative process that goes
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  • Back II (Joshua) by Martha Mayer Erlebacher, 2003, oil on canvas, 42 x 42. The human body is beautiful—as a whole and in its parts. Body drawings that accentuate the sensuous lines of the body and the power of the human form are steeped in a knowledge
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  • Happy Birthday to us! In our expanded March/April issue, American Artist celebrates its 75th anniversary by revisiting some of the most inspiring artists we’ve covered throughout our history. We also feature our annual workshop and art school directory.
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  • Philadelphia Story II--Spires by Sarah Yeoman, watercolor painting, 14 x 20. I don't mean literally shrink it, but if you take a photo of your painting and reduce it to thumbnail size and it still holds together compositionally, you've got a good
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  • There are so many significant milestones that an artist can mark his or her career by, but the one that is most exciting for me is the possibility of drawing people and capturing their likeness, whether it is a certain gesture they have or just the interesting
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  • Painting together with family and friends of all ages can be really rewarding. Art has been a gift in my life. It has allowed me to live more richly and fully than I could otherwise imagine. But I'm especially lucky because art found me; I didn't
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  • A photo of the cast I am drawing. My drawing, in progress. You may remember that in the fall of this year, I discussed Darren Kingsley's class and his comment that we would be working for many weeks on our drawing of a facial feature in his class
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  • Figure drawing by Judith St. Ledger-Roty, charcoal drawing, 2011. I have been taking a figure drawing class that focuses on doing a comparatively long figure pose, working in charcoal. (We do one minute, five minute, and ten minute drawings, too, so 'long'
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  • Matthew Carr refused to use pure white in his drawings, treating his surface with charcoal before he began. ( Gordon , 2006, conté pencil on prepared charcoal paper, 56 1/2 x 44.) As you all might remember, charcoal drawing and I haven't always
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  • The Honorable Clarence Harmon, Mayor of St. Louis by Patricia Watwood, oil on canvas, 24 x 18, oval, 2002. Collection of St. Louis City Hall. Someone recently asked me what I did to get recognized and become part of the art scene in my hometown of St
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  • Ariadne by Janet Rogers, watercolor painting. Since coming to Artist Daily, my parents are both super supportive of me and our web community. My mom does her best to get everyone she knows to join us at Artist Daily, and my dad buys me art supplies in
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  • Ugh, after all the holiday eating I've been doing, I should probably go exercise or run laps. But as a warm up I thought I would talk about physicality, power, and movement in oil painting . Maybe this'll be the inspiration I need to get off my
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  • All the hard work and unique vision that we pour into our painting and drawing can result in artwork that we are proud of. The next step is to make an accurate photographic record of our art to share with friends, collectors, galleries and perhaps to
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  • Pastel drawing by Lea Colie Wight. At Studio Incamminati, it is not unusual for instructors or fellows who are not teaching a particular class to come in to draw or paint beside the students. This happened recently when Lea Colie Wight joined in a figure
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  • David Hockney asserted that Jan Van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait was created with optical tools. The camera lucida is something I've known about for years, but I didn't know there was such controversy surrounding it--or that people felt so passionately
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  • Train Tracks by Valerio D'Ospina, 2011, oil on melamined MDF, 30 x 24. Some artists such as Jackson Pollock discover and use their own visual language to communicate with the world, and this singular voice takes them through an entire career of putting
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  • I love this post from Cate, the web editor of Cloth Paper Scissors , which is the mixed media sister site of Artist Daily. Enjoy! Doodles by Robin Olsen, designed by using prompts. "I'm so bored." Now there's a lament anyone who's
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  • Taking just a few minutes to survey a scene and sketch it can help work out any challenges you might come across with the orientation of objects, color, and more. Okay, it isn't a he or a she, but an 'it': composition! I know, not the handsome
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  • Drawing of a nose by Darren Kingsley with graphite pencil. The fall session at Studio Incamminati has begun, and I am taking classes with Darren Kingsley. One is in charcoal, and the other in graphite pencil . Last year as a new student, I was introduced
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  • Kinder Love by Jason Bard Yarmosky, 2011, pencil drawing, 18 x 24. Frontal Study of Naked Man by Leonardo, 1503- 09, pen and ink drawing, 9 1/4 x 5 3/4. Looking East by Kerry Brooks, colored pencil drawing. I'm excited to report that the fall issue
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  • Darren Kingsley Self-Portraiture: An Essential Artist's Exercise Regardless of style, artists are known to return time and again to working from the life model. The human form speaks to us on an instinctual level and offers a wellspring of fresh inspiration
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  • The Grimaces by Louis-Leopold Boilly, 1823, lithograph, 13 1/8 x 10. A few weeks ago I was in the Met and saw "Infinite Jest," an exhibition of drawings and prints that explore satire and caricature from the Italian Renaissance to the present
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  • Every time I get on Artist Daily I am a little bowled over by the strides and accomplishments we all are making in our art. I get the same feeling when I look at the winners of the Utrecht 3rd Annual Art Competition , whose winners were just announced
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  • Last time we discussed the idea of switching up art practice techniques . The concept was that, while repetition builds skills, change keeps the mind sharp and the work lively. I've been thinking about ways I personally switch up techniques. The first
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  • This is a blog about drawing people from one of my favorite co-workers, Cate, the online editor of Cloth Paper Scissors . Enjoy! Proportion is key to life drawing. When I was a kid growing up in Michigan, I was privileged to take classes at Cranbrook
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  • Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I by Nicholas Hilliard (attributed), 1585. I can only imagine the excitement and thrill of sitting for any one of the great portrait painters in history such as Bronzino, Velazquez, and Sargent. But then my mind goes directly
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  • Optimal Orientation of Subject and Artist in Plein Air Before the first daub of paint is squeezed out of the tube and brush is put to canvas, many plein air painters have already set themselves up for failure. How? By selecting a site that doesn't
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  • This issue considers the gentle and peculiar graphite portraits of Jason Bard Yarmosky, who draws his grandparents wearing various costumes in order to reassess cultural assumptions about old age. It also includes another article that explains how artists can use the proportions of the figure to aid
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  • Drawing by Edward Schmidt. When I was the one in charge of my infant cousin, I would always scramble frantically for ways to keep him entertained. Toys, sounds, and funny faces—I tried everything. But the most memorable way I kept him happy was
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  • Demonstration: Exploring Composition Through a Limited Focus A "limited focus" isn't limiting at all, but expands our options in composition The first compositional move any painter makes is to apply a limited focus. Whether it be a still
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  • Here it is: Make better art by learning from better artists. Duh, right? But I don't think that way often enough. I'm all about looking at artwork—more and more and more artwork—but sometimes I don't really put my thinking cap
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  • Click on any of the above images to see David Kassan's Drawing the Eyes . That is no small task, no doubt about it. Yet hundreds of thousands of us search every year online about how to draw eyes. Mostly, I think, because we take drawing eyes for
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  • Isn't hanging a painting as easy as that? Yeah, right! There are so many ways that you can showcase your work, and each one can make such a difference in how each painting or drawing is perceived. Unframed. I prefer the art that I have in my apartment
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  • Ernest Lawson (1873 - 1939) came to maturity at the dawn of the 20th century, so his work was modern and gritty and real. His are not the idyllic landscape paintings of Corot , nor are they the dazzling light shows in Monet's plein air paintings
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  • Am I built like Jason Statham? Hell no! But a parallel approach to art practice has helped me when I make pictures of guys who are. I find it useful to phrase the ongoing practice of painting and drawing in exercise metaphors. Whatever your daily practice
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  • Reflect Your True Vision with Accurate Form Now you can paint the human form with the depth and detail it deserves - your artwork will come alive with this exciting special issue from American Artist: Portrait and Figure Painting Highlights Fall 2010. Improve the detail of your portraits with 100 pages
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  • In this issue, Kenneth J. Procter discusses his work in the medium of powdered charcoal and looks at his own evolution as an artist. The issue also features a special section on portraiture, a subject with great expressive potential despite the restrictions portrait artists sometimes must work under
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  • My early charcoal drawing. The charcoal drawing using the Studio's method. Once again, time for me to go back to school at Studio Incamminati . In preparing for classes, I have been reviewing my last year's drawings again. I am reminded of something
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  • Looking at Leonardo da Vinci's sketch of birds I imagine how the artist likely thought about more than just the birds themselves. He would have been caught up in ideas of flight and soaring in air. That's the power of a sketch. It can transport
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  • I'll be honest with you all--I am not a painting technician. I read a lot about art and, as you know, love to look at paintings and drawings all day long, but I am still a babe in the woods when it comes to many methods and approaches to painting
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  • Employ A Wide Range Of Media And Styles; Spanish Masters From Ribera To Goya; Mapping The Face Through Large Self-Portraits; How To Draw Active, Lifelike Figures; Advice For Drawing Leaves+ Plants In Perspective.
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  • Mastering the art of simplicity; large-scale graphite drawings; improve your drawings through anatomy; 15 cover contest winners revealed; how to draw the outline of a figure.
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  • Paris by Danny McCaw, 24 x 16. Not to be a whiner, but I don't have an artistic legacy to build on. So far as I know, no one in my family is an artist or has any particular leanings towards painting or drawing. That's why I'm so enamored with
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  • But I think it's time for some straight talk. I've participated in many, many plein air painting critiques over the years, and I can't begin to tell you how often I've been faced with landscape paintings that are a little off. Perhaps
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  • And I am! I'm calling myself out on the carpet. I've got a handful of mirrors in my apartment and don't take advantage of what is right in front of me. Which is why I'm fired up about getting people to do more self-portraits--including
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  • Manhattan Nocturne by Frank Federico, pastel painting, 20 x 24. I have a tried and true love affair going with color. I'm drawn to it across the spectrum, but I'm a late bloomer when it comes to pastel painting, which has to be some kind of crime
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  • Cast drawing and painting is a tried and true method of learning how to draw in a classical manner. It forces a student to acquire new perceptual and conceptual skills in order to complete the given task at hand. Normally, the process takes several months
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  • Female Nude by Thomas Eakins, oil painting, c. 1881. The Thinker by Thomas Eakins, oil painting, 1900. Thomas Eakins earned himself quite a reputation during his lifetime. He didn't suffer fools gladly, he didn't hold his tongue, and he didn't
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  • Self-Portrait by Kristin Kunc, oil on linen, 2011. As you probably well know, I'm online...a lot. And I'd like to think of myself as somewhat well informed about artist websites. I'm on them all the time—whether it is through an email
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  • Using Edges to Improve Your Compositions; How to Draw Arms With Strength and Conviction; Drawing Fundamentals: The Figure in Action; Depict the colors of the Night; Dramatic Shadows for Subtle Effect.
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  • Sarah Simblet (her pen drawing, Isis 38 , above) taught me a lot about how intertwined the semblance of motion and mark-making are in really good drawings. Maybe it is part of having an arts career or maybe it is just me, but I love books and magazines
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  • Drawings of horses in the Chauvet caves. We recently watched the Werner Herzog film, Chauvet: Cave of Forgotten Dreams . Herzog made the film about the prehistoric, 30,000- to 32,000 year-old cave art discovered in 1994 in the Ardeche region of France
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  • When I flipped through the Fall issue of Watercolor magazine—celebrating their 25 th year in print (whoop whoop!)—I was super impressed with the feature article on "25 Artists to Watch." It confirms what I know is happening out in
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  • Marjorie Forgues' figure drawing, day 1. Marjorie Forgues' figure drawing, day 2. Taking a painting or drawing class is always a learning experience, but often I find I learn a great deal from other artists in the class as well. This is especially
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  • I am kidding! So kidding! But I was thinking about this article and how I wanted to discuss working with a model, specifically how to position your model in a figure drawing , and what that position can convey both compositionally and as part of the narrative
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  • One of the offerings in the show is Degas' Two Dancers , a pastel painting on Canson vellum paper. I wish! But there is an amazing art show going on that I should be going to (along with eating assorted baked goods and cheeses and chocolates). Matisse
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  • Seeing John Phillip Osborne at his canvas reminds me of all the things I think of and value as an artist. I know I don't have to explain it to all of you , but when I am in situations with people who aren't as passionate about art I find myself
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  • Hi all! It's time to submit your drawing, painting, and sculpture to the Utrecht Art Supplies 3rd Annual Art Competition ! I'm excited to see all the entries and who is going to take home all this great stuff! Details about the prizes below. And
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  • Unknown Woman by Thomas Wilmer Dewing, 1890, pastel painting on paper. I love the effects and colors you can get with pastel paintings . . . at least I do now. It wasn't too long ago that I felt like I had some kind of weird complex where I could
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  • Oil painting demonstration by Robert Liberace. To listen to Robert Liberace talk during one of his demonstrations, sometimes, fleetingly, it sounds to me like there is an occasional contradiction. The most recent example I can point to is when he talked
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  • Fifty by Mitchell Albala, 2006, oil painting on canvas. In this painting, the artist strongly distinguishes the land and sky to give a sense of vertical distance. This summer I've been traveling a bit, but of course it's never as much as I would
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  • The cave paintings of Lascaux. Legend has it that Pablo Picasso remarked upon emerging from a visit to Lascaux cave that, "we have discovered nothing new in art in 17,000 years." The beautiful artwork from this ancient era is a reminder of our
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  • Notice the chalk lines drawn over the figure to assess and check the proportion and length of her limbs. I have finally finished my oil painting , Leaves of Grass , which I have blogged about previously. In all, the painting probably took nearly 2 months
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  • My version of an art "mixed tape" is a bunch of really great info and inspiration for us as we head into the home stretch of summer. Here are several of my favorite recent Artist Daily blog entries and American Artist online articles that have
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  • This is a long pose drawing that made it into my "evaluate" pile. Part of the artistic learning process for me is learning how to evaluate my work, not on a piece by piece basis, but collectively. This summer I am looking at my drawing art works
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  • For this brush and ink drawing, I applied what I learned from da Vinci, but moved in my own direction. Sad is the disciple who does not advance his master. --Leonardo da Vinci Maybe you remember--in my earlier post when I recommended that you choose a
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  • Left: Kem , detail, 2004, 48 x 24, oil on canvas. Right: Hands #1 , 2011, 24 x 24, oil on canvas. I am not claiming either painting is better, but without my figure drawing practice between 2004 and 2011 I couldn't have painted the newer painting
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  • I used to waste oodles of time blocking in my plein air paintings until I finally learned some great tips for doing them fast, such as skipping the drawing, establishing the value range first, and addressing each set of values in a logical order. Here's
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  • Fallen Tree, Mississippi by Jeffrey Smith, 11 x 14, oil painting. My studio is filled with stuff to look at: still life objects, postcards of paintings that I love, and written notes of things to think about and remember as I'm working on a painting
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  • Woman on a Treadmill by Kate Sikorski, figure drawing, 2009. I am a firm believer in starting a life drawing with the envelope—the shape you first draw before anything else. I've come to think of it as one of my drawing basics. This envelope
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  • Watercolor study by John Hulsey, 7 1/2 x 7. Being strong dog proponents (especially for dogs in the studio, where they never provide negative commentary), and being the caretakers (or is it the other way around?) of two ancient (in dog years) Great Pyrenees
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  • Believe it or not, this piece of cloth was sky painted by artist Terry Maddox using light-sensitive paints. Yowza--it's beautiful. Who says I have to start painting or drawing on a blank page? Some of my favorite drawings are doodles that are on torn
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  • Portrait of Ginevra di Benci by Leonardo da Vinci, 1474-1476, oil painting on wood, 16.5 x 14.5. I've described the most important technical parts of my study of Da Vinci: line and anatomy . When I began to study how to paint, I opted not to follow
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  • I don't want to learn how to paint from just anyone. I don't mean that snobbishly, but I know how I work and learn. I am a visual learner and I learn by doing. Hearing someone drone on and on makes me want to get up and run around the room, so
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  • A photo of the plein air landscape site I chose to paint. I can still recall the first morning I saw this little bend in the river ike it was yesterday. The air was still cool and breezy, the sun was glinting off the water, the bees in their hive were
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  • Rocky Cliff by Asher B. Durand, oil on canvas, 1860. Based on an article by Allison Malafronte. As you all well know, I spend a lot of time writing. But I also spend a lot of time reading, and lately I have absolutely fallen in love with reading letters
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  • The ACOPAL show featured contemporary American Realist painting. Whenever I step inside the beautiful and historic National Arts Club, on Gramercy Park in Manhattan, I'm reminded of how long it has been a supportive home for American Realism. In May
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  • Peter Kelsey's cast drawing of the male torso. Hey fellow artists! Drawing anatomy seems overwhelming to me sometimes, but if I focus on strategies for HOW to learn it, it starts to seem doable. Here are a few tips I learned from a recent article
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  • Ellen Cooper’s In Defiance of Erebus won the People’s Choice and First Place Award. After participating in a panel discussion about career goals for artists at this year’s Portrait Society of America Conference I wanted to share a few more tips that I use to keep my art growing and
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  • As I was struggling to pull my drawings together, I realized that it didn't matter how good my line got, because I couldn't tell what I was looking at. The topic was the human body, and more specifically, the back. If you've gone through life drawing, perhaps you know the problem. You're
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  • From the time I started drawing, I have had a constant battle with myself over how to start. For years I have been looking for the one right way to sketch in a composition or block-in an underpainting. Lately, and with the help of my Studio Incamminati instructors, I have learned that there are several
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  • Painting flowers is sometimes a study in the subtlety of color, as in Ann's flower oil painting, Philadelphus III (oil, 12 x 16). Painting large flower portraits has given me the opportunity to explore what seem to be the nearly infinite shades and
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  • When trying to draw the head correctly on the body, pay specific attention to the neck and the placement of the head upon it, above the ribcage. Double check the alignment of the center line of the face, as compared to the sternum ( centerline of ribcage) and linea alba (centerline of abdomen).
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  • Love your space as much as you love your craft American Artist Studios is back and bigger than ever with a special issue devoted to making beautiful and functional spaces for all your creative needs.
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  • Golden by Daniel Gerhartz, oil on canvas, 16 x 12. Since its inception in 2009, Weekend With the Masters Workshop & Conference has brought together some of the top instructors of representational art under one roof for a long weekend of workshops
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  • When John Hulsey and Ann Trusty told me the name of their website— The Artist’s Road —I smiled to myself because they got it so right! Art—painting, drawing, sculpting, all of it—is a path, a journey. Sometimes the path is smooth and things go right, and sometimes it is
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  • An ink drawing from an artist's journal. Art journals are a hot trend right now for mixed media artists, and one that I'm especially attuned to. I love art journals. They are akin to sketchbooks, but usually have a lot more finish to them--as
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  • Hi all! This is my first blog at Artist Daily, and I wanted to jump right in and discuss one of the best things I think a plein air painter can do—use a sketchbook to plan your composition and clarify your vision of the finished painting you have in mind.
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  • So many of us keep sketchbooks to make quick drawings, work through compositional possibilities, and just practice mark-making. An art journal is exactly what it sounds like, a bound book of artistry that can take all of your exploration to the next level. Many mixed media artists create art journals
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  • Artists create for a lot of reasons--ego, instinct, livelihood--but author and painter Margaret Krug creates for a very unique reason: to enfold us in the intimacy and delicacy of her personal artistic vision. Often working on a small scale, sometimes on a surface no larger than a postcard, Krug paints
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  • Persian Archer by Dan Thompson, 18 x 28, oil painting, 2004. Dan Thompson: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Dan Thompson was born in Alexandria, Virginia, and graduated from the Corcoran School of Art, in Washington, DC. He earned his M.F.A. from the
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  • Untitled by Daniel Sprick, 2006, 24 x 24, oil painting. Daniel Sprick: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Daniel Sprick was born in Little Rock, Arkansas. He studied at the Froman School of Art and The National Academy of Design and received his B.F
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  • Figure Throwing Ball by Rob Liberace, chalk drawing on paper, 24 x 36. Rob Liberace: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Robert Liberace is considered by many to be a contemporary classicist, equally accomplished in sculpture, drawing, and painting and
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  • The Love on the Road by Ron Hicks, oil painting. Ron Hicks: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Ron Hicks grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and was introduced to art at an early age under the influence of his artist mother. Continuing to pursue drawing through
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  • Pastel painter and oil painter Albert Handell. Albert Handell: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Pastelist and oil painter Albert Handell was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. At an early age, a favorite activity of his was drawing with chalks on
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  • Approaching Noise (in progress) by David Jon Kassan, oil painting on wood panel, 40 x 34. David Jon Kassan: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Following his initial drawing studies at University of the Arts, in Philadelphia, David Jon Kassan attended
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  • Twilight by Tony Ryder, 1998, pencil drawing, 25 x 19. Tony Ryder: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Anthony Ryder studied at the Art Students League of New York, the New York Academy of Art, and the Ecole Albert Defois, in France, with oil painter
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  • Scott Christensen working on a large oil canvas. Scott Christensen: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Given that Scott Christensen rarely picked up a brush until his college years, some would say he came to the canvas late indeed. Yet in a sense, art
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  • Maya with Guitar by Susan Lyon, oil painting, 12 x 9. Susan Lyon: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Susan Lyon studied painting at the American Academy of Art and the Palette & Chisel Academy of Fine Arts, both in Chicago. It is there she first
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  • Dawn, High Tide-Navesink River by Skip Whitcomb, oil painting on linen, 10 x 20. Skip Whitcomb: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born in 1946, M.W. Skip Whitcomb has been interested in art since his childhood on a ranch near Sterling, Colorado. However
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  • A Wind to Ward Off Dreams by Jean-Pierre Roy, 58 x 68, oil painting, 2010. Jean-Pierre Roy: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Jean-Pierre Roy is an artist and teacher currently living and working in New York City. Born in Santa Monica in 1974, Roy pursued
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  • Throughout his career, Richard Schmid has promoted art education through his books, articles, workshops, seminars, and television presentations. Richard Schmid: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Richard Schmid was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1934.
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  • Winter Sun, Full Moon by Marcia Burtt , acrylic painting. Marcia Burtt: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Marcia Burtt graduated from University of California Berkeley with a major in psychology and earned an M.A. in art from the University of Montana
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  • Market Colors by Scott Burdick, oil on canvas. Scott Burdick: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Scott Burdick was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1967, where his mother and father encouraged his interest in art from an early age. "I spent a lot of
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  • Thinking Man by Jacob Collins, oil painting, 30 x 20, 2004. Jacob Collins: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Jacob Collins is a leading figure in the contemporary revival of classical painting. He earned a B.A. in history from Columbia College and attended
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  • Light at Sunset by Joseph McGurl, oil painting, 24 x 36. Joseph McGurl: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Joseph McGurl has been referred to as one of the acknowledged leaders in the current American landscape painting arena. This has been confirmed
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  • Self-Portrait by Daniel Graves, oil on canvas, 2007. Daniel Graves: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Daniel Graves , born in Rochester, New York in 1949, is an oil painter, etcher, and founder and director of The Florence Academy of Art, Florence,
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  • Vineyard Melody by Camille Przewodek, 16 x 20, oil on canvas. Camille Przewodek: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Camille Przewodek is a plein air colorist based in Petaluma, California, who received her B.F.A. in illustration from the Academy of Art
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  • Nouveau by Daniel Gerhartz , oil painting. Daniel Gerhartz: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Daniel F. Gerhartz was born in Wisconsin in 1965, where he now lives with his wife Jennifer and their four children. His interest in art piqued at an early
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  • Drawing of Taheera by Sherrie McGraw, 2009, charcoal, 24 x 18. Sherrie McGraw: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Sherrie McGraw has been at the forefront of the American art scene for more than 30 years. As a young woman in Oklahoma City in 1978, she
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  • Morning Light Crystal Cove , by Joe Paquet, oil painting on linen. Joseph Paquet: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Joseph Paquet received his Bachelors of Fine Art at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City, and had the good fortune of being mentored
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  • This is the third year that American Artist has partnered with Utrecht for their Third Annual Art Competition , and it looks like the prizes are the best yet. The grand prize winner receives a six-week scholarship to Studio Incamminati in Philadelphia
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  • Wilson uses the visual world as a lexicon of poetic images, as in his painting, Mary . In the 19th century, painters depicted modern life, embracing the “real” and eschewing narrative subjects and symbolism. Now, modern figure painters are
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  • Scott Burdick and Susan Lyon are skilled artists, inspiring instructors, and just really kind people. If you've ever been in a workshop with either of them, you are lucky enough to know what I mean. In watching them work, you get a sense of the sensitivity and thoughtfulness with which they craft
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  • Sometimes in making a small study for a larger oil painting, an artist will sketch in certain areas very loosely. It's almost as if she says to herself, "and there's some other stuff that fills in this area of the composition, but I'll think about that later." With the set of small
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  • Study for Leaves of Grass . All works by Patricia Watwood. With the image of a female figure reading in the summer grass in mind, I began to develop my oil painting , Leaves of Grass . I started with a preparatory drawing. I work with models and from
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  • I've been waiting all my life to have a red-carpet moment, but who knows when the Academy will get around to remembering my searing director's debut at the age of 14, when I put on a musical version of Hamlet to the theme song of The Beatles' "Obladi Oblada." (Maybe you had to be
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  • Measure First, Draw Second; The Pathway to Great Compositions; Make Every ?Brushstroke Count; Learn How Top Artists Paint; How the Academic Technique can Work for You
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  • Point Lobos , oil, 12 x 16. All works by Matt Smith . Have you ever had a moment where you’ve stumbled on something unexpected and you think to yourself, “What a find!” That was so me a few days ago. I read an amazing Q&A that one
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  • My Superfine Studio Solution Competition is going on now! What solution--and no solution is too great or too small--have you come up with lately in your painting or drawing practice that has made your process easier? We want to know and reward you for
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  • When I was first introduced to the concept of linear perspective, I was fortunate because it wasn’t in a dry, boring geometry lesson but in an art history class, where it was touted as a feat of the High Renaissance and associated with some of the most incredible art and architecture in the world
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  • As plein air artists, we have had to become very aware of our own visual filtering processes--our visual biases. We train ourselves to focus our eyes and our minds on the subject before us, but it is only when we can quiet the mind from labeling and judging what we see that we are ever able to truly
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  • 10 Keys To Making Accurate Judgments; Use Measurements & Simple Shapes for Better Portraits; Learn Variations of Impressionist Painting; 4 Stages Of Successful Plein Air Paintings
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  • An artwork by Andrienne Shishko that has been stuck in my head from my last visit to Cloth Paper Scissors. To me, one of something is never enough. And that goes especially for my artistic interests. I love painting and drawing as you well know, but I
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  • When we start making art, we don't start from a position of, "I want to paint like so-and-so," or not even, necessarily, "I want to paint well." We should start from a position of, "I have a need to make art." This is an important principle; it gives us the strength
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  • Last year's American Artist Cover Competition winning painting on the July/August issue. After poring over thousands of paintings and drawings that you submitted, Artist Daily is proud to announce the winners of this year’s American Artist Cover
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  • It's always with a bit of anxiety that I do a pencil drawing. I want the form to look as if the paper doesn't exist--as if the image is coming right off the page, and that is a challenging task. I caught Scott Waddell's second installment
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  • Imagine breaking down even the most complex painting into just a handful of shapes. Painter Ron Hicks has found that the process of painting a portrait can be intimidating, if not overwhelming, to even the most practiced painters because a lot of detail is often confused with what makes a successful
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  • Study by Will Pierce, Maryland Institute, College of Art. I'm always eager to see what young artists are painting or drawing—what's capturing the attention of college art students and occupying their creativity. It is a way to discover how
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  • Margaret Krug is a skilled, compelling artist and instructor, and author of An Artist's Handbook: Materials and Techniques . This year she is taking a small group of students on an drawing odyssey of sorts, traveling to Spannocchia in central Italy
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  • 50 Products Guaranteed to Improve Safety & Storage in Your Studio; 6 Historic Studios You Can Visit; Big Solutions for Small Spaces; Clever Ideas for Adapting a Bedroom, Garage, or Unused Space
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  • We received hundreds of strong, compelling entries for the American Artist , Watercolor , and Drawing 2011 Cover Competitions. The American Artist editors have determined the winning pieces of art, and all finalists have been notified. The list of winners
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  • Reflect Your True Vision with Accurate Form Now you can paint the human form with the depth and detail it deserves – your artwork will come alive with this exciting special issue from American Artist: Portrait and Figure Painting Highlights Fall 2010. Improve the detail of your portraits with 100
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  • Artist and instructor Marcia Burtt painting a beach scene at Weekend With the Masters. I can honestly say I've never been to an event like American Artist's Weekend With the Masters workshop and conference, which is currently underway in Southern
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  • Rossina's Apple by William Rose, 2007, charcoal on museum board, 28 x 20. The American Artist , Watercolor , and Drawing magazine cover competitions offer once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to present your artwork in notable, public way. Imagine, your
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  • Twilight by Anthony Ryder, 1998, pencil and pastel on gold paper, 25 x 19. The event I’ve been looking forward to since I came to Artist Daily is just a few days away. Weekend With the Masters 2010 is almost here. I’ve been told that the energy
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  • On the Cover: Nelson Shanks in the natural north light of his home and studio in Philadelphia. Photo: Nathan Kraxberger FEATURES The Proper Disposal of Supplies, Solvents, and Waste by Daniel Grant Artists savor many things, including sketches, correspondence
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  • Rossina's Apple by William Rose, 2007, charcoal on museum board, 28 x 20. It would be so exciting to have an Artist Daily member receive exceptional coverage from our print magazines by winning the cover competitions for American Artist , Watercolor
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  • On the Cover: Wet Hair (detail, reversed) by Jonathan J. Ahn, 2009, charcoal, 24 x 18. Collection the artist. FEATURES Choosing the Right Drawing Paper by Karen Meyer-Berthel The many differences between drawing papers can be so subtle that it is not
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  • Experiment with Acrylic; Learn from the Masters: Hawthorne, Hensche & Sargent show you how to become A better artist; Drawing from Life; Combine Media in Deep & Meaningful Still Lifes
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  • Painting instructors often ask students to consider two important relationships between the colors squeezed out on their palettes: value and temperature. By that they are asking them to consider whether one color mixture is lighter or darker than another, and whether the mixtures tend to have a warm
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  • On the Cover: Idaline (detail) by Anthony Ryder, 2007, graphite and pastel on tinted paper, 14 x 10. Collection the artist. FEATURES The Ryder Studio School: Drawing on Light & Form by Allison Malafronte Artists who want to learn Anthony Ryder’s
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  • A couple of years ago I wrote an article about an education program that introduced modern art to children in a museum setting. After seeing the artwork, the kids then had the opportunity to make their own pieces. In the workshop, they acted like successful artists—fearless, opinionated, and not
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  • How to Paint With Spontaneity & Insight; Benefit from a Beginner's; Sense of Adventure; Bring Drawings to Life In Watercolor Paintings; Professional Advice on Painting With Pastel, Oil & Watercolor and much more!
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  • Stephen Scott Young is one of the most successful, talented, and humble artists I know, and I was delighted to write about his recent work for the spring 2010 issue of Watercolor . His watercolors are currently on view at Adelson Galleries , in New York
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  • Two exhibitions of Old Master drawings that are currently on view in New York City— Rome After Raphael , at the Morgan Library & Museum, and The Drawings of Bronzino , at the Metropolitan Museum of Art—explore several interesting issues
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  • Hillside of Poppies 2008, oil, 24 x 30. I have a few suggestions to offer for this painting. The artist may want to consider showing some cast shadows across the path. These shadows would have the same direction as the shadows of the trees, bushes, and
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  • I recently joined a gym in my neighborhood, with the hopes of working off some of those extra holiday pounds that seem to wear out their welcome around this time every year. My schedule is pretty busy, so I try to streamline my visits, making a beeline
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  • Portrait of an Old Man by Roger Burch, 2009, oil on linen, 20 x 16. The artist of this painting may want to consider lightening the irises of the eyes—especially the man’s right eye, since it is farther away from the viewer. Some edges of
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  • I've written a number of articles on artists who use the sight-size approach to painting, but the method became clearer to me while I was writing an article on Paul DeLorenzo for the spring 2010 issue of Workshop . The procedure is to stand a measured
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  • On the Cover: Untitled (detail) by Mark Tennant, 2009, charcoal, 24 x 18. Collection the artist. DEPARTMENTS Editor's Note Contributors Sketchbook Where to Study Drawing: A Sponsored Guide to Some of the Best Educational Programs Learning From the
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  • When I moved to New Hampshire in the mid-1990s, I joined a local art association where the members were a mixture of "newbies" as well as seasoned professionals. In many cases the "old pros" helped us newbies learn, not only how to
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  • A few days ago I was lucky enough to head uptown to The Metropolitan Museum of Art for a preview of their new exhibition, “ The Drawings of Bronzino .” The show (which runs through April 28) comprises almost all of the extant drawings by Agnolo
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  • Greek Steps, Sifnos by Thomas W. Schaller, 2008, watercolor, 12 x 9. I just finished writing an article on Thomas W. Schaller's watercolor paintings for the April 2010 issue of American Artist, and it occurred to me that Thomas is the third licensed
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  • I normally work from plein air sketches or my imagination, but this scene I photographed while on vacation in Costa Rica was just too beautiful to pass up. As most artists do when working from a photo, I made adjustments to the composition to better suit
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  • Bianca by Nancy Guzik, 1990, oil, 40 x 24. Private collection. It’s a new year and a new decade, and no doubt some of your 2010 resolutions relate to your art career. Whether you’ve promised to make more time for drawing or painting, have
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  • Ramona by Tony Ryder, 1995, graphite, 24 x 18. Private collection. My father has been in the construction industry for nearly 40 years. When I was younger, one of my favorite things to do was visit him on the job site before a building was finished and
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  • On the Cover: Winter Glow (detail) by Neal Hughes, 2008, oil, 16 x 20. Collection Dr. Pat White. Blending Traditions of Still Life Painting Representation & Invention in Watercolor DEPARTMENTS Editor’s Note Letters What’s New at artistdaily
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  • I recently met an artist who said, completely nonchalantly, “I never sketch, I never throw out a painting, and I’m always pleased with my final work.” If only we could all be so lucky! Sometimes when I’m writing a drawing basics
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  • Last week I had the opportunity to get together with a handful of art-materials retailers from around the United States and Canada to discuss concerns about reaching the art-making world and to share what artists are purchasing and what materials they
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  • The beach scene in Manuel Antonio. I normally paint with oils mixed with Galkyd fast-drying medium, so I assume I can make radical changes in the composition of shapes, values, and colors as I formulate the intended outcome of my pictures. But I had to
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  • On the Cover: Sunflowers I (detail) by Patricia Tribastone, 2007, pastel on prepared board, 24 x 18. Collection the artist. Drawing Upon Local Community & Landscape Painting My Hometown From Photographs DEPARTMENTS Editor’s Note Letters What’s
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  • Several of the masters gathered together for a photo during the Saturday evening “Encouraging the Mastersof Tomorrow” silent auction and reception. From left to right: American Artist editor-in-chief M. Stephen Doherty, Joseph McGurl, Kevin
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  • Welsh Landscape by Patti DeWitt, 2007, oil, 16 x 20. A common challenge in painting summer landscapes is that there is usually so much green. In these cases artists can take lots of “artistic license” and have fun mixing lots of different
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  • It’s quite probable that you were already creating artwork by the time you were 20 years old. In fact, you were likely spending a good bit of time drawing, painting, sculpting, or crafting when you were 12. Those are two of the inferences that might
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  • Mountain by Michele A. Congdon, 2008, watercolor, 18 x 22. Three things would help this painting. First, the artist can vary the softness and hardness of edges. Edges in the distance can be made softer, even losing some into the sky. Second, the artist
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  • My earliest childhood memory is drawing. I was lying on the couch in the living room at age two and a half, and my mother was a glance away in the kitchen. I had a red ballpoint pen and a picture book. Gleefully, I drew a large red oval on the back cover
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  • Rossina's Apple (detail) by William Rose. Winner of the 2008 Drawing Cover Competition. In our culture, as print has taken hold over the last few centuries and magazines have developed into microcultures of their own, we've grown used to watching
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  • Some of my artist friends regret that they never attended an art college or university. It might surprise some of you to know that I majored in art at a large university and have a bachelor's degree in fine-art education. Little Long Pond, Acadia
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  • Sofie by Nora Velastegui Pettersson, 2004, watercolor, 22 x 18. The artist has created an engaging portrait of a young woman. I especially like the simplicity of the nose and the mouth. The forehead has a great sense of roundness. Parts of the hair could
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  • The American Artist editors have reviewed the submissions for the Showcase Your State: North Carolina contest, and below are the four chosen finalists. Whether it was expansive views of the Blue Ridge Mountains as seen from the Highlands; still, serene
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  • If you are one of Daniel James Keys’ 463 friends on Facebook, you’ve noticed that he used the cover of the July/August issue of American Artist as his avatar, the small image that appears when he posts a comment or news of his professional
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  • Mountain Stream by Mary Ann Stafford, 2008, pastel, 18 x 24. The rocks and water in the foreground are very effective. I would like to have more of an impression that the water on the back waterfall is moving toward the viewer and connecting with the
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  • By subtly layering pastel, Marlene Wiedenbaum creates a luscious and convincing sense of the world.
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  • Model James Orona When I was photographing George Towne’s step-by-step demonstration for the December 2009 issue of American Artist, I took 15 minutes to draw James Orona, the model who was posing for George. My Conté crayon sketch turned
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  • I admit that I am not one who adores painting on location. If the truth be known, when I visit a national park, I'd rather be exploring and walking around—taking photos of everything that strikes my interest. Oh yes, I've paid my dues by
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  • Jealous Much? by Sheri Crawford, 2008, oil on Masonite, 16 x 20. Bravo! This painting is strong in both concept and execution. It really does not need any “fixing.” A good exercise in this case is to consider alternate ideas for a piece. Another
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  • Check out what's featured in the Fall 2009 issue of Drawing magazine.
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  • Objects look convincing when a draftsman models the form correctly. Here, we take it step by step to ensure accuracy and a solid foundation.
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  • Curt Walters painting at the Grand Canyon. None of us want to be stuck in the rut of painting the same subjects over and over again, so we try different landscape locations, select new groups of still life objects, or join a sketch group that hires models
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  • Joseph McGurl teaching a class at Weekend With the Masters. I’ve never talked to as many excited artists as I did during American Artist’s Weekend With the Masters, an event that took place from September 9 through 13 at the Colorado Springs
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  • More than 5,300 artists entered one, two, or three works of art in the contest sponsored by American Artist and Utrecht art supplies, and I was one of the three judges that selected the award winners. It was both a challenging and rewarding experience
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  • Known primarily for his figurative work and for leading a resurgence in classical art education through his Water Street Atelier and the Grand Central Academy of Art, in New York City, Jacob Collins is now the founder of the Hudson River Fellowship ,
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  • See what's featured in this special issue, The Best of Drawing.
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  • I recently attended the opening of an exhibition of artwork by a group of artists, and the display raised questions in my mind about the impact of presentation on sales and career development. The exhibition was a temporary display in a community center
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  • Although I am known for using vibrant colors to create what appear to be playful, spontaneous images in my watercolor paintings, the key to the success of these paintings is the value structure of the compositions. Here’s how I teach others to use studies to plan effective compositions.
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  • Check out what's featured in the Fall 2009 issue of Watercolor .
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  • For this painting, our critic discussed the importance of background color.
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  • Check out what's featured in Studios , this special publication from the editors of American Artist .
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  • I frequently commission articles on exceptional artists who sell their original artwork through outdoor shows. I do that for two particular reasons: One is that those artists are, of necessity, well organized and able to deliver requested photographs
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  • Our critic discusses the use of shadows in this water-filled landscape.
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  • I recently traveled to Boston to see the blockbuster exhibition of paintings by the great 16th-century Venetian painters Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese that I wrote about several months ago in this blog post . While I was in the Museum of Fine Arts
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  • In the new atelier she opened in Rome, Andrea J. Smith teaches students to use a limited palette of colors when painting exactly what they see from a measured distance away from the subject and the easel.
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  • Our critic discussion color choices when creating a landscape painting.
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  • When I first moved to New York City about a dozen years ago, I drew my father's face from memory quite a lot. It usually wasn't a good depiction at all, but occasionally it resulted in a decent drawing of a handsome man — which reminds me
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  • When I meet artists at a workshop or at a convention, they often comment that I must be a highly organized person. Upon hearing this, I laugh inwardly and reply, “I'm organized in my thoughts but not with my stuff.”
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  • Most of the students attending workshops and art classes rely on the instructor’s list of recommended supplies when deciding what drawing and painting materials to use, so their resulting artwork usually looks quite similar. However, when artists
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  • Our critic offers her suggestions for this portrait of an old man.
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  • While thumbing through Burne Hogarth's Dynamic Anatomy the other day, I came across an interesting section on foreshortening that I wanted to share ...
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  • For centuries, printmaking was a means of duplicating drawings and paintings. However, by the end of the 19th century, artists were creating etchings, lithographs, engravings, and woodcuts that were unique expressions, not reproductions of drawings or paintings. Even prints created through a process
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  • Check out what's featured in the Summer 2009 issue of Drawing .
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  • Catherine Murphy’s provocative and tense graphite drawings defy category, leaving the viewer wondering if she is tightly rendering abstraction or abstracting realism.
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  • Blue Longing by Crystal MacEachern, 2007, acrylic on paper, 12 x 14. My main recommendation for this floral painting concerns illumination and shadow. There is a hint of shadow rendering in the centers of the flowers, and this concept needs to be used
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  • It's crazy to say that horses have a visual advantage over humans, but with eyes on opposite sides of their heads, they surely don't see in three-dimensional terms like we do. There are times especially for beginners when seeing less--seeing a
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  • Artists tend to focus on the future, not the past, but so much of their legacy depends on making the records of their creative work and careers available to scholars and artists
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  • Winter Day Rock Channel by Karl Terry, 2009, oil on board, 8 x 16. Being in the middle of summer it can be hard to look at a winter scene, but this one is very appealing. The colors and the composition both work. There are two minor changes I would suggest
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  • Very few rules are absolute in art. But one rule keeps popping up in our magazines, quoted by art instructors and artists of all types...
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  • Find out about American Artist's Reader Advisory Panel.
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  • Our critic discuses the importance of texture when portraying the mass of the land against the sky.
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  • Last week we talked about sparsely marked drawings, so it only makes sense that today we consider drawings in which nearly every area is marked.
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  • I recently assisted my granddaughter, Amanda, as she painted with water-soluble tempera colors in our backyard. Like most four-year-olds, she loves to draw and paint, and although her drawings have become increasingly controlled pictures of herself, her parents, five pets, and her home, the paintings
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  • The Table of Contents for the September 2009 issue of American Artist .
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  • Whether painting in oil or pastel, Connecticut artist Claudia Seymour avoids static compositions by using line, color, and design to move the viewer’s eye through the painting.
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  • Dawn Whitelaw discusses highlights while looking at this charcoal drawing.
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  • I caught the Whistler exhibition at The Frick last week and was initially concerned about its size — it hangs in that smallish room in between the place where you pay admission and the hallway to the restrooms — but I suppose at some point
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  • Drawing in ink can force an artist to either slow down and make very careful marks, or do the opposite--to ignore the permanence of the marks and make them freely. What does pen-and-ink do for you? Let us know by posting a comment.
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  • As Steve Doherty pointed out in a recent blog post, it's quite helpful to depict the same scene twice. I find this is very true in drawing, for several reasons ...
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  • Steve Doherty discusses the emotions an artist can go through during his or her first exhibition.
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  • Joyce Washor offers a few adjustements to this painting of turtles on a log, to help tighten up the composition and execution.
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  • Drawing Day 2009 was such a popular event on the American Artist website that we decided to have regular, themed drawing days for our readers. The first one is scheduled for July 4. Draw something that represents why you love your house, your land, your state, your country, your world. Draw something
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  • Joyce Washor talks about the importance of edges and details while discussing this rendering of a bird.
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  • Digital art isn't new. But when a friend told me that people are now creating art on their iPhones, I imagined that the art wouldn't be anything remarkable. Then David Kassan emailed me an example that he said he sketched very quickly from previous studies.
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  • I can't speak for anyone else, but I sure enjoyed Drawing Day 2009 ! I went to Central Park with a friend, loaded down with drawing pencils, drawing sketchbooks, painting supplies, and Gatorade. Several scenes screamed out to be captured in a quick
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  • Steve Doherty offers his suggestions for ways artists can increase the probability that their drawings and paintings will express their passion.
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  • We're pretty passionate about drawing at the magazine, so it's nice to come across other people who are as dedicated to draftsmanship and expressive drawing as we are. The folks at the Drawing Day project certainly fall into this category. For the second year, Mick Gow and his staff are urging
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  • Steve Doherty offers pieces of advice he's heard from dealers and artists on how best to help sell artwork.
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  • The Table of Contents for the Summer 2009 issue of Watercolor magazine.
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  • In the Watercolor Fundamentals article in the Spring 2009 issue of Watercolor , I explained how to set up and paint a basic floral still life. This time I will demonstrate a more involved arrangement of roses and delphiniums.
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  • Using subtle washes and minimal detail, Keiko Tanabe creates a powerful sense of time and place.
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  • Our critic looks at an impressive self-portrait drawn by a high-school student.
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  • Emerging artist Daniel James Keys couldn’t enroll at an art school, but he used every other available means to educate himself as an artist, to connect with other painters, and to promote his artwork. His experience proves that with determination, support, and computer savvy, artists can make significant
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  • Steve Doherty offers readers six tips on how to draw anything accurately.
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  • This Texas oil painter shatters multiple myths—including the notion that artists are myopic and single-minded. Qiang Huang helps workshop participants learn how to draw, paint, and sell their artwork using modern technology and traditional painting methods.
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  • Our critic looks at a painting that includes extreme high contrast and simple shapes and offers recommendations on the painting’s lighting.
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  • It's always a good time to visit The Frick, especially this summer, when people in New York will get a chance to see the exhibition "Portraits, Pastels, Prints: Whistler in The Frick Collection," a gathering of the museum's Whistlers, spanning three media.
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  • The Table of Contents for the Summer 2009 issue of Workshop magazine.
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  • Critic Colin J. Callahan warns the artist about the potential problems with flattening out the space in the background of the painting.
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  • "Bodies ... The Exhibition," currently housed in New York City's South Street Seaport, offers draftsmen the chance to draw from human specimens after hours. It's an opportunity New York City area artists shouldn't miss.
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  • Steve Doherty talks about the importance eyes hold to creating a successful portrait and explains some of the procedures successful portraitists use to execute their paintings. He also offers readers an opportunity to help the art community by participating in a survey.
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  • All artists have at least one magical place where, no matter what is going on in their day or their life, they can go and just concentrate on the beauty of nature and be rejuvenated by their surroundings. What’s yours?
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  • The Table of Contents for the Spring 2009 issue of Drawing magazine.
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  • Here are a few basic concepts of artistic perspective you absolutely need to know, whether your intentions are expressive or realist-minded.
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  • The bones of the skull offer enough information on a person's facial structure that it is possible for forensic artists and scientists to reconstruct the accurate surface appearance of an individual's face. For this reason, it is essential to understand the large bony masses of the skull and
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  • Sure, we have our favorites, even if we aren't supposed to. Here are 10 of the best articles published in Drawing magazine over the last seven years, in no particular order.
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  • In the Spring 2009 issue of Drawing magazine, we featured an article on Fred Hatt, an artist whose dynamic and powerful drawings can be classified as performances almost as much as objects. Here, we present additional artwork from the artist.
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  • Our critic talks about modifying certain colors in a still life to complement other colors within the painting.
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  • We surf the web for interesting new drawings and random information on art so you don't have to. April 28 edition.
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  • Our critic comments on two graphite portraits submitted by a reader.
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  • One reason people pursue pencil drawing is that they like the drama and look of black-and-white images. Drawing magazine is a great place to see the best of what artists working in black and white are doing. Two examples are within...
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  • Artists from across the country submitted their work for consideration in the 2009 American Artist Cover Competition. After an extensive selection process Suzanne Eisler’s Still Life With Butterfly was chosen as the winning image. It is presented here, along with artwork from the nine other finalists
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  • Gulf Coast oil painter Susan Downing-White has a found a way to depict warmly illuminated skies and coastlands using light strokes and a muted palette.
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  • Steve Doherty relays his reaction to the documentary Chris & Don: A Love Story , and talks about the process of using art as a way of preserving memories.
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  • Dawn Whitelaw looks at an oil portait and suggests careful consideration for the value in the background to help showcase the strong elements of the painting.
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  • What facial feature do you find to be the best indicator of a sitter's likeness?
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  • Idaho artist Scott Christensen is one of the most well-respected landscape painters in the country, and his understanding of light, ability to achieve pure color, and reverence for nature also make him a highly sought-after instructor. In this Q+A section, we list Christensen’s responses to 10
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  • Colin J. Callahan talks about potential problems with trying to match reproduction colors in your paintings.
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  • A look at the Bargue plates, a series of 197 lithographs that guide an art student through an increasingly difficult course of study.
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  • With adequate preparation and the right materials, it's possible to create large acrylic landscapes en plein air. by Andrew Paquette A few years ago, I left the high-stress feature-animation industry in Hollywood, California, and moved to Arizona
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  • More than 18 top painters will be teaching at American Artist’s Weekend With the Masters Workshop & Conference this September, including the following five plein air painters who will be leading master workshops and demonstrations in Colorado’s beautiful Garden of the Gods and Monument
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  • Dawn Whitelaw recomends simplifying the background to call more attention to the subject of the painting.
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  • The doom-and-gloom talk prompted by the recession has squashed sales in galleries. So why was the recent opening of a young realist's show such a success?
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  • Mary Sipp-Green bases her oil landscapes on sketches, memories, and imagination, and she makes careful notations about color combinations that capture her feelings about a particular time and place. Nevertheless, there is a point in the creative process at which she has to “get out of the way”
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  • Colin J. Callahan discuses the influence of Dutch still life painters on this particular artist's work, and suggest further exploration of the masters to help with painting still lifes.
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  • We surf the web for interesting new drawings and random information on art so you don't have to. March 24 edition:
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  • Steve Doherty talks about landscape painting, and shows a video of a recent painting excursion in New Orleans.
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  • Colin Callahan discusses providing "just the right amount of information about the landscape," which allows the artist to take liberties with other elements, such as color and light.
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  • In this passage, which we had to cut from the print article in our Spring 2009 issue of Drawing for space reasons, artist-instructor Dan Gheno explains how visualizing the arc that body parts move through will help you place the joints in the right location, ensuring proper proportions.
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  • Artist and teacher Mel Stabin recommends painting loosely and boldly, an approach that has defined his career.
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  • A simple floral arrangement can be the perfect subject for beginner still lifes.
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  • Joyce Washor looks at two versions of a watercolor painting and comments on the progress made from one version to the next.
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  • What inspired you to first pick up a pencil? For some it was first seeing an Audubon print. Others may have fallen in love with the anime film Akira. Maybe it was Superman.
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  • In the April 2009 issue of American Artist , we featured an article on Zack Zdrale, a Wisconsin artist who paints from photographs of people, sometimes using the same model in different poses so that the combined images suggest a range of conflicting emotions. Here, we present a few of his charcoal drawings
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  • Joseph McGurl grew up under his talented father’s artistic tutelage while cultivating a passion for boating and a love of the sea. This early influence, coupled with years of hard work and practice, have made him one of today’s foremost landscape painters, and in this interview he shares
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  • Joyce Washor discusses the importance of painting shadows correctly to create a more effective composition.
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  • In this passage, which we had to cut from the print article in our Spring 2009 issue of Drawing for space reasons, artist-instructor Dan Gheno explains how the tanned portions of a nude model seem to stand out and push forward, and he reiterates the value of studying individual body parts.
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  • Painting gouache on Arches black cover stock opens up a wide array of creative possibilities. by Stephanie Kaplan Self-portrait 2006, gouache, 20 x 15. All artwork this article collection the artist. Brenda Turner has a unique take on gouache technique
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  • Joyce Washor discuses the composition of this watercolor, and the importance of color and detail.
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  • Q: What are the advantages of using Plexiglas for framing drawings and watercolors? I've been told that Plexiglas can harm paintings and drawings because it can chemically react with their surface. A: Although it's highly unlikely that any kind
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  • Q: What, if any, is the difference between an outline drawing and a contour drawing? A: While an outline drawing merely points out the division between form and the space it occupies, a contour drawing is a means of describing form and its relationship
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  • Q: What does the term heightening refer to? A: Heightening is the term used when white or other light-valued colors are applied to a drawing to add depth to its range of values. Often, near the completion of a drawing, an artist may wish to increase the
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  • Q: Is there a spray fixative for watercolor paintings, and if so, should I use it? A: There is no fixative for watercolors. Fixatives are primarily used for four purposes: 1) to allow the piece to repel dirt and allow for light cleaning; 2) to make it
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  • Q: What mediums did the Impressionists use to paint such soft, colorful strokes? A: The long strokes have more to do with technique than a particular medium. It is often said that artists are products of their age. This adage is particularly true of the
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  • Q: What is the difference between oil sticks, oil pastels, and oil bars? A: All contain pigment oil and wax--just in varying proportions and shapes. Oil sticks are the hardest and can be used on surfaces prepared for oil paint. They are made with an oil
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  • Q: I’m having trouble darkening and lightening tube colors. Any suggestions? A: To get richer darks and lights, try using complementary colors. Dulling the tube color with its complement, then applying the pure color next to it, will suggest a light
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  • Q : I am just starting to learn how to draw and paint, and I have a limited budget to spend on art materials. Which pastel set would you recommend? A : Sennlier produces top-of-the-line pastels, and many artists save them for the top layer of their artwork
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  • Q : I've been mostly a casual drawer, so I’ve stuck mainly to drawing the human figure. Now that I'm looking into pursuing a career in art, I need to improve my skills in sketching backgrounds. Is there a good online tutorial or a book that
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  • Q: How is watercolor paper stretched? Should the brown paper strips be left on at the time of painting? A: All watercolor paper will buckle when becoming filled with water, but the 300 lb moves only slightly. The thinner papersóthe 90 lb and the
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  • Q: I do pen-and-ink illustration, but people seem to prefer color illustrations. How well does ink go over gouache and acrylic? And what type of paper/canvas should I use? A: Sennelier produces a wide range of rich, vibrantly colored ink that layers well
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  • The table of contents from the Spring 2009 issue of Workshop magazine.
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  • Colorado artist Quang Ho’s new instructional DVD series offers a concise version of what students can expect in his workshops, including his eight visual approaches to painting, his views on developing understanding, and a discussion of everything he wishes he had known before he started painting
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  • Steve Doherty talks about the importance of material selection in the drawing in printmaking process.
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  • Dawn Whitelaw explains how establishing a sense of depth is essential to a successful composition.
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  • Here's a sneak preview of an upcoming feature in Drawing magazine: the lively, colorful figure drawings of NYC artist Fred Hatt.
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  • Be careful not to paint portrait backgrounds a shade that is similar to a dominant color in the figure.
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  • We've all seen Leonardo da Vinci's famous drawing The Vitruvian Man. But have you read the text he wrote to accompany it? Artist and scholar Anthony Panzera presents Morris Hicky Morgan's translation of Leonardo's notes on the diagram on human proportion, along with his Panzera's
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  • In the winter 2009 issue of Drawing , we highlighted work from James Jean's sketchbooks. Here, we reproduce additional work that we were unable to include in the print article.
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  • Consistent shadows and thoughtful placement of the focal point are important components of any landscape composition.
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  • Pietro Annigoni was a great draftsman, portraitist, and teacher. We haven't been able to put a feature article together on him, but here are a few examples of this inspirational artist's work, and a bit of biographical information as well. Who else do you think has been needlessly neglected in
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  • Understanding the way in which the muscles of the mouth express the emotion of your subject is crucial in understanding how to capture that emotion on your paper. In this article I will touch upon the basic shape, form concepts, and muscular structure of the mouth and lips so that you can have these
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  • The Table of Contents for the Winter 2009 issue of Drawing magazine.
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  • Joyce Washor recommends paying careful attention to edges and incorporating foreground colors into the background to create a unified composition.
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  • Michael Graves may be best known now for designing household items and iconic buildings, but he has roots in traditional rendering, as a 2007 book featuring architectural renderings from a 1960 sketchbook shows.
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  • In this critique, Dawn Whitelaw discusses the importance of silhouette.
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  • Many pastelists consider their pieces to be paintings. Here at American Artist, we have tried to steer clear of the debate on whether pastel is a drawing medium or a painting medium, although when put against the wall and poked in the chest, we'll
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  • Dawn Whitelaw discusses proper technique when working with chalk and charcoal.
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  • B&W #6 , 2000, oil drawing on paper, 12" x 9" by Lisa Dinhofer An artist I interviewed recently, Lisa Dinhofer, said that being a good draftsman isn't enough. She said putting the emphasis on the objects in your scene is risky if it
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  • Steve Doherty asks readers about useful instruction they've received from their teachers.
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  • Sign up for American Artist's e-Newsletter for a chance to win a $500 gift certificate from Blick Art Materials.
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  • Colin J. Callahan discusses architecture in nature and the importance of finding the right green.
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  • Asher B. Durand was one of the great leaders of the Hudson River School of landscape painters, and his monthly “Letters on Landscape Painting” column he wrote for The Crayon offered readers of the time invaluable insight into his approach to painting nature. Durand’s advice is just
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  • This time of year puts the focus on family, and at the center of the family is the special relationship between mother and child. Thanks in part to the powerful patronage of the Roman Catholic Church, there are thousands of pencil sketches and preparatory
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  • The American Artist staff offers a look at their holiday wishlists.
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  • Colin J. Callahan discusses the importance of soft edges when painting a landscape where land meets water.
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  • Michael Mentler's pencil drawings from his sketchbook. David Jon Kassan, a friend and an excellent painter and draftsman here in NYC, recently sent me these words about an artist he met during his travels. Here are some images from the artist's
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  • Dawn Whitelaw suggests "calibrating the lights" to strengthen the overall composition of this painting.
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  • Above, a selection of sketchbooks from Kunst & Papier, Palo Alto, California. About two weeks ago I opened up a discussion regarding the best pencil for drawing. Now I'm interested in the best sketchbook. Although I had an opinion about the best
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  • Steve Doherty asked several well-known artists what gifts they would present to another artist during the upcoming holiday season. Here's what they said.
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  • This week, Colin J. Callahan talks about staying loose while conveying a scene.
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  • A friend recently asked how to get into a routine of drawing, and I shared with her my methods of finding the time in a busy schedule to keep progressing in my pursuit of better draftsmanship. I draw from a live model one night a week; when my schedule
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  • This week, Colin J. Callahan talks about edges and the horizon.
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  • Editor-in-Chief Steve Doherty talks about the value of art instruction videos, and asks readers for their recommendations.
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  • In the Winter 2008 issue of Workshop magazine we featured artist Jeffrey R. Watts, who had the honor of presenting an exhibition and workshop in the Taos, New Mexico, studio of one of his heroes, Nicolai Fechin (1881–1955). During the three-day
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  • Apples 2007, oil on linen, 11 x 14. This week, Joyce Washor talks about how to focus the viewer's interest. I'm a bit hard pressed to really find anything to change in this beautiful painting. If forced, I might shorten the stem on the far right
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  • Recently, two new drawing books caught my eye. I hope to review one or both in an upcoming issue of Drawing , but for those of you who need holiday gift ideas for the draftsman on your list RIGHT NOW, here's a sneak preview. Understanding Architecture
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  • Acadia National Park, Maine, USA by Jason Pritchard, 2006, acrylic, 13 1/2 x 10. This week, Colin J. Callahan looks at an acrylic painting from one of our readers and talks about the importance "atmospheric perspective." Coastal scenes are quite
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  • Occhuzzie Paint Company, a small manufacturer based in Charlotte, North Carolina, unveiled two new pigments at the Savannah College of Art & Design's Art Materials Show, held at the beginning of October. One featured ground graphite suspended
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  • by Allison Malafronte Every month I allow you to come into my cube for a few minutes and “listen in” on a conversation I had with a top plein air painter. I try to ask the artist the questions I think you as aspiring professional plein air
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  • We have provided a list of links to online art resources that we think are helpful. You can also access these links in the Art Educators section of our website. Art Associations Plein Air Plein Air Painters of America The Plein Air Scene Indiana Plein
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  • Taylor Road Barn 2007, watercolor, 15 x 22. This week, Joyce Washor looks at a watercolor painting by one of our readers and suggests varying the edges to add a sense of distance to the painting. The artist has done a remarkable job on this painting.
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  • During the course of my work with Drawing magazine, I occasionally get to visit with Anthony Panzera, an excellent draftsman and teacher at Hunter College, on New York's Upper East Side. He is a man of dignity and warmth, and I enjoy chatting with
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  • The Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco’s Legion of Honor hosted this exhibition of work by master artist Leonardo da Vinci. Figural Sketches by Leonardo da Vinci ca. 1505, pen and black ink drawing with traces of black chalk on paper. Collection
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  • This Toronto artist has spent the last three years exploring abstraction of the human figure, blending his classical training with a new approach. Red Boot by Brian Smith, oil, 36 x 24. by Bob Bahr Brian Smith is classically trained and has been drawing
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  • Mark Leithauser collaborated with his brother, the poet Brad Leithauser, on a series of books that expanded his imaginative powers, leading him to consider a multitude of new subjects. A 2002–2003, graphite drawing. All artwork this article courtesy
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  • Welcome to the new American Artist Quick Sketches blog! Readers of our print magazine should recognize the name "Quick Sketches" and will most likely see similarities between the department in American Artist and this blog. We'll use this
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  • One of the most useful aspects of painting workshops is the personalized critiques offered by knowledgeable instructors. Now you can get this advantage anytime through the American Artist Critique Blog. Through this blog, you can get commentary and suggestions
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  • Learn to draw the cube and you have a good introduction to basic perspective and drawing essentials , plus the cube is one of the geometric building blocks of all objects—including the human figure. The Three Graces by Jon deMartin, 2002, burnt
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  • I'm excited that we've started a new series in Drawing magazine around drawing basics , authored by noted artist Jon deMartin. We'd been puzzling for some time on how to offer more basic instruction to beginners while simultaneously making
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  • An artist recently included me in an e-mail blast in which he complained about the way major museums favor “Modern Art” over representational paintings by the likes of Sargent and Rembrandt. He said it “kills my soul … and I know
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  • Yesterday morning I had a wonderful conversation with Carolyn Anderson, the talented figure artist and workshop instructor from Montana who teaches at some of the top art schools around the country. I was fascinated by the amount of knowledge and insight
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  • Drawing is arguably the oldest form of visual art, but despite its long history, it still has the power to surprise. For example, the simple graphite pencil has been around for more than 200 years, but artists continue to find new methods of working with
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  • Francis Di Fronzo stopped working with paint brushes to create his own technique of “tapping the landscape into existence.” All Paths to War Lead Back to You (Part I) 2002, oil on panel, 48 x 48. Private collection. by Lynne Moss Perricelli
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  • John A. Parks examined the art of Giorgio Morandi in the December issue of American Artist . In one section, he asserted, "[His] paintings are a testimony to the act of something deeply contemplated. It is a kind of painting that has nothing to do
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  • Whether creating fine art or illustration, for Connecticut artist Bernie Fuchs—who boasts a long and successful career as an illustrator—it’s all the same. Either way, “I’m making a picture,” he explains. A Perfect
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  • While packing to move into our new offices, I came across a self-portrait I painted several years ago that was lost in a stack of papers. I immediately recognized that the face was drawn inaccurately—an error I didn’t see at the time I created
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  • This Utah artist is drawn to figures and faces, and he works hard to balance his work-related duties with his love of traditional oil painting. Kaitlyn, 2007, oil on board, 14 x 18. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise indicated
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  • Connecticut artist John Falato primarily paints in oil, but he also enjoys introducing students to the nuts and bolts of watercolor in his exciting, fast-paced beginner classes. August Road 1983, watercolor, 21 1/8 x 16. All artwork this article private
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  • Connecticut artist John Falato primarily paints in oil, but he also enjoys introducing students to the nuts and bolts of watercolor in his exciting, fast-paced beginner classes. August Road 1983, watercolor, 21 1⁄8 x 16. All artwork this article
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  • When J.C. Airoldi left a successful career as a designer, she applied the same level of determination, practicality, hard work, and marketing skills that she used in her previous profession to creating and selling paintings. Gloucester Solitude 2008,
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  • The next time you visit the nation’s capitol, add the art exhibition in the Cannon Tunnel to the list of things to see. The Cannon Tunnel is the walkway inside the U.S. Capitol building through which members of Congress, congressional staff, lobbyists
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  • Warm-up exercises are as important for artists as they are for musicians and athletes. by Daniel Grant Warm-ups for artists often involve being spontaneous, loosening up your muscles, and letting go. But jogging might work too! Athletes stretch before
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  • When Chris Krupinski made the transition from oil to watercolor painting, she refused to sacrifice her love of detail and bold, rich color. A Glass of Cherries 2004, watercolor, 30 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist. by Naomi Ekperigin
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  • Painting with watercolor requires an understanding of not only the paints themselves but also how to apply them. by James Toogood Breakers on a Rocky Coast 2005, watercolor, 24 x 18. Private collection. The predominate color in the water is Prussian blue
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  • Californian Dennis Doheny creates stunning oil landscapes by emphasizing atmospheric conditions, dramatizing the pattern of light and shadow, and “playing” with color as he sharpens detail. Doheny put a Fome-Cor mat around his plein air study
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  • Master landscape colorist Kevin Macpherson is a plein air impressionist who is passionate about sharing his skills with other artists through informative workshops, books, and DVDs. Here, he answers questions regarding his training, his technique, and
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  • Hundreds of artists from around the country sent in submissions for American Artist’s 2008 Cover Competition, and the editors narrowed the selection down to the 10 they thought best captured the skill level and style of our publication. When those
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  • Utah artist Colleen Howe is an accomplished pastelist and workshop instructor who is widely known for her sensitive and colorful landscapes of the West. Here she shares four helpful steps to achieving successful works of art. by Colleen Howe, as told
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  • Read the transcript from yesterday's live online chat with pastel artist Janet Monafo. 2008-06-09 11:00:12.0 Administrator: You have joined a chat with Janet Monafo, a top pastelist who has been highlighted in American Artist magazine. Feel free to
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  • During a recent workshop, New York artist Max Ginsburg showed students how to respond to the specific lighting effects they observed rather than to use premixed colors and repetitive procedures. by M. Stephen Doherty Ginsburg made adjustments to the balance
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  • The Frist Center for the Visual Arts, in Nashville, will host this exhibition featuring 26 drawings by four members of the Southeastern College Art Conference, an organization of art faculty committed to promoting the importance of art in higher education
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  • This dynamic young artist believes anyone can learn the language of painting and use it to express themselves, which he proves in both short-term and extended workshops. by M. Stephen Doherty Baugh working directly on a student's canvas “There
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  • Draftsmen gathered at the Manhattan venue for “BODIES…The Exhibition” last year to draw the specimens on display. The best of them were named finalists in a special competition co-sponsored by the exhibition and Drawing magazine. by
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  • We chose 10 finalists for our Drawing Magazine Cover Competition—and then easily named William Rose the winner, as he best showcased the skill level and imagination of our readers. View the winners of the Watercolor magazine 2008 cover competiton
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  • During a recent plein air workshop in Southern France, Judith Carducci helped students who worked with pen-and-ink, pastel, watercolor, and oil colors. The unifying themes of the 10-day class were that drawing basics are a foundation of all media and
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  • During nearly 30 years of interviewing landscape artists for American Artist , M. Stephen Doherty has watched hundreds of painters use a variety of materials and techniques. Here, he takes the best of that gleaned knowledge and distills it into seven
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  • Pennsylvania artist Kurt Long won the top prize in the contest, which required draftsmen to depict one of the specimens in "BODIES...The Exhibition," at New York City's South Street Seaport. Long poses beside the specimen he sketched for
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  • During a recent plein air workshop in Southern France, Judith Carducci helped students who worked with pen-and-ink, pastel, watercolor, and oil colors. The unifying themes of the 10-day class were that drawing is a foundation of all media and working
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  • This New York City artist has found that the more he understands the science of the elements in his still life scene, and the more carefully he executes his drawing and underpainting, the freer he can interpret the subject matter in the final stages to
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  • This New Mexico artist slowly builds up transparent glazes of oil colors to create still lifes and landscapes with luminous, vibrant, and subtle textures. Evening Solitude, 2008, oil on board, 15 x 15. All artwork this article private collection. by Naomi
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  • Those daunted by the skills and money needed to operate a large, bulky printing press can still explore a variety of printmaking techniques without the use of a press. by Naomi Ekperigin Winged Horse by Gail Ayres, 2003, monotype, 30 x 22. Collection
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  • In the Fall 2007 issue of Workshop magazine, we presented Daniel E. Greene's approach to teaching drawing and painting in art-school classes, short-term workshops, and filmed programs. Here we reproduce the article from the November 2007 issue of
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  • This Boston acrylic painter teaches art the way a life coach helps a client achieve life goals. by Bob Bahr Rolli advised students to keep their still life arrangement simple so the emphasis is on painting rather than drawing. Students come to Ellen Rolli
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  • James Toogood comments on Frederick Brosen's watercolor painting Brooklyn Bridge. by James Toogood Brooklyn Bridge by Frederick Brosen, 2006, watercolor over graphite, 28¾ x 51¾. Courtesy Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, New
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  • Stephen Bennett moved from New York to Mexico 15 years ago and started painting large, colorful acrylic paintings of people in his newfound community. He discovered a new direction for his life and his art, one that allows him to connect with portrait
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  • Pay careful attention to edges and incorporate foreground colors into the background to create a unified composition. by Joyce Washor Catching the Red-Eye Flight 2006, acrylic on Masonite, 16 x 20. This bird is painted very well. However, a few adjustments
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  • Several established contemporary artists have approached the subject of self-portraiture in different ways, depicting who they are or who they wish to be at various times in their lives. by Ephraim Rubenstein Self-Portrait, Matisse Print by Mary Beth
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  • Anthony Panzera comments on Antonio López García's Portrait of Maria . by Anthony Panzera Portrait of Maria by Antonio López García, 1972, graphite drawing, 28 x 21. Collection the artist. I first saw this drawing some
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  • An exhibition at The J. Paul Getty Museum, in Los Angeles, explores the way various master draftsmen used drawing to comment on society, often revealing their inner thoughts in the process. Caricature of a Man With Bushy Hair by Leonardo da Vinci, ca
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  • Janet Monafo once tossed objects onto her studio floor in an attempt to paint a more random arrangement with pastels. “I really wanted to accept whatever happened, but in the end I couldn’t resist my need to carefully organize the shapes and
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  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City, marked the renovation and reopening of the Robert Lehman Wing with an exhibition of 60 drawings by Venetian master Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and his son, Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo. Tiepolo Drawings From
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  • Anthony Panzera comments on Leonardo da Vinci's Head of the Virgin in Three-Quarter View Facing to the Right. by Anthony Panzera Head of the Virgin in Three-Quarter View Facing to the Right by Leonardo da Vinci, ca. 1510, soft black and red chalk
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  • In the summer 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how Omaha artist Kent Bellows was a masterful draftsman who took the time to contemplate a vision and complete works that would endure past his untimely death. We offer more examples of his pencil
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Sam Ivie's Cellini Revisited. Cellini Revisited by Sam Ivie, 2000, colored pencil drawing, 8 x 10. Collection the artist. Looking at Drawings: Cellini Revisited by Sam Ivie by David Jon Kassan In this small colored pencil
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Robert C. Dacey's Andrea in Shadow. Andrea in Shadow by Robert C. Dacey, charcoal drawing on Bristol board, 20 x 30. by David Jon Kassan This piece is a great figure drawing study in light and dark contrasts. It has a
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  • Anthony Panzera comments on William-Adolphe Bouguereau's A Girl in Peasant Costume, Seated, Arms Folded, Holding a Ball of Wool and Knitting Needles in her Right Hand. A Girl in Peasant Costume, Seated, Arms Folded, Holding a Ball of Wool and Knitting
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  • Artists looking to work with pastel can learn valuable techniques and tips by studying artists who first explored the medium and discovered the possibilities the medium offers. by Naomi Ekperigin Although the work of oil painters and draftsmen is well
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  • David Kassan comments on Katherine Sammons' My Mother . My Mother by Katherine Sammons, 2007, charcoal drawing, 14 x 18. by David Jon Kassan This piece is both a portrait of the artist's mother and a metaphor for the balance of opposites--light
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  • David Kassan comments on Kitty Teerling's Louisa and Connie. Connie by Kitty Teerling, 2007, pencil drawing, 4½ x 5½. Louisa by Kitty Teerling, 2007, pencil drawing, 4 x 5. by David Jon Kassan These portrait drawings by Kitty Teerling
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  • Owen Gray comments on Peter Paul Rubens' Hercules and Minerva Fighting Mars. Hercules and Minerva Fighting Mars by Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1632-1640, gouache and brush over brown ink over preliminary drawing in black chalk on light brown paper, 14
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Burton Silverman's drawing, Demonstrator. Demonstrator by Burton Silverman, 1968, charcoal drawing. by David Jon Kassan This charcoal drawing by Burton Silverman represents one of the many conceptual approaches the artist
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  • In the spring 2008 issue of Watercolor magazine, James Toogood discussed how painting with watercolor requires an understanding of not only the paints themselves but also their application. Here, we present his demonstration Mixed Emotions . Step 1 After
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  • Congratulations to the 10 finalists chosen in the 2008 Watercolor Cover Competition. These accomplished artists each take a different approach, revealing the versatility and adaptability of watermedia. Here, they describe their sources of inspiration
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  • A noted artist and instructor demonstrates how he lays down a wash, then adds darks and lifts out lights to reveal an expressive drawing. by Robert T. Barrett In the process of developing my ability to see values correctly, I became aware that very few
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Watercolor magazine, Margaret M. Martin discussed incorporating figures in her architecture and landscape scenes to help direct the viewer's eye and infuse a sense of movement and life into her paintings. Here, we offer
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  • This Brooklyn-based artist uses a combination of casein and acrylic to create paintings of considerable power. by John A. Parks Amsterdam II 2007, casein and acrylic, 10 x 20. Collection the artist. Elizabeth Daggar makes austere paintings that reveal
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  • Ali Cavanaugh discovered a clay-covered panel that accepts watermedia and helps her create richly nuanced figure paintings. A Boat for You Within My Arms 2008, watercolor, 30 x 30. Courtesy Wally Workman Gallery, Austin, Texas. by Lynne Moss Perricelli
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  • Alan Flattmann presents a quick a step by step demonstration of his painting The Abita River. Step 1 Flattmann toned the canvas with a thin wash of burnt-umber acrylic paint. The artist drew the landscape with vine charcoal, sprayed the drawing with Krylon
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  • Artists Carl and Sandra Bryant use tiny pieces of glass to create intricate mosaic works of art. by Stephanie Kaplan Autumn Landscape by Sandra Bryant, 2006, glass mosaic, 24 x 32. Collection the artist. Mosaic Landscape by Sandra Bryant, 2005, glass
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  • This New York City artist paints landscapes, still lifes, and portraits that highlight the relationships between seemingly disparate objects. by Naomi Ekperigin This Situation 2006, oil, 20 x 16. All artwork this article collection the artist. Self-Portrait
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  • Carefully choosing the right drawing tools for a given subject gives a draftsman a tremendous advantage. by Bob Bahr CLOCKWISE FROM TOP A bottle of walnut ink and a bamboo pen, four colors of Conté crayons (bistre, sanguine, black, and white),
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  • As one studies drawing, it can be useful to learn from masters that came before in order to gain inspiration and find ways of approaching challenges that arise. For those discovering drawing, there are several master draftsmen one can learn from. by Naomi
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  • For this Massachusetts artist, water is both her subject and her medium. Iceberg From Our Zodiac, Antarctica No. 2 2005, watercolor, 24 x 36. All artwork this article collection the artist, unless otherwise indicated. by Naomi Ekperigin The majority of
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  • Denise LaRue Mahlke believes that being an artist is a calling that involves preserving, celebrating, and sharing in God’s creation. That’s one of the reasons she challenges herself to strive for excellence as a pastel painter and a teacher
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  • This New York City artist’s creative process involves self-reflection, during which she asks herself not only what she is painting, but also why she’s compelled to do so. by Naomi Ekperigin Daniel I 2006, oil on linen, 22 x 18. Collection
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  • This Nebraska artist went from scientific illustration to still lifes and figures that enable him to examine life in a new way. Cranberries 2008, oil, 24 x 16. Collection the artist. by Naomi Ekperigin Mark Marcuson is an equal-opportunity artist. Having
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  • This Maryland artist always paints from life, creating work that gives personality and history to inanimate objects. Apartment Fridge 2001, acrylic on panel, 5 x 7. All artwork this article private collection. by Naomi Ekperigin Nick Clulow paints household
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  • This artist, who primarily paints landscapes in transparent watercolor, finds the unpredictability of the medium to be its most enjoyable trait. by Naomi Ekperigin Cascade 2004, watercolor, 19 x 28. All artwork this article private collection unless otherwise
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  • Students at the Community College of Philadelphia receive thorough instruction in the fundamentals of drawing and painting, especially those currently enrolled in Jeffrey Reed’s introductory course, Art 115—Painting I. by M. Stephen Doherty
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  • The finalists for the Cover Competitions have been chosen. The winners for each magazine will be announced in the print editions of upcoming issues of American Artist, Watercolor, and Drawing. The finalists are currently being interviewed by American
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  • Ephraim Rubenstein discusses Michelangelo's The Risen Christ and The Resurrection of Christ. by Ephraim Rubenstein The Risen Christ by Michelangelo, ca. 1513, black chalk drawing, 16 x 10. Collection the British Museum, London, England. The Resurrection
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  • This Massachusetts painter uses a closely controlled palette and open painting approach to create highly evocative visions of interiors and figures. by John A. Parks Family at Sundown 2005, oil on linen, 48 x 72. All artwork this article collection the
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  • Utah artist David Koch likes to bring elements of his state’s pioneer past into his computer-aided compositions. by Linda S. Price Crossing The Sweetwater 2002, oil on linen, 55 x 44. Collection Walt and Katie Gasser. Until David Koch won a competition
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  • An appropriate background is essential for setting the scene in a still life composition. by Janet Walsh Silver Server With Cups 2002, acrylic, 12 x 24. The artist has done a nice job painting these still life items. However, the artist may want to consider
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  • Modulate contrast to keep the attention on the focal point. by Dawn Whitelaw The Old Man Pastel, 23 x 17. The artist has done an excellent job with this pastel portrait—the drawing and the use of color are quite effective. My only suggestion would
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  • Consider value choices carefully when painting figures. by Dawn Whitelaw The Mother Wore Green (at the Wedding) 2007, acrylic, 12 x 16. The critic manipulated the image in Photoshop to demonstrate how to alter the values of the bodies. I like the energy
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  • Learn about working with water-soluble pencils from Kristy Ann Kutch, author of Drawing and Painting With Colored Pencil (Watson-Guptill Publications, New York, New York). by Kristy Ann Kutch Water-soluble colored drawing products include: 1) watercolor
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  • In 1994 New York City pastelist Sam Goodsell returned to the art world after nine years away, determined to fully explore the challenging and rewarding genre of figure painting. His dedication is paying off. To read more features like this, subscribe
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  • his Wyoming artist has a simple message—“put the right color in the right place, and use interesting shapes”—that unfolds into much fuller, useful instruction in his workshops. by Bob Bahr Jim Wilcox advised a student during a
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  • In the fall 2007 issue of Watercolor , Johnnie Liliedahl discussed Old Master approaches that help her students understand the basics of oil painting. Here, we present a demonstration for her painting Lady in White. Reference: A photograph of a model
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  • This painter, who works in egg tempera, creates figurative work that taps into themes and relationships both personal and universal. by Naomi Ekperigin La Esperanza 2007, egg tempera, 11 x 14. Collection the artist. “My subject matter at the moment
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  • James Toogood comments on Thomas Eakins' watercolor painting John Biglin in a Single Scull. by James Toogood John Biglin in a Single Scull by Thomas Eakins, ca. 1873, watercolor (and gouache?), 19 5/16 x 24 7/8. Collection The Metropolitan Museum
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  • Ohio artist J. Todd Anderson took his talent for drawing to Hollywood and, as a storyboard artist, became part of the award-winning Coen Brothers movie-making team, creating the storyboards for such movies as Raising Arizona and No Country for Old Men
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  • About 25% of the human body's bones are in the foot, a vitally important structure for a biped. Here's a drawing tutorial about what draftsmen need to know to draw the foot and depict its function convincingly. by David Jon Kassan Bone Outstep
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  • Read the transcript from yesterday's live online chat and drawing tutorial with colored pencil artist Arlene Steinberg. Be sure to attend our next live chat with pastel artist Janet Monafo on Monday, June 9 at 2pm EST. 2008-05-12 11:00:03.0 Administrator
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  • In her colored pencil and graphite drawings, Dee Overly invites viewers to admire the unique details of natural objects. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Raindrops 2007, colored pencil drawing, 8½ x 7. This piece won second place in American Artist’s
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  • Here are some ways to give depth to your drawings. by Bob Bahr A Grove of Pine Trees With a Ruined Tower by Claude Lorrain, 1638â??1639, pen and brown ink with brown, gray, and pink wash on white paper, 12â? x 8¾. Collection
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Käthe Kollwitz's Self-Portrait. Self-Portrait By Käthe Kollwitz, 1924, lithograph drawing. by David Jon Kassan This drawing exemplifies the term that less is more. This is a straightforward, austere pencil sketch
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Michelangelo's Male Nude . Male Nude by Michelangelo Buonarroti, ca.1504, black chalk drawing heightened with lead white, 16 x 9. Collection Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands. Looking at Drawings: "Male Nude
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  • New Jersey artist Sissi Siska reinvents traditional silk-painting techniques to create multimedia works of art. by Stephanie Kaplan Orchids on Blue Ferns 2005, dyes, gutta, and wax on crepe de chine silk, 6’ x 3’. Collection the artist. Detail
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Nicolai Fechin's Manuelita. Manuelita by Nicolai Fechin, ca. 1930, charcoal drawing on off-white paper. by David Jon Kassan This drawing by Nicolai Fechin likely served as a study for a painting and is a great observation
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  • This Illinois artist creates oil paintings that juxtapose industrial spaces and figures in ambiguous settings. Yardwatcher 2001, oil, 30 x 35¾. All artwork this article collection the artist. by Naomi Ekperigin Todd Snyder was born and raised in
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  • The winner and semifinalists of our annual cover competition reveal how they created paintings that captured the attention of our judges. Frank J. Strazzulla Jr. Studio Interior 2003, oil, 18 x 14. Private collection “One of the compelling themes
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  • The 10 Finalists in the Watercolor Cover Competition offer their insights on the creative process—from finding inspired subjects to selecting materials to applying the final details. Cymbidium Equinox by Kory Fluckiger, 2004, watercolor, 27 x 19
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  • It was tough, but we chose 10 finalists who best showcase the skill level and imagination of our readers and named Noel A. Carmack the Drawing Magazine Cover Competition Winner for 2006. Noel A. Carmack Shannon by Noel A. Carmack, 2006, black colored
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  • Careful use of darks and lights within and around the figure can give your drawings more power and dramatic force. by Dan Gheno Laocoön by Baccio Bandinelli, red and black chalk, 21 x 15¾. Collection the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy. Some
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  • Arlene Steinberg develops her detailed colored pencil drawings in much the same way as an oil painter would proceed. She carefully determines a composition, builds from dark shadows to bright highlights, and underpaints complementary colors to enrich
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  • Painting the expressiveness of a person’s mouth helps establish his or her likeness, personality, and vitality in a portrait, yet many artists have difficulty representing that facial feature. Here’s how I teach students to paint a mouth in
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Costa Vavagiakis' Connie XXI . Connie XXI by Costa Vavagiakis, 2005, graphite and white chalk drawing on gray paper, 16½ x 11½. by David Jon Kassan This drawing by Costa Vavagiakis was done with graphite heightened
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Jean-Baptist Greuze's Study of the Head of an Old Man. Study of the Head of an Old Man by Jean-Baptiste Greuze, ca. 1765, red chalk, 15? x 12?. Collection J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California. Looking at Drawings
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  • One of Carla O’Connor’s objectives in a workshop is to persuade students to stop thinking about the tools of watermedia painting—the brushes, paints, and paper—and to focus on expression. To her, focusing on materials is like wondering
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  • Midwestern artist Christopher Copeland paints the landscape that surrounds him, imbuing it with emotion and recording the transient moments that are often difficult to capture. by Naomi Ekperigin Midsummer Evening 2007, oil, 30 x 32. Private collection
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  • Known for his innovative method of using transparent watercolor on a nonabsorbent surface, this California artist employs an open-ended approach. Like what you read? Subscribe to Watercolor today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli Sunday Morning Nougat 2003, watercolor
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  • An elegant combination of traditional tonalism and contemporary design allows Utah artist Shanna Kunz to speak to her viewers in a gently alluring voice. by Jennifer King Christmas Meadows 2003, watercolor, 20 x 24. Private collection. “All of your
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  • In this installment of the demonstration, the artist works on the details in the portrait. The little girl was close to where I wanted her to be, but the older girl seemed a little too dark. I needed to add a white glaze over her just to send it in the
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  • As one studies a new medium, it can be useful to learn about the process of masters that came before in order to gain inspiration and insight into tackling various techniques. Here we focus on the great watercolorists of the past. Mink Pond by Winslow
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  • In the second installment of the demonstration, Herrick tones his canvas and begins blocking in the heads of the children. I didn’t do a drawing—I did most of my thinking with the camera and Photoshop, and then I just jumped right into things
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  • Follow Garth Herrick's entire demonstration from start to finish. Meeting the Client This came through an agent, a local representative of Portrait Source [a portrait broker]. I think the client found me in the agent’s portfolio. The couple
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  • Follow Garth Herrick's entire demonstration from start to finish. Meeting the Client This came through an agent, a local representative of Portrait Source [a portrait broker]. I think the client found me in the agent’s portfolio. The couple
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  • In the spring 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we explored how the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts puts students on the path to become artists, teaching them drawing basics and then taking them beyond. In this online exclusive gallery, we offer more
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  • Many artists work within the confines of their studios or homes, making it difficult to connect with colleagues. Below are different ways beginning artists can enter the social dimension of the art world. by Naomi Ekperigin Art Classes and Workshops Attending
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  • In the spring 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how Maine artist Janvier Rollande found that a bit of herself always came through in her pencil drawings of others. We offer more of her graphite portraits in this online exclusive gallery. Tapestry
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  • In this online exclusive, read more about the history of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts as a supplement to the spring 2008 Drawing magazine feature article. by Tina Tammaro In 1791 artist Charles Willson Peale began to gather a group of prominent
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  • Urban landscape painter Scott Prior proves that a contemporary, “punk-rock” alternative to classical California subject matter can still produce moving and thought-provoking imagery. by James A. Metcalfe Island Life 2007, oil, 24 x 18. Courtesy
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  • In this online exclusive gallery, we offer more colored pencil drawings by spring 2008 featured artist Dee Overly. Hiding 2006, colored pencil, 7 x 6. Collection Cathy Barry. Rain Beads 2007, colored pencil, 8½ x 7. Collection the artist. Peaches
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  • Varying color and subduing the background helps create an effective floral composition. by Janet Walsh Geraniums 2005, acrylic, 8 x 10. The artist has certainly made good color choices in the bouquet, and has created the feeling of sunlight throughout
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  • Californian Patricia A. Hannaway stresses that the best drawings of living things honor the action line and gesture, suggesting their movements in the recent past, present, and future. This dynamic, cinematic approach makes sense for someone who has made
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  • Use negative space on both sides of the canvas to create a unified composition. by Elizabeth Pruitt Bleu 2007, acrylic, 36 x 24. The artist has created interesting negative shapes on the left side of the painting where the flowers go off the canvas. The
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  • Indicating a light source is essential to painting 3D objects. by Elizabeth Pruitt The Moroccan Vase 2006, acrylic, 19 x 12. This piece is reminiscent of Picasso's work. The eye travels nicely down the curving line of the vase in the foreground. However
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  • In the fall 2007 issue of Workshop , Gayle Levée discussed how the underlying structure of a painting gives the finished work its strength. Here we present a demonstration for her painting Reflections in Gold . To read the feature article on Levée
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  • Massachusetts-based artist Andrew DeVries controls every aspect of his career, from casting his own bronzes to running his own art gallery. Like what you read? Become an American Artist subscriber today! by John A. Parks Heavenly 2005, bronze, 19 x 18
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  • This Illinois-based artist has a degree in animation but found her true calling was painting portraits and still lifes in oil. by Naomi Ekperigin Hurricane Lamp With Candle 2006, oil, 9 x 12. Collection the artist. Lindsey Tull is a young artist who has
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  • The Bay Area Classical Artist Atelier, just outside of San Francisco, began with one woman’s dream to establish a school steeped in the traditions of the European ateliers of the past. Today the atelier is one of the most regarded classical contemporary
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  • Heralded as a rebel of the Romantic movement, Gustave Courbet is today considered one of the first to propel Realism into the modern world. by John A. Parks The Desperate Man 1844–1845, oil, 17¾ x 21?. Private collection. Born in 1819, Gustave
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  • In the December 2007 issue of American Artist, Joseph Gyurcsak used the work of Giorgio Morandi and Paul Cézanne to help illustrate lessons on developing paintings. Here, we present a step by step demonstration of his painting Subtle Grays . The
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  • In the spring 2008 issue of Workshop magazine , we explored how students at the Community College of Philadelphia received instruction in the fundamentals of drawing and painting in Jeffrey Reed's introductory course. In this online exclusive gallery
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  • Six top artists combined observation, investigation, and invention to respond to the encompassing reality of the landscape. They will be exhibiting their sketches and studio paintings together for the first time this summer. by M. Stephen Doherty The
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on George Bellows' A Stag at Sharkey's. A Stag at Sharkey’s by George Bellows, 1917, lithograph, 18½ x 23. This lithograph drawing by George Bellows was based on an earlier painting of the same name done
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  • Because most of his Pennsylvania landscapes begin with his photographs, Peter Fiore considers his paintings reorchestrations of reality. “A painting is what I envision,” he says, “not necessarily what nature gave me.” by Linda
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  • A look at the anatomical structure of the neck, and some helpful figure drawing tips from Drawing magazine's Understanding Anatomy series. Read other features in the Understanding Anatomy series: Drawing the Leg Drawing the Ear Drawing the Arm by
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  • For almost 20 years, Jimmy Sanders has set specific goals for his art education, the types of paintings he creates, and the projects he undertakes. “Goals are dreams with deadlines,” he says. “They are important to realist painters who
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  • In the May 2008 issue of American Artist, we explored how Arlene Steinberg developed her detailed colored pencil drawings in much the same way as an oil painter would proceed. We present more of her drawings in this online exclusive gallery. All Paired
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses John Singer Sargent's Male Back . Male Back by John Singer Sargent, charcoal drawing. Drawn between 1890-1915. by David Jon Kassan While most artists will rely on how light describes form in their figure drawings , John
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  • Twenty-five architectural drawings created by Richard Morris Hunt between 1847 and 1863 were on display at the National Academy Museum . Hunt, often referred to as "the dean of American architecture," was the first American to study architecture
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  • An artist's handling of edges is one of the drawing basics and of great importance if a drawing is to be convincing. Tartar Huntsman by Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1616, black chalk heightened with white, 15 1/16 x 10 9/16. Collection The Fizwilliam Museum
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  • Having completed more than 400 watercolor portraits of children, Jane Paul Angelhart knows how to avoid potential problems with muddy paints, uncharacteristic poses, nervous children, and overbearing mothers. Like what you read? Become a Watercolor subscriber
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  • In this online exclusive gallery, view more examples of Philip Pearlstein's work that highlight the draftsmanship and drawing skills described in his winter 2008 Drawing feature. Jerusalem, Kidron Valley 1987-88, woodcut, 40 x 119. Collection the
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Dan Thompson's Study for Mirror (I against I) . Study for Mirror (I Against I) by Dan Thompson, graphite. Collection unknown. This served as a study for a self-portrait. Looking at Drawings: "Study for Mirror (I Against
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  • Renowned for his watercolor paintings of the figure, this artist reminds others to simplify, merge the subject with the background, and respond in a way that is natural and authentic. To read more features like this, subscribe to Watercolor today! Watercolor
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  • From the thousands of art-instruction books available, we offer a list of those that have proven beneficial to new artists. by Naomi Ekperigin There are many options available for artists wishing to improve their skills. However, the price and time commitment
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  • We present biographies and artwork from our 20 esteemed watercolor teachers. by Beth Patterson Mary Alice Braukman The Power of Letting Go by Mary Alice Braukman, 2005, mixed media and collage, 22 x 30. Collection the artist. Mary Alice Braukman is an
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  • This New York artist discovers many of his breakthroughs through drawings, depicting strictly what he sees with little thought for accepted standards of draftsmanship. by John A. Parks Study for Eroded Cliff 1955, sepia wash on paper, 18¾ x 23
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  • Throughout his long career, Henry Casselli has looked to drawings to clarify his impressions and better understand his subject. To read more features like this, subscribe to Drawing today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli Study for Sparring Partner 2005, graphite
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how Anthony Mitri and Mary Reilly, who work in charcoal and graphite respectively, mastered the drawing essentials to develop a personal vision and unique style through their drawings of New York
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  • New Hampshire artist Roland Simard takes papermaking to the next level with his pulp paintings. by Stephanie Kaplan Shadow Pool 2007, fiber, 24 x 18. Collection the artist. New Hampshire artist Roland Simard’s paintings are all about creating layers
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  • This New York artist uses the sheen of graphite to create the light highlights in her drawings on black paper. by Bob Bahr Study of a Roman Sculpture 2007, graphite on black paper, 50 x 33. Collection the artist. Twilight by Sherry Camhy, 2006, graphite
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  • by John Rutherford Exhausted Surgeon 2002, Conté and acrylic, 17 x 21. All artwork this article collection the artist. My approach to figure drawing allows me to work quickly in establishing both the linear outlines of the model’s form and
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  • The pencil manufacturer Caran d’Ache agreed to share their pencil-making process with Drawing readers through the following photographs, so that artists are informed about their materials and can use them when solidifying their mastery of all drawing
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  • We present the semifinalists in the pastel category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Changing Channels by Mike Barret Kolasinski, 2007, pastel on archival foam board, 12 x 24. First Place: Mike Barret Kolasinski Chicago artist Mike Barret Kolasinski is passionate
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  • For this new feature, we've asked artists to comment on some of their favorite drawings. In this first edition, David Jon Kassan comments on Head Study of a Young Girl by John H. VanderPoel. Head Study of a Young Girl by John H. VanderPoel, 1903,
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  • Combining close observation with an intuitive approach, Joyce Washor creates tiny paintings with big impact. To read more features like this, subscribe to Watercolor today! by Tina Tammaro My Cup Runneth Over III 2007, watercolor, 4¾ x 3¾
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  • by Christopher Willard Since acrylics were introduced in the 1950s, a wide variety of mediums and additives have been designed. Experimenting with these materials in conjunction with acrylics can often lead to new ways of working and produce a variety
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  • Pay careful attention to color temperature. by Elizabeth Pruitt Maddy No. 1 2006, pastel on acid-free foam board, 24 x 20. The artist has achieved an intimate feeling in this paintingâ??itâ??s as if the viewer is drawn into the horseâ
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  • Deciding where to place the elements in a painting can be difficult, but the decisions are crucial to creating a successful piece. by Naomi Ekperigin Deciding where to place the elements in a painting can be difficult, but the decisions are crucial to
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  • Despite the demands of her busy life, Arizona watercolorist Carole Hillsbery finds time to paint thoughtfully executed watercolors. by Linda S. Price Puerto Penasco 2006, watercolor, 30 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise
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  • Drawing is critical to Gary Akers’ creative process, helping him to know the subject, decide the value structure and composition, and define the focal point. Like what you read? Become a Watercolor subscriber today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli The
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  • Read more information about the arts in Colorado in conjunction with the spring 2008 Workshop magazine feature on Ron Hicks' Denver workshop. by Allison Malafronte Jeanne Mackenzie conducted a plein air landscape workshop through Cottonwood Artists’
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  • When Rhode Island artist Peter Hussey taught himself to paint, he noticed that great artists often used diagonal and curved shapes to bring viewers into and around their pictures. That lesson, along with many others he learned by studying both historic
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  • Many of the great teachers who trained Daniel Graves were featured in American Artist in the 1970s, while he and his students have been profiled in more recent issues. As the magazine celebrates its 70th anniversary, we examine the academic art education
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  • This past summer, 30 outstanding young artists were invited to spend three weeks studying the landscape in upstate New York, where they applied their figure-drawing skills to rendering nature. The intention of the four instructors was to revive the approach
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  • Break up strong lines when possible to add interest. by Elizabeth Pruitt Looking South— Hollywood Beach, Florida Acrylic, 36 x 24. This painting has a nice composition. However, the diagonal line that runs from the lower, left corner should be irregular
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  • We present the semifinalists in the acrylic category. by Karen Stanger Johnston First Place: Amy Guidry Out for a Run by Amy Guidry, 2006, acrylic, 20 x 24. Courtesy Jenkins Connelly Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana. "I choose my subjects based on
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  • Maryland artist Mark Karnes paints everyday scenes by sketching value studies in ink or watercolor then slowly painting in oil or acrylic without a detailed preparatory drawing. by Ephraim Rubenstein Dining Room Cloudy Day 2005, acrylic on board, 16 x
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how New York City artist Julia Randall's colored pencil drawings incorporated depictions of her mouth. We present more of her voyeuristic, suggestive, slightly grotesque, and humorous drawings
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  • Likening her process for painting flowers to that of her portraits, Maine artist Susan Van Campen puts patience, skill, and heart into interpreting the life of a flower. by Allison Malafronte Bouquet, June 2006, watercolor, 42 x 29½. All artwork
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  • This French master teaches us much about contours, portraiture, and how to draw people. by Mark G. Mitchell Portrait of Charles- François Mallet 1809, graphite, 10 9/16 x 8 5/16. Collection The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. So that’s
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  • After a successful 20-year career as a watercolorist in Tulsa, Patrick Gordon moved to New York to create large, multipanel oil paintings of flowers. “I’ve never worked harder or had more fun than I have in the past few years,” he explains
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  • Texas cattle rancher Lonnie Shan depicts the animals he admires in stunning watercolors, taking great care to capture their personality and soul. by Naomi Ekperigin Hard is the Journey 1991, watercolor, 14 x 10. Collection the artist. Viewing one of Lonnie
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  • With limited time to paint, pastelist Dave Stout has learned to pare down his supplies and develop an efficient and effective working method. Like what you read? Become an American Artist subscriber today! by Linda S. Price Back to the Clouds 2006, pastel
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  • Water-soluble colored pencils offer the perfect solution for artists who want to create watercolor effects without the hassle of watercolor paints. by Stephanie Kaplan Plumeria 2006, watercolor pencil, 8 x 10. Watercolorist Kristy Ann Kutch owned a set
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we explored how Henry Casselli has looked to drawings to clarify his impressions and better understand his subject throughout his long career. Here, we offer more of his portrait drawings in this online exclusive
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  • A more finished drawing is possible when a model poses for an extended amount of time, but this luxury comes with particular challenges. Identifying and preparing for the potential pitfalls will improve your figure drawing . To read more features like
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  • In the fall 2007 issue of Drawing magazine, we highlighted the Bay Area Classical Artist Atelier as one of the most regarded classical contemporary schools in the country, offering students traditional figure-drawing training from today’s top artist
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  • Selecting a palette of colors often means limiting the choices, making studies, and experimenting along the way. by Christopher Willard One of the keys to successful watercolor painting is to choose a workable set of colors. Today, with the wide range
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  • This web-based art program seeks to explore drawing basics as essential modes of education not only in the United Kingdom but all over the world. July 22, 2007, Sunset in Verona at Ponte by Victor Timofeev, 2007, pen-and-ink and graphite, 9½ x
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  • We present the semifinalists in the mixed media category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Lunch on 6th Ave. by Paul Sullivan, 2005, watercolor and acrylic, 22½ x 15. First Place: Paul Sullivan Paul Sullivan uses acrylic paint to preserve the parts of
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  • Although viewers may first be attracted to the beautiful and romantic subjects of Steve Hanks’ extraordinarily detailed watercolors, they soon become engaged by the expressions of love, loss, and hope conveyed by the images. That’s because
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  • Albert Handell, one of the most important artists working in pastel today, was the subject of a retrospective exhibition at The Butler Institute of American Art. Here, he describes some of the seminal paintings in the show and his continuing exploration
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  • Read the transcript from our online chat with mutimedia artist Fran Hardy. 2007-07-26 12:00:14.0 Administrator: You have joined a chat with Fran Hardy, an artist who transforms her graphite drawings into remarkable multimedia pieces that incorporate sgraffito
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  • Many great landscape drawings were created as preparatory studies, educational exercises, or informational journals and not as finished works of art. We can now study those freely made graphic images for evidence of the drawing essentials , ideas, and
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  • View a demonstration of Kristy Ann Kutch's Farmers’ Market Peonies to take a closer look at her watercolor pencil technique. View a demonstration of Kristy Ann Kutch's Farmers’ Market Peonies to get a closer look at her wet-in-wet
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  • Richard L. Feigen & Co., in collaboration with Jan Krugier Gallery, in New York City, presents this exhibition of 60 modern and contemporary works by such artists as Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Julio Gonzalez, and Joaquin Torres-Garcia. Drawing
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  • The Bernarducci Meisel Gallery, in New York City, presents this third solo exhibition of still life paintings by Roberto Bernardi. Roberto Bernardi: New Still Life Paintings Through December 1 Bernarducci Meisel Gallery New York, New York (212) 593-3757
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  • by Bob Bahr Head of the Virgin in Three-Quarter View Facing to the Right by Leonardo da Vinci, 1508–1512, black and red chalk on paper, 8 x 6?. Collection The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York. Leonardo filled the sheet with the subject’s
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  • In the June 2007 issue of American Artist, we discussed how the large charcoal drawings that Montana artist David C. Powers creates on toned pano Artistico hot-pressed watercolor paper are inspired by the feelings of danger, freedom, solitude, and the
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  • In our Techniques to Try section, we examine how Brenda Turner's passion for painting gouache on Arches black cover stock opens up a wide array of creative possibilities. Here, we show a step-by-step demonstration of her technique. Step 1 Turner first
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  • Using his skills in drawing and his training as an architect, Adam Van Doren is able to make precise drawings of buildings, yet he refrains from painting every surface and detail. In this online exclusive gallery, we present more of his exquisite watercolors
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  • By employing a most unusual form of contrast, Yachiyo Beck has found a way to create still lifes with a distinctly personal flavor. by Jennifer King Afternoon Apples 2005, watercolor, 18 x 28. Collection the artist. If one of her paintings looked like
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  • Santa Barbara artist Ann Sanders finds natural beauty in her surroundings and puts it down in pastel using proven methods—and she stresses that you can too. by Bob Bahr Devereux Afternoon 2006, pastel, 11 x 15. Collection Shirley Dettmann. The scenes
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  • Catherine Smith, an artist in Providence, strives to capture the perceived personality of an animal, with a healthy dose of whimsy. by Bob Bahr Lord Dominus 2006, acrylic, 18 x 14. All artwork this article collection the artist. Lady Gladrigs 2006, acrylic
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  • There are few American painters who were as celebrated, successful, or influential as Frederic Edwin Church. by M. Stephen Doherty Twilight, a Sketch by Frederic Edwin Church, 1858, oil, 8¼ x 12¼. Collection Olana State Historic Site, Hudson
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  • Two masters of still life painting have much to teach us about developing our paintings. by Joseph Gyurcsak Ochre & Blue Gray 2007, oil, 12 x 16. Collection the artist. Two of the most admired masters of still life painting are the Italian artist
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  • This exhibition features work by four renowned contemporary artists and selected pieces created by the Old Masters, chosen specifically to compare and contrast the historical with the modern. Drawing Connections: Baselitz, Kelly, Penone, Rockburne, and
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  • Most artists are familiar with the axiom that states there is art created for commerce’s sake and art created for art’s sake, but few are able to find a happy medium between the two. by Daniel Grant Most artists are familiar with the axiom
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  • Thank you to everyone who voted! Congratulations to Readers' Choice Competition winner Yimeng Ling for her watercolor Autumn Wind. Winners by Medium Best of Acrylic Best of Colored Pencil Best of Drawing Best of Mixed Media Spinning Lesson by Bryana
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  • This Dominican-born artist uses rich color to create an exotic and intense experience of the world. by John A. Parks Standing Nude Study 1988, oil, 20 x 16. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise indicated. Although he has long
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  • John P. Smolko won the Grand Prize—a new MetroShed, furnished by Blick Art Materials, for use as a stand-alone studio—for his imaginative colored pencil piece, Homage to Klimt (The Virgin). Read more about the artist, and view five online
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  • We present the semifinalists in the drawing category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Study for the Portrait of Autumn by Chusit Wijarnjoragij, 2007, brown and white colored pencil, 25 x 19. First Place: Chusit Wijarnjoragij For Thailand-born Chusit Wijarnjoragij
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  • We present the semifinalists in the watercolor category. by Karen Stanger Johnston After the Harvest by Gail M. Wheaton, 2003, watercolor, 30 x 22. Collection Evan and Patricia Harter. First Place: Gail M. Wheaton Arizona artist Gail M. Wheaton completed
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  • Painting light accurately can be a challenge in landscape painting. by Shawn Gould Reflecting at Sunset 2006, acrylic, 24 x 24. This is a beautiful painting with nice light, however the sun's highlight is a little too bright. Since the light falls
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  • To use the legs expressively in his or her own work, an artist has to be able to draw them from a multitude of positions and every possible angle. Here's a quick overview of the anatomy of the human leg. by Ephraim Rubenstein Three Studies of a Right
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  • Randy Simmons, our Artist of the Month for February, draws inspiration for his charcoal drawings from three sources: his children, his current and past romantic relationships, and domestic violence. by Edith Zimmerman Corona 2006, charcoal, 52 x 65. All
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  • Pay attention to lights and darks when painting landscapes. by Shawn Gould California Seascape acrylic, 22 x 28. The artist has done a nice job with the composition—the viewer’s eye follows the land out to sea and is brought back into the
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  • Careful consideration of color value and saturation are important in a unified composition. by Shawn Gould Blue Violets of Provence 2006, acrylic, 20 x 20. The artist has done an excellent job bringing the viewer into the painting with the use of rich
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  • Renowned watercolorist and workshop instructor Mary Whyte offers readers five tips for creating dynamic works of art in any medium. To read more features like this, subscribe to American Artist today! by Mary Whyte Bean Soup 2006, watercolor, 38 x 28
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  • This year, for the first time, the Cape Cod Museum of Art (CCMA) will present “Representing Reality: What the Eye Sees—What the Mind Knows,” Thursday, August 23 through Friday, August 24. Cape Cod Museum of Art’s First National
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  • Laguna College of Art & Design, in Laguna Beach, California, recently announced the winners of its Student Juried Exhibition. Laguna College of Art & Design Exhibition Winners Announced Laguna College of Art & Design , in Laguna Beach, California
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  • We present the semifinalists in the colored pencil category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Ya Reckin by Rosemarie Rush, 2006, colored pencil, 16 x 20. First Place: Rosemarie Rush Like most of the images of Western life by California artist Rosemarie Rush
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  • We present the semifinalists in the printmaking category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Eulogy for Kreischerville by Bill Murphy, 2006, etching, 11 x 21. Image courtesy The Old Print Shop, New York, New York. Collection Newark Public Library, Newark, New
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  • Santa Fe artist Doug Higgins has many strategies for directing the viewer’s eye toward the center of interest and leading it around the painting. by Linda S. Price Painting at Smith Cove 2004, oil, 20 x 24. All artwork this article collection the
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  • We present the semifinalists in the oil category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Hyacinth (and the McCoy Pot) by Ellen Buselli, 2006, oil on linen, 12 x 16. Private collection. First Place: Ellen Buselli Ellen Buselli’s favorite subject is the still
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  • Prud’hon drew from the figure throughout his career, and now those “académies” anchor his reputation. How did he draw such stunning figure studies? by Ephraim Rubenstein Standing Nude charcoal heightened with white chalk on blue
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  • During the second half of the 19th century a single writer held enormous sway over the hearts and minds of American artists, critics, and their public. by John A. Parks Devonport and Dockyard, Devonshire by Joseph Mallord William Turner, 1825–1829
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  • Ingres taught us much about contours and portraiture. Here, we offer an excerpt from the feature about how the artist's use of graphite on smooth white paper was ahead of his time. by Mark G. Mitchell Portrait of La Principessa Fiano 1817, graphite
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  • It is important to consider the background color in a portrait. by Dawn Whitelaw Kate Menendez 2006, pastel, 21 x 19. The critic created an adjusted version of the painting in Photoshop to supplement her critique. This artist asked for help with the background
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  • Juggling dozens of commissions at once, Peter Paul Rubens and his staff created hundreds of dynamic drawings and oil sketches. by John A. Parks Self-portrait 1638–1640, oil, 43 x 33½. Collection Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria.
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  • This expatriate American turned away from realism to create an art of stylish and ethereal beauty, ably represented in his drawings. by John A. Parks Crouching Figure in The White Symphony: Three Girls 1869-1870, chalk on brown paper, 10 5/8 x 10¾
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  • The greatest of Dutch masters used a rapid, abbreviated technique in drawing to record visual impressions from the world around him and his own cornucopian imagination, foreshadowing developments in modern art more than two centuries later. by Joseph
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  • Primarily an oil painter, Elizabeth O’Reilly makes a point of painting the figure in watercolor, where she stretches her painting skills to solve new kinds of problems. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Large Woman With Umbrella 2006, watercolor, 16¼
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  • Some of Ingres' most prized advice about the art of drawing. “To draw does not mean simply to reproduce contours; drawing does not consist merely of line: drawing is also expression. The inner form, the plane, modeling. See what remains after
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  • The Frick Collection, in New York City, and the Louvre, in Paris, co-organized this exhibition of work by French artist Gabriel de Saint-Aubin. Gabriel de Saint-Aubin (1724–1780) Through January 27, 2008 The Frick Collection New York, New York
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  • Chicago’s School of Representational Art offers a classical art education in a modern world. by Mark G. Mitchell Tartan by Steve Ohlrich, 1999, charcoal and pastel on white paper, 25 x 19. On the top floor of an old factory warehouse in the arts
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  • Faintly draw construction lines to remind yourself of the parts of the form you don't see. by Bob Bahr Contour of a Woman Relaxing by Alex Zwarenstein, 2002, graphite, 20 x 30. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise indicated
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  • Liz Haywood-Sullivan relies on several techniques to ensure she consistently achieves rich, velvety darks. View an online exlcusive gallery of Haywood-Sullivan's work. by Christopher Willard Southwest Solitude 2005, pastel, 24 x 36. Private collection
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  • Finding the right balance of materials can be challenging in mixed-media artwork. by Dawn Whitelaw Red Circle of Life 2006, oil, acrylic, and hammered copper on wood panel, 36 x 84. Orange Dragonfly 2006, oil, acrylic, and hammered copper on wood panel
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  • A look at the anatomical structure of the ear, and some helpful tips on how to draw people . by Ephraim Rubenstein Maddie 2005, pastel on sanded board, 19 x 15. In this portrait of my daughter, Madeleine, her ear is lit very dramatically from behind.
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  • The artists of the Ashcan School, known for their raw depictions of urban life, shared a background in newspaper and magazine illustration that shaped their drawing and painting styles. by Edith Zimmerman Far From the Fresh Air Farm by William Glackens
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  • This Maryland oil painter, renowned for her portraits, seeks the essence of her subjects and settles for nothing less. by Janice F. Booth Evening Pasture oil on linen, 24 x 30. Collection the artist. When we remember a friend’s face, we don’t
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  • A current exhibition in Stockton, California, shows how members of the Plein-Air Painters of America (PAPA) interpret their on-site studies to make larger studio paintings. We asked eight of the exhibiting painters to share their approaches with American
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  • Nearly 60 views of Malibu created by members of the California Art Club are featured in this exhibition, which explores not only the city’s picturesque scenery but also the enduring California plein air landscape tradition. by Michael Zakian Driving
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  • Colorado artist Dale Russell Smith spent years developing a range of techniques that allow him to balance free expression with tight control. Among those procedures is coating his watercolor paper with gum arabic. by M. Stephen Doherty North Rim, Black
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  • How theatre set design, an eye for detail, and the study of historical traditions and transitions can inform composition in painting and drawing. by Ray Rizzo For his class on the history of costume and decor, New York artist and educator Lowell Detweiler
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  • Be sure to locate the light source in the composition before you begin painting. by Elizabeth Pruitt Moonlit Forest 2006, acrylic, 24 x 30. This artist demonstrates some good, basic painting skills; however, the artist might want to consider the following
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  • This California artist pursues an aggressive, take-no-prisoners approach to plein air painting. by John A. Parks Dos Roses 2006, oil, 12 x 9. Courtesy Red Piano Art Gallery, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Ken Auster uses loads of thick paint and
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  • Oil painter Matthew Mitchell adapts Rembrandt’s working method for his portraits spotlighting Americans serving in civilian or military roles in Iraq and Afghanistan. by Karen Frankel Alexander Scott Arredondo 2005, oil on linen, 30 x 26. All artwork
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  • Veteran California oil painter Meredith Brooks Abbott explains how she has maintained a devotion to the routine of painting every day, with continually improving results. by Molly Siple Bird Refuge 2006, oil on linen, 11 x 11. All artwork this article
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  • Traditionally trained artist Sarah Lamb uses her passion for the kitchen to bring a new vitality to the art of the still life. Mousse au Chocolat 2005, oil on linen, 20 x 32. All artwork this article private collection unless otherwise indicated. by John
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  • It is critical for artists of all levels to understand and feel comfortable using linear perspective. by Stephanie Kaplan Understanding linear perspective is important for all artists, beginners included, regardless of their medium or subject matter,
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  • Artist Joel Iskowitz tells stories using the smallest of images when he creates coins and stamps. Here, he explains how he fits worlds of epic scope in the palm of his hand. by Naomi Ekperigin Deng Xiapeng, Chinese Paramount Leader 1997, colored pencil
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  • One of the top artists specializing in children’s portraits recently offered workshops for both oil and pastel painters. Although some of Wende Caporale’s specific instructions related to one medium or the other, her general discussions about
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  • Ria Hills, our Artist of the Month for November, is a pastel painter who celebrates the quiet loveliness of the ordinary. by Edith Zimmerman Egg pastel, 5 x 7. Collection the artist. Ria Hills , our Artist of the Month for November, is a pastel painter
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  • In the July/August issue of American Artist, we explored how portrait artist Leonid Gervits takes a stand for the legitimacy of the fine draftsmanship and multilayered technique 400 years after Velázquez. Here, we offer an excerpt from the feature
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  • Although Paul Lowe, our Artist of the Month, finds inspiration in nature, he almost always paints his landscapes from inside the studio. by Edith Zimmerman Palm Oasis 24 x 18. Courtesy Galerie Gabrie, Pasadena, California. Although Paul Lowe, our Artist
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  • Painting gouache on Arches black cover stock opens up a wide array of creative possibilities. by Stephanie Kaplan Self-portrait 2006, gouache, 20 x 15. All artwork this article collection the artist. Brenda Turner has a unique take on gouache technique
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  • Read the transcript from our online chat with artist-instructor Dan Thompson. If you have more thoughts to share, chat with your peers on Artists' Forum , and check back for more online chats with featured artists. 2007-06-13 12:00:02.0 Administrator
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  • by Bob Bahr Here are the basic art materials drawing. Drawing Graphite pencils A graphite pencil usually consists of a long, thin cylinder of graphite enclosed in a hexagonal wooden sleeve--the standard pencil. But solid graphite is also available in
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  • Watercolor Watercolor pigment is sold in cakes, tubes, and pencils. The binding agent for the pigment is usually gum arabic. Many artists prefer watercolor colors in tubes because they allow more-fluid application and increased control over color intensity
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  • View a demonstration of artist-instructor Dan Thompson's figure-painting techniques. Be sure to check back in the coming weeks for a more detailed video demonstration of Thompson's work. Step 1: Thompson set up the model in a sitting position
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  • The artistic journey of Bonnie Ramsbottom is one of both tragedy and triumph: she came to art late in life literally by accident when she began painting as a means to recover from the removal of a brain tumor, the surgery of which she was not expected
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  • This oil painter finds that his ongoing series of paintings depicting books allows him to venture into a number of themes—including self-portraiture. View an online exclusive gallery of Rubenstein's work. by William Chapman Sharpe The Great
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  • View a step-by-step demonstration of the sight-size method discussed in "Ryan S. Brown: Training Clarifies the Truth of One's Perceptions" in the winter 2006 issue of Workshop magazine. Step 1 An assortment of drawing supplies, including
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  • Screenprints can have subtle colors and edges, but the most stimulating examples are bold and crisp, as a selection from the Print Research Foundation, in Stamford, Connecticut, shows. by Bob Bahr The Hitchhiker by Robert Gwathmey, 1937–1943, screenprint
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  • Teaching students about color is essentially teaching them how to see—and then explaining how to paint beyond the literal. According to students, Montana painter Ned Mueller succeeds in doing this in his plein air workshops. by Bob Bahr Ned Mueller
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  • The Gallery at Lincoln Center will present the New York City debut of Ann Marshall and Matthew Wood June 7th through June 30. Ann Marshall & Matthew Wood June 7 through June 31 The Gallery at Lincoln Center New York, New York (212) 875-5017 The Gallery
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  • A knowledge of the three major perspective systems will allow you to create a convincing space in your drawing. Check out this primer on the subject. In scary films, a character somehow senses that something unidentifiable is very wrong as soon as he
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  • A career as an artist can be one of the most creative, personally fulfilling professions available, but sometimes making art is less about self-expression and more about paying the bills. For Donna Dewberry—an acrylic decorative painter from Clermont
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  • Californian Florence Strauss gradually builds layers of relatively dry watercolor paint on rough paper with a stiff bristle brush, starting with colors that define the background and moving to the objects in the foreground space. by M. Stephen Doherty
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  • Although it’s no substitute for painting from life, painting from photographs has its advantages, especially when you use the photos upside-down. by Jennifer King Indiana artist C.W. Mundy began a recent workshop in his study by discussing his methods
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  • Read the transcript from our online chat with top artist-instructor Dan Gheno. If you have more thoughts to share, chat with your peers on Artists' Forum , and check back for more online chats with featured artists. This chat was brought to you by
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  • We offer a color theory guide to assist novice painters. by Bob Bahr A painter can mix nearly every color with just three pigments. Exact hues vary from one manufacturer to the next, but an artist could go far with any company’s Indian yellow, naphthol
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  • In the June 2007 issue of American Artist, we explored how Ismael Checo uses rich color to create an exotic and intense experience of the world. Here, we present an online exclusive still-life demo as another example of his oil technique. Checo’s
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  • Take a closer look at Warren Chang's technique in this demonstration from the April 2007 issue of American Artist . The Thumbnail Sketch Using reference photos taken in the field, Chang did a 4"-x-6" pen-and-ink thumbnail sketch on paper
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  • Glass artist Richard M. Parrish reveals that glasswork and painting share common elements—color, composition, layering, and light. by Jennifer King Terre D’Ombre (Earth of Darkness) 2006, kiln-formed and cold-worked glass panel in steel stand
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  • This veteran painter conveys powerful meaning in his still lifes by continually shifting the backgrounds and settings in which they appear. by John A. Parks Icon 1994, oil, 18 x 12. All artwork this article private collection unless otherwise indicated
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  • This Hudson River Valley artist uses a limited palette to create landscapes drenched in an evocative and transporting light. by John A. Parks Hook Mountain, Nyack, New York 2006, oil on linen, 36 x 60. Private collection. All images this article courtesy
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  • Teachers of all grade levels and subjects can use museum resources to enhance their curriculum. by Erica Yonks African Mask 2006, 10th grade, charcoal and pencil. During a unit on the art and history of West Africa, students drew from figure sculptures
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  • This valuable lesson plan explains how to teach high-school students to draw landscapes. by Erica Yonks Green Trees 9th grade student, 2006, colored pencil. Grade Level: 9 Duration: three days Objectives • To depict landscapes with the illusion of
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  • Online resources offer students in all grade levels fast and easy access to images and background information that offer students a deeper understanding of fine art and art history. by Erica Yonks A Hyena’s Dinner 12th grade student, 2006, found
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  • In the June 2007 issue of American Artist, we discussed how the influences of a prismatic palette, a gifted teacher, and a solid foundation in drawing combined to infuse Susan Hope Fogel's oil paintings with convincing realism and sublime atmospherics
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  • An object is almost never in simply light and shade. Rather, it is usually in an environment in which light is bouncing around in several directions. For this reason it is important for beginners to understand the nature of shadows. by Bob Bahr Diagram
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  • The Blind Contour drawing exercise is a fundamental tool that can help artists of all levels learn to reacquaint themselves with the power of observation. by Allison Malafronte A student’s Blind Contour drawing of a hand from the Pacific University
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  • We offered words of advice about drawing basics from Brian Bomeisler in the winter 2007 issue of Drawing magazine. Here, we present his five global skills of realistic drawing. Bomeisler helped a student correct and adjust the proportions of his self
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  • California artist Alyona Nickelsen uses odorless mineral spirits to dissolve some of the pigment in her colored pencil drawings, eliminating the pencil strokes and creating rich, luminous color. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Sincerely Yours 2006, colored pencil
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  • Read the transcript from our online chat with colored pencil artist Alyona Nickelsen. This chat was brought to you by Legion Paper . 2007-03-08 11:00:27.0 Administrator: You have joined a chat with Alyona Nickelsen, a colored pencil artist featured in
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  • As a supplement to our feature in the winter 2007 issue of Drawing magazine, we offer a more in depth look at Brian Bomeisler's drawing workshop with an extended version of the article, additional images of student work, and more photographs of the
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  • Californian Kim Lordier has succeeded by pushing herself to create better and more original paintings with pastel and by stopping herself from rendering photographic details. “I had to gain enough confidence to make marks that expressed what I wanted
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  • Cast Study—Laocoon 2005, charcoal and white chalk, 26 x 19. Collection the artist. Students attending contemporary art schools modeled after 19th-century academies often spend their first months on the drawing basics and making sight-size copies
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  • In past issues, we explained how to analyze and correctly draw different areas of the body. In this tutorial overview of the figure, we bring it all together. by Dan Gheno Weighted Stasis by Dan Gheno, 2006, colored pencil and white charcoal on toned
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  • Despite the differences in their styles, materials, and techniques, the teachers we surveyed offered similar recommendations—up to a point. by M. Stephen Doherty Funchal by Frank Webb, 2005, watercolor, 22 x 30, Collection the artist. Over the past
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  • Helen Klebesadel offers tips on how to introduce the sometimes daunting medium of watercolor to novice painters. by Leanne MacLennan Cedar Dance II 2004, watercolor, 30 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist. Watercolor instructor Helen
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  • In the November 2006 issue of American Artist , still-life artist Benjamin Shamback explained how an energetic underpainting gave life to his carefully refined oil works on metallic surfaces. In this online exclusive gallery, we offer more still-life
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  • After a Trip to Italy, Fred Wessel learned more about egg tempera painting and adding gold leaf to his panels. He now teaches those procedures for emulating the dazzling beauty and inner glow of 14th- and 15th-century pictures. by M. Stephen Doherty The
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  • Florida Artist John Bowen increases his palette of colors and adds texture to his paintings by mixing zinc white gouache with his transparent watercolors. by M. Stephen Doherty Many watercolorists avoid using Chinese white or zinc white gouache with their
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  • Line has been around for a long time. Ever since the prehistoric era, when that first artist picked up a lump of wood ash from a spent campfire and outlined a hand on the cave wall, lines have described forms of all types--human, animal, and landscape
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  • If you know the anatomy of arms, you can use them to express much. by Ephraim Rubenstein Study of Arms 2006, red chalk, 26 x 19. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise indicated. This study shows the major masses of the arm in
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  • Nine years ago, Mark Norseth moved his family to Hawaii and discovered the perfect place to record the power, movement, and coloration of the sea in pastel paintings. by Tamara Moan It’s easy to spot Mark Norseth around the town of Kailua, perhaps
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  • Christopher Hart explains how he drew this gloomy ballplayer. Step 1 Although the basic head shape is big and round, it still has angles. The cool look of the character depends on a well-crafted outline. Step 2 A small, upturned nose is almost always
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  • As well as any artist before or since, John Singer Sargent learned the best lessons in value, light, and form and used them throughout his life—lessons clearly visible in his drawings. by Mark G. Mitchell Sleeping Child 1872–1873, graphite
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  • Achieving lifelike skin tones and a refined image is at the heart of Terry Sellers Buckner’s success as a portrait painter. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Tommy and Danni 2002, watercolor, 14 x 11. All artwork this article private collection. Terry Sellers
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  • We counted the number of times historical figures were referenced or reproduced in the first 10 issues of Drawing and showcased the the most mentioned here, with illuminating comments from two experts. by Bob Bahr It’s possible the greatest drawer
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  • Offering constructive criticism to students is one of the most important parts of the teaching process. Here we offer educators tips and exercises for facilitating successful critiques among students of different age levels. by Leanne MacLennan Constructive
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  • Time in Giverny with Monet transformed Theodore Robinson's work, and much of what he learned he later passed on to another promising young painter. by Stephen May A recent exhibition on Theodore Robinson (1852–1896) highlighted the importance
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  • In the March 2007 issue of American Artist , Utah artist Brad Teare used a number of techniques to give his woodcut prints a fluid, organic quality that brings them closer in appearance to his plein air oil paintings . Here, we offer more the prints he
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  • Forbes and American Artis t again invited a group of artists to spend a week together interpreting a vast Colorado ranch in their choice of medium, subject, and style. by M. Stephen Doherty View of Cat Mountain by Ephraim Rubenstein, 2006, oil, 9 x 17½
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  • This California-based artist uses a 19th-century palette to create a nostalgic atmosphere in his paintings. by John A. Parks Entrance 2003, oil, 40 x 30. Courtesy Morseburg Galleries, West Hollywood, California. Warren Chang paints scenes from two very
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored David Mayernik's drawings and frescoes. In contrast, we offer several of his watermedia pieces in this online exclusive gallery. Pza. di Torcello, Venice 2003, gouache, 7½ x 10½. All artwork
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  • by Edith Zimmerman From Hart’s Cartooning series (Watson-Guptill Publications, New York, New York). Anyone interested in the techniques of cartooning has probably heard of Christopher Hart . His instructional books have been read and reread by millions
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  • Our critic offers advice on painting rounded forms with soft edges to create realistic portraits. by Dawn Whitelaw A Spanish Song Acrylic on canvas panel. The artist has created a dramatic composition with a very appealing combination of interesting textures
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  • It’s important to consider color theory when painting a landscape. by John Budicin West Coast Fall acrylic on canvas. It’s important to consider color theory when painting a landscape because often, as in this painting, the colors are too
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  • Our critic discusses the importance of shadows and foregrounds when considering a painting’s composition. by John Budicin Sunset Edith The artist needs to consider how the shadows are placed in this painting. The interior shadows seem a bit dark
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  • In the winter 2006 issue of Workshop , John A. Parks tackled what is arguably the most difficult subject matter: how to organize color to paint the nature of light. We present an excerpt from the article with Park's advice about the basic principles
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  • While on location at the Forbes Trinchera Ranch, in Colorado, Ruth L. Beeve used watercolor and water-soluble oil to capture a variety of subjects. Back in her California studio, she uses those studies as the basis for more ambitious graphite drawings
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  • This Santa Barbara acrylic painter backs up her passionate views on land stewardship with an equally intense approach to painting the landscapes she loves. by Bob Bahr She is a calm, thoughtful person away from the canvas, but when she is painting, she
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  • Christopher Hart explains how he drew this typical trendy young woman with a simple technique that always produces a pleasing, sharp look for cartoon characters with a graphic flair. Step 1 The female, 20-something cartoon torso is built on two basic
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  • Depicting features is only the beginning. Putting life into a head drawing requires assimilating it with the rest of the body, capturing an attitude—and much more. by Dan Gheno Study for the Angel in Madonna of the Rocks by Leonardo, silverpoint
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  • We went in search of Anders Zorn in his homeland and discovered a personality large enough to encompass numerous contradictions—and a natural ability to paint in both oils and watercolor. by Bob Bahr When Anders Zorn's name is mentioned in the
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  • It's understood that a career in the visual arts can be personally fulfilling and professionally risky. That's why most people work secure 9-to-5 jobs and enjoy drawing and painting during evenings and weekends. But those limited hours just aren't
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  • In this excerpt from the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , David Mayernik discusses how copying the work of Old Masters trains his taste so he can draw and paint original work with the classical beauty he reveres. by Bob Bahr For David Mayernik , who has gone
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  • This helpful drawing exercise for drawing faces appeared in the fall 2006 issue of Drawing . If you have trouble seeing and drawing the nose close to the eye when you are drawing a head, be sure to try this exercise. by Dan Gheno Skull From Above by Dan
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  • With adequate preparation and the right materials, it's possible to create large acrylic landscapes en plein air. by Andrew Paquette In early 2003, I left the high-stress feature-animation industry in Hollywood, California, and moved to Arizona, where
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored the art of drawing realistic heads. Here, we present an excerpt from the article about drawing with light and shadows. by Dan Gheno Study of a Boy With His Hand to His Mouth by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored the sometimes daunting task of drawing accurate heads. Here, we suggest one technique from the article that will help you use perspective to better gauge the tilt of the head. by Dan Gheno Stereometric Man
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  • Debbie Cason Rankin explains how drips, puddles, and runs can capture a subject’s emotional state. by James A. Metcalfe Life Is Good 2004, watercolor, 14 x 20. All artwork this article collection the artist. “Hopefully this painting leaves
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  • Steve Rogers can point to the specific time in his career when his watercolors changed from being average to exceptional. That occurred when he met his future wife, found a subject he was passionate about painting, and had a religious experience. by M
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored John Singer Sargent's brilliant drawings. Here, we offer an excerpt from the article that discusses Sargent's use of light and dark values. by Mark G. Mitchell ”I think the chief characteristic
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  • Ohio artist Linda Wesner depicts American scenes that are quickly disappearing because she feels it is important that the viewer recognize the universal theme of change. by Bob Bahr Light Along the Hudson 2006, colored pencil, 25 x 12¾. All artwork
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  • In the January 2007 issue of American Artist , Ohio artist Linda Wesner depicted American scenes that were quickly disappearing because she felt it was important that the viewer recognized the universal theme of change. We offer 16 more of her colored
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explained how to draw dynamic heads. We present an excerpt from the article about measuring facial features. by Dan Gheno In my “Portrait Painting” article in the February 1993 issue of American Artist
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored how the best lessons in value, light, and form are clearly visible in John Singer Sargent's drawings. We present a excerpt from the article that discusses how he taught drawing classes. by Mark G. Mitchell
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  • In the “The Art of Travel” article in the January 2007 issue of American Artist , watercolorist Gayle Garner Roski explained how art enhanced her traveling experiences, allowing her to better appreciate her surroundings. Here, Roski further
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  • Maintaining a distinctive value structure is at the core of Joann Ballinger's pastel instruction--and her own paintings. by Lynne Moss Perricelli In both her teaching and her own pastel paintings, Joann Ballinger emphasizes the importance of a distinctive
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  • To achieve accuracy and harmony in his alla prima figure paintings, Californian Sean Cheetham stresses drawing and a system of mixing colors based from “mud” mixtures, as he calls them, that govern shadows, midtones, and highlights. He recently
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  • by M. Stephen Doherty Winter Ain't Far Away watercolor, 15 x 15. Can a pharmacist who describes himself as cheap actually convince artists to trust his advice about buying art supplies? He can if he is passionate about art, respectful of painters
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  • What will the 25th anniversary issue of Watercolor magazine look like? The answer could well be determined by the artists in this article who were recommended by teachers who are in contact with some of the most promising watercolorists. We asked those
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  • Editor-in-chief of Watercolor magazine, M. Stephen Doherty, recounts his memorable visit to the home of legendary watercolorist Andrew Wyeth. by M. Stephen Doherty In this account of my visit with Andrew Wyeth, I hope to convey the sense that he is like
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  • New York painter Travis Schlaht looks for—and finds—compelling beauty in many corners of life. Then, using a restrained but powerful palette, he mirrors it on canvas. by James A. Metcalfe Bar II 2005, oil on linen, 26 x 36. All artwork this
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  • We recently spotlighted Christopher Hart and his cartooning techniques. Here, we present more images from Hart's Drawing Faeries series (Watson-Guptill, New York, New York).
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored how Sigmund Abeles has shown several generations of artists the drawing basics : how to draw with organic lines, logical compositions, and lots of empathy. Here, we present an exerpt from the article about
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Workshop magazine, we examined how Sean Cheetham demonstrated that drawing and a system of mixing colors based from "mud" mixtures governed shadows, midtones, and highlights. Here, we present 10 of his figure paintings
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Workshop magazine, California artist Sean Cheetham explained how to achieve accuracy and harmony in his alla prima figure paintings. Here, the artist discusses common weaknesses in figure paintings in an excerpt from the article
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  • With sold-out solo shows, numerous awards, and prominent collectors to his credit, Malcolm T. Liepke is considered one of the finest figure painters working today. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Head Study Brunette 2002, oil, 12 x 8. All artwork this article
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  • In the November 2006 issue of American Artist , we explored how oil painter Sarah Lamb's passion for cooking brought a new sensibility to the art of still life. We present an excerpt from the article. by John A. Parks Peaches 2005, oil on linen, 17
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  • In the summer 2006 issue of Drawing , New York artist Lisa Dinhofer drew convincing objects in imaginary spaces, finding meaning in both the items and their presentation. In contrast, we offer nine of her playful oil paintings in this online exclusive
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  • Lee Boynton, a master of Impressionistic watercolor painting, explains how to learn more about color and value by simplifying your subject and painting it repeatedly under different light conditions. by Linda Gottlieb and M. Stephen Doherty Cozy Harbor
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  • Milt Kobayashi grants students permission to take complete control of their paintings and not feel obligated to paint exactly what they see. During a recent workshop, he encouraged participants to change a model’s pose, coloration, and costumes
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  • Chicago artist Tim Lowly communicates compassion and acceptance in his depictions of vulnerable humans. by Joseph C. Skrapits Portrait of K 2006, charcoal on toned museum board, 19 x 141/2. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise
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  • This New York artist draws convincing objects in imaginary spaces, finding meaning in both the items and their presentation. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Into the Light: Yellow 2004, colored pencil and collage, 19 x 22. Collection the artist. New York artist
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  • Tonal drawing--the juxtaposition of relative values, the notion of seeing masses rather than outlines--more closely replicates the way humans see than do lines. This emotional way of depicting the world has been explored since Leonardo; modern artists
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  • This New York state plein air artist creates impressive landscape paintings informed by his work as an illustrator and inspired by the work of the Hudson River School. by John A. Parks Creek Above Kaaterskill Falls 2004, oil, 20 x 16. All artwork this
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  • The United States Mint is inviting artists from throughout the United States to participate in its Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) to enrich and invigorate the design of coins and medals. The new invitations seek up to 10 Associate Designers – professional
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  • Artists often limit their potential by not taking full advantage of watercolor paints and supplies. Here’s advice that has proven helpful to my students. by Catherine Hillis There is so much conflicting information and advice available to watercolor
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  • North Carolina artist Kate Worm uses rollers to apply watercolor and gouache to create breathtakingly bold paintings. by Christopher Willard Brushes are overrated, at least according to Kate Worm. The North Carolina artist frequently uses no brush at
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  • "My goal," says Andy Evansen, "is to finish a painting in only three washes." Through simplification, bold brushstrokes, a bit of planning, and confidence, the Minnesota watercolorist capitalizes on the medium's ability to render
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  • “One of the biggest reasons painters get into trouble is because their pictures don’t have a solid foundation of accurate and expressive drawings,” says New York artist Jon DeMartin. That’s why his drawing workshops are so helpful
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