How to Draw Animals

Drawing animals is primarily a matter of patience. Animals are not always the most willing of subjects, so artists often have to take opportunities to draw these subjects as they arise. That means in any animal drawing session, you want to work quickly at first to capture the unique stance and bearing of the animal, and then focus on the details that distinguish them, such as the texture of an animal’s fur, feathers, or scales.


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  • Artists know something about plateaus. You work, you struggle, you soar, and then maybe you slow down and hit a wall, and the cycle repeats itself. There are plenty of ways to jumpstart your artistic practice so that the plateaus we all experience are
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  • The American Artist Weekend With the Masters events are always a whirlwind of activity—new people to meet, alluring art to gawk over, and then there are the workshops. Articulate, passionate artist-instructors share their own particular artistic
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  • Flower Garden by Clyde Aspevig, oil on canvas, 24 x 12. Content adapted from an article by Allison Malafronte. Clyde Aspevig is a landscape painter and seasoned plein air artist who prides himself on going out into his chosen environs with a feeling of
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  • A sunset sketch by painter Thomas Van Stein. This blog has been adapted from an article written by Allison Malafronte. Plein air painting is all about light and atmosphere. Painting during sunrise or in the heat and intense light of the day can result
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  • I remind myself that even artistic legends like Michelangelo struggled. When he did the Sistine ceiling in fresco, a medium he wasn't familiar with, the first few sessions were stressful and trying for the artist. But he persevered and created one
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  • I’m a color junkie. In fashion, in design, and especially in painting, vibrant color is what gets me creative. But before the image of Mimi from The Drew Carey Show becomes forever attached to my name in your mind, I’ll point out that I can control myself…sometimes. It’s tough
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  • Gesso is one of those words that seems to stop beginners in their tracks. It leaves many wondering how to use with acrylics or if you even need to use it in an acrylic painting . Historically, it is for oil painting and was traditionally used to prepare
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  • Jeffree , oil painting, 18 x 15. All works by David A. Leffel. I spend a lot of time brainstorming how an artist can become an Old Master of the 21st century. What kind of confidence, skill, and vision will it take for an artist working today to gain
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  • Unlike the plein air painter who wrestles with his or her subject, Old Master artists struggled with each other. It was a game in a way (but a serious one), to find ways to outdo each other in technique, or invention (concept), or complexity and scale
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  • Beginning at the Water's Edge by Jovan Karlo Villalba, oil on stainless steel, 24 x 24, 2010. I sometimes put so much emphasis on what I’m painting—thinking about what makes a strong composition and how to lead a viewer through a work—that
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  • After developing an unnatural dependency on my galoshes and stocking my kitchen shelves with an outrageous amount of sugary sweets in case of snowstorms, I’ve come to realize that it is nice to be on the inside, cozy and warm, looking out. My creature comforts appreciation has definitely also influenced
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  • There was a time in the not-so-distant past when my interest in art history stopped at Post-Impressionism. When I read art books and visited museums, I was instinctually drawn to artwork from the Italian Renaissance through Impressionism and curious to
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  • Slicker by Mary Whyte, watercolor painting, 18 1/2 x 18. I went through a phase when I thought I could control everything--where my career was headed, how my relationships were going to turn out, and what kind of life I was going to have. Ah, I crack
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  • Drawing can cause a repetitive strain injury (RSI), but with a few precautions and the right equipment, this risk can be minimized. by Edith Zimmerman Drawing is not usually thought of as a high-risk occupation. Calluses, dirty fingernails, stained clothes
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  • Cirque Tents by Terri Ford, pastel painting. "That dog won't hunt." It's what I thought to myself when I started to look into how to get layers of pastel to build up. It just didn't seem possible, or easily possible. But I did my
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  • Cheers to the quiet moments at home that artists can capture. Sketch by James Jean . As I am faced with being almost two months into this "new" year, I wanted to take the opportunity to belatedly craft a toast to 2014 and acknowledge all the
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  • I am writing this as things have never looked better for me financially, as an artist. I have had a few huge sales and wildly successful shows over the years, but I feel as if I have tapped into a new realm of possibilities in recent months. And this
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  • It's not as if the wall space in my apartment is getting any bigger, but still, I'm always looking at works of art and murmuring, "I know just the place for you..." And for the past several years I've been particularly drawn to works
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  • On a sunny winter day it's so hard sometimes to overcome the temptation to go outdoors with a sketchbook! Snow and sun make a special light and colors you never see in any other season. So why not to go out for a winter plein air painting session
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  • Head of 12-year-old Christ by Albrecht Dürer, drawing, 1506. Adapted from an article by Dan Gheno. As you know from my previous blog about needing a GPS to draw heads --because I get more lost in the eyes, ears, mouth, and nose than you'd think
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  • The drama of this charcoal and pencil drawing by Lilian Wescott Hale is in the bold contrast of value of the figure's skin, dress, and hair. I love all kinds of art: super complicated installations, amazing marble sculptures, and virtuosic canvases
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  • Can you really use bread as an eraser? Find out the answer in this brief blog post about the history of erasing--and check out a product from a Japanese manufacturer.
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  • Paintings of the sheer peaks of the Alps or serpentine glimmer of the Hudson River showcase the awe-inspiring characteristics of the natural world. But there’s something equally compelling about depictions of interior spaces. Think of how bleak and bereft Edward Hopper’s bedroom scenes are
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  • Painting with Knives Whenever I get feeling a little too precious or careful about my work, I have found it a real joy to leave the brushes at home and paint only with knives. The benefits of this approach open up with the first stroke of paint. Suddenly
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  • Story from New Smyrma Beach by Judy Pfaff, watercolor, oil stick, lace and doilies, 45 x 20, 2004. I'll admit that I have quite a few art idols. But I reserve my teen-girl Beatles shriek for a select handful, and Judy Pfaff is one of them. She's
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  • I was an impatient little girl. My favorite word was “now.” My favorite question was “Now?” And my favorite answer … you get the picture. But I’ve grown older and wiser (sort of!), and this maturity is mainly the result
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  • Joe Paquet (see our Voices of Experience interview for Members ) reminded us of this profound quote from poet Rainer Maria Rilke: "If your environment seems poor, blame yourself. Tell yourself you are not poet enough to call forth its richness."
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  • It’s tricky when an activity involves technique but is actually done best when you just get loose and let things happen naturally and effortlessly. Dancing is that way, and learning how to draw and sketch is that too. There are a lot of things to
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  • What makes an artist an artist? Certainly, we are unique individuals with our own creative impulses and drives, but we do have so much in common. So step away from the canvas, put the paintbrush down, and see how many of these "signs" apply
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  • Vermillion, crimson, scarlet, fuchsia—the color red comes in so many different shades. And of all the colors in the spectrum, it’s the most easily visible. It’s also the hottest of the warm colors and has even been proven to raise blood pressure and respiration rates. No matter the
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  • Darrell Brown paints simple, seemingly timeless "portraits" of fruits and vegetables. A few days ago a reader came to me with a good point: If an artist running a workshop can talk about the philosophy behind his or her oil painting art, all
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  • What was emulation? The classical formation of artists and architects in the Renaissance and Baroque took the apprentice on a trajectory from imitation to emulation to invention. If imitation was the foundation of an artist's training--copying a master's
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  • As much as the stereotype of the solitary painter working alone and shutting him- or herself off from the world makes artists seem mysterious and cool, I’ve found that artists tend to be fairly social creatures, and their cool factor isn’t lessened by their sense of community. Sometimes this
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  • Recently on Facebook, a friend asked how he may approach women about posing for him without sounding like a creep. I enjoyed reading the responses, which varied, in the spirit of Facebook, from "I long to have your curves on my canvas" to "Have
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  • L.S. Lowry's The Fever Van uses one- and two-point perspective. Knowing the basic methods of linear perspective drawing is key to creating the illusion of distance and space in your artwork. And thankfully, it’s all based on one simple idea—that
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  • Painting outdoors in winter can be an extreme sport. The snow, the wind, the cold—it takes a certain kind of artist to paint a winter landscape while in a winter landscape. The first time I attempted this was a couple of years ago when I was living in Connecticut. Two feet of snow had fallen the
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  • If you haven't had an opportunity to see the works of Anders Zorn in person, you might want to get a copy of the exhibition catalog for a show of his work at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The book, Anders Zorn: Sweden's Master Painter
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  • Over and over again I hear artists cooing about the thick richness of oil paints and its appealing spreadability, and yes, all of that is totally true. But artist Bev Jozwiak is giving oil a run for its money in terms of buttery appearance and saturated colors, and she’s doing it with watercolor
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  • At Studio Incamminati, student work is always pinned up on the walls for other students and visitors to see. It can be intimidating especially in the first months a student is studying here. It doesn't matter if you are taking a day class once a week
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  • No, not Spanish or Italian or French. An artist needs to be fluent in the languages of realism and abstraction. By realism I mean the formal aspects of art--the painting techniques and drawing skills we develop over time through experience. Abstraction is the other side of the coin, the visual language
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  • The Evening Show by Clyde Aspevig, oil painting, 40 x 36. You can often tell a painting that was painted en plein air from one that wasn’t. There is an immediacy to the light and atmosphere depicted in plein air paintings that isn’t always
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  • Heading into the long, dark nights of winter, we do not despair! Winter nights can provide opportunities for painting nocturnes, and we eagerly prepare our plein air painting palettes for the night work. There are good reasons to take advantage of winter
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  • During this time of year I like to reflect upon and appreciate all the blessings in my life (...also eat a lot of carbs and watch TV marathons). But lately I've been dwelling on how lucky we are to have so much amazing art created and inspired by
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  • It has been a while since I have blogged. Life has gotten in the way of drawing and painting, as we all know it can do. But now that I 'm back at it, I want to share what I am doing, and what I am seeing of others' work as well. One of the things
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  • Street Scene with Barbershop by Edward Hopper, n.d., charcoal on paper, 7-1/4 x 9-1/4 in. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce C. Loch. All works courtesy of Thurston Royce Gallery of Fine Art, LTD. I don’t think I’d be exaggerating by calling
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  • The Remains by Joe Gyurcsak, 2007, oil painting, 24 x 24. If I start my morning with a bit of artistic inspiration, it really carries me through the whole day, just like a wholesome breakfast does! And today is a very good day because I was able to begin
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  • Rembrandt launched my ventures in the homebrewing of ink. I live in a city that offers vast riches of art, but I personally came to draw and paint late in life. As someone who learns by doing, I wanted to reproduce Rembrandt's rich combination of
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  • When I was a kid, my mom always cut coupons on Sunday morning. I’d sit beside her and do the same, but I’d flip through magazines and newspapers and cut out pictures I liked or lettering that I thought was neat, and I never gave up my artsy coupon clipping habit because it’s a great
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  • A couple of months ago I posted some outdoor watercolor painting sketches of my Finland trip in the Artist Daily Member Gallery . One of the comments I received was from Harry R. Gray, in which he wrote: "...and giving watercolor its full respect
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  • Sharing studio space allows artists to come together for collaborations, or work side by side on personal projects. I’ve never shared a studio or work space, except for when I’ve been in the classroom. Which is weird because I’m social
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  • When it comes to choosing a subject to paint, one of the most convenient is the face you see in the mirror every day. But self-portraiture comes with a complicated set of questions—how do you see yourself versus how do you present yourself? What are you trying to communicate with the work? Who
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  • I've done a recent workshop in soapstone carving in Broken Hill. It was a two-day event, a Saturday and a Sunday with about eight hours of tuition each day. I was presented with a group of six students who have done various workshops before, however
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  • I’m starting this year by reassessing my approach to painting and recommitting to more concentrated studio time. I don’t necessarily feel that I want to completely revamp my process, but there are a few old habits that I want to break and a few new ones I want to instill. I’ve found
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  • There are several characteristics that go into the success of a great portrait painting. Whether it's good drawing, proper value relationships or a delicate balance of warm and cool temperature changes within the flesh tones, it's not uncommon
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  • Springs Caprice by Curt Walters, 36 x 36. Content adapted from an article by Allison Malafronte. Arizona artist Curt Walters is well known and recognized for his plein air impressionist paintings of one of the most inspiring natural wonders in America
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  • Drawing a face is a little like reading a map. And no, not the cool Indiana Jones map where the red line draws itself to the destination and ‘X’ marks the spot. I wish! It is more that when learning how to draw people , there are a few “signposts” on the face and rules of thumb
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  • Accurately forecasting what the weather will be like on any given day is often unpredictable, leaving us at the mercy of factors that are beyond our control. Because of this, meteorologists pay close attention to the ever changing weather patterns that
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  • Noelle with a Black Dress by Ron Hicks, 2007, oil, 20 x 16. Collection Gallery 1261, Denver, Colorado. I think photography has altered the way we judge the painted portrait. With the ability to capture a photographic likeness—from the details of
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  • Learning to do more than just see - to observe, study and remember one's subject is essential to learning to draw and paint. We have discussed the sight-size method of learning to reproduce what is directly before us. Once the student has mastered
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  • Untitled by Mark Tennant, 2009, charcoal, 24 x 18. Featured in Drawing , Winter 2010. As we head into the home stretch of the holiday season and finish up 2013, I did the math and realized it is just a couple of months shy of my anniversary at Artist
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  • Early Morning by Keith McCulloch, 12 x 16, oil painting. Artist Daily Member Spotlight: Keith B. McCulloch When I first saw Keith McCulloch's paintings, I took a deep breath. It was an involuntary reaction but a telling one—the airy, openness
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  • As we head into the end of the year and the heart of winter, it is nice to keep our inner artistic fires burning with visual inspiration and a wellspring of techniques to explore so that we make the most of a period of time that can otherwise just slip
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  • During this time of the year, as acts of generosity and appreciation abound, I’m drawn to the works of the painters and draftsmen of the Ashcan School, which thrived during the early 20th century. This group of artists—among them Robert Henri, Everett Shinn, John French Sloan, and William
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  • Oh my gosh, the last couple of weeks have flown by! But isn't that always the way it is this time of year? I hope you have savored the build-up to the holidays with time with friends and family, but I do hope you've been able to eke out time for
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  • It was a collection of drawings, of course. My good friend from grad school, Amanda, made me a handmade miniature book filled with calligraphy and fun sketches of our time together in school. The cover is light blue and the pages are accordion-style, one folding over the next. The book is made from basic
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  • During family get-togethers when my younger cousins were much smaller, they would always want to draw together or for me to draw pictures for them. Oh, man, they set the bar high! Princesses in gowns, cars and trucks, monsters—my little cousin Austin once asked for a galloping horse that took an
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  • The Twelve Days of Christmas is one of my favorite seasonal songs. When I was a kid, I always used to daydream about what I would do with all these crazy presents if they came to me. Drummers? Swans? Gold rings? Dancers? It all sounded so exciting! Today's
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  • No apologies from me for that attempt at sensationalism (I would have written tabloid headlines in another life). The truth is I was lucky enough to sit down and chat with artist and instructor C.W. Mundy, who is generous with both his time and his talents. We chatted about his upbringing, strategies
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  • It is well known that the rise of Impressionism was due in part to the new developments in paint chemistry which created brighter, more stable colors previously unavailable for oil painting . View of Arles with Irises by Vincent van Gogh, oil painting
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  • A lot of painters have strong opinions about whether or not it is helpful to premix colors on the palette before painting. I’m not talking about making your paints from scratch but rather about mixing a few colors, or even just one, after you’ve identified what the main colors in the work
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  • The Girl with the Wineglass by Johannes Vermeer, 1659. We are in a social time of the year. Holiday parties, galas, end-of-the-year revelries—there are celebrations galore. What’s great about such occasions for artists, in addition to seeing
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  • There is great interest today in reviving traditional methods and techniques of painting. Much of this interest comes about from the loss or absence of these methods in the teaching curricula of many art schools and university art programs. We have informally
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  • I used to think so romantically about Monet, Pissarro, and the other Impressionists. Not romantic like Manet is so dreamy; romantic as in idealizing this particular group of painters—thinking they stepped outside of their studios and, snap, Impressionism just happened. Veneration can sometimes
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  • With the Artists Network Holiday Sweepstakes in full swing, it really feels like this special time of year is for all of the painters, makers, drawers, and creators out there! Today's giveaway is from Lucid-Art. I can't think of a more worthwhile
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  • The Lantern Bearers by Maxfield Parrish, 1908, oil on canvas board, 40 x 32. I have a confession to make: I've never glazed an oil painting. The process intimidates me a bit—creating luminosity and an inner glow on canvas is no easy feat—and
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  • A palette from New Wave Art is today's prize. The holidays are always a special time, but we are here to make them extra special for artists with the Artists Network Annual Holiday Sweepstakes ! It's 17 days of prizes from the leading providers
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  • I love how artists can create worlds all their own—using the hills and valleys of a beautiful landscape or the sensuous curves of the human form. But that’s not all artists are capable of doing. Centuries ago, great artists like Michelangelo and Bernini didn’t just build worlds in their
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  • There is an enormous amount of information out there on the various methods for applying oil paint to canvas, but it seems to boil down to three schools of thought: thin painting, thick painting, or a combination of the two. The Thins, Thicks and Combiners
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  • Thomas Van Stein's student stepped back, with the help of her instructor, to evaluate her work. A dapted from an article by Allison Malafronte. Amidst all the sights, sounds, and smells that swirl around you when plein air painting , you have to remember
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  • How many times do we promise ourselves that we'll do something "one day", both in everyday life and our art, yet somehow never find the time? But if you make a list of these and pick one to do each month, and are willing to grab an opportunity
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  • The process of underpainting has such a buttoned-up reputation as an oil painting technique. If it were cast in a movie, it would be the uptight, by-the-book stickler that no one wants to hangout with. That’s because the process of underpainting
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  • You know how life can sometimes speed by and at other times crawl along at a snail’s pace? Well, drawing is that way too. There are drawing techniques that are incredibly labor intensive and deliberate, then there are others that are quick and unplanned.
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  • I knew we were in trouble when I opened the car door and brown water started flooded in. ‘Shut the door!' shouted Vanessa. "Mon Dieu, Mon Dieu!" muttered our French driver, holding her head in her hands. The car had stalled. The small
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  • Good painters don’t merely re-create what is in front of them. An experienced artist knows how to create a successful painting no matter what situation or model he or she is presented with. Of course, this often comes after years of practice and experimentation—as well as the development
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  • It is the season of appreciation and gift-giving, which is why I wanted to give all of you hard-working and dedicated artists out there a sneak peek of the prizes in store for you this year from the Annual Holiday Sweepstakes from Artists Network . The
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  • Artist Quang Ho seeks out a natural, effortless pose with his portrait painting models. Photos by Manuel Rodriguez . I'm a lounger by nature. Why stand when I can sit? Why sit when I can curl up on the nearest comfy couch? This has made my posture
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  • If I'd been born a century earlier, I think I would have loved menageries. They sound quite romantic, don't they? And it probably would have been the only time I ever stood face to face with exotic animals from distant places. A successful horse
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  • I'm sure many of you are aware of the Spanish living legend Antonio López García, but I'm ashamed to say I was not familiar with his artwork until recently. And as with any new discovery, once you become aware of a new person, place
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  • Fantasy art guru and top-notch artist James Gurney is a font of knowledge when it comes to so many aspects of drawing and painting . Whether you are into fantasy images or tend toward more realist compositions, Gurney has techniques and methods dealing
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  • As you progress with your studies of the human body and the ways of drawing anatomy , you will keep coming back to a very few of the basic principles. It is hard to think of them when one picks up the pencil and that is the reason for practicing drawing
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  • I don't think any of you know how often I brag about you and the great work you show off in the Artist Daily Member Gallery. Recently I had several colleagues looking over my shoulder at the computer screen as I showed them the pastel drawings of
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  • Hollywood Note: Thursday Night at the ***-and-Bull, It's the Maid's Night Out by Thomas Hart Benton, drawing 1937. A few years ago, I left Manhattan and went to Manhattan—Kansas, that is. I was a bit wary as I landed in the midst of a harsh
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  • I have found that toning my support, whether canvas or paper or board, is something I often do now. I’m showing two works to illustrate the difference between toning and not toning.
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  • Jacqueline Kamin paints with a sculptural sensibility that isn’t at all foreign to her practice. Earlier in her career she spent time as a bronze bust sculptor. “Working with sculpture is a lot of fun,” Kamin says. “It is very tactile and organic, but it takes a toll physically
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  • Somewhere out there, maybe even as you read this, a group of hungry, dedicated artists are taking a plein-air painting workshop. And at some point during this workshop—perhaps right at this very moment—one of those aspiring artists will ask the classic question voiced at least once in every
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  • Seated Muse by James Langley , a Foundation Studies professor at SCAD. The Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) believes certain artistic skills and techniques are fundamental for all students, whether these students happen to be filmmakers, architects, fashion designers, animators, or fine artists
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  • I typically don’t carry around a sketchbook, but during this time of year I could make an exception. There is so much going on, and it seems like everywhere I look there’s a composition waiting to be found. Just yesterday I went for a walk, and the sight of a little girl tugging demandingly
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  • Bob Bahr talks about his favorite pencil and asks readers for their opinions.
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  • There’s one thing and one thing alone that makes for a successful tonal drawing : seeing masses rather than outlines. Lines are for flow charts, architectural blueprints, and driving on the right side of the road. To a certain extent I am kidding—there are some incredible draftsmen who work
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  • This past Saturday was a beauty. The weather was warm enough to be outside comfortably, the light was sparkling, and it would have been a fine day to paint en plein air. Would have... if I had painted. But I didn’t. Instead, I went to a meeting and then spent the afternoon on the computer, completing
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  • Whiskey Creek (Spring) By Kate Ha rding, 2008, found leather garments, thread, grommets, and steel hooks, 54 x 35. One of the things I love about the artistic process is that we all share the need to put our creative energy into practice, we do it in so many different ways, and yet we usually have a
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  • The limbs of each figure is achieved with a quick stroke in this watercolor sketch by Wendy Artin. When I think of gesture drawings or quick studies, I see myself with a pencil in hand—that's always just made sense for those kinds of spirited
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  • My pencil drawing, Alley , was the result of a 40-minute pose that I did a few weeks ago. Let’s get right down to the business of drawing. I attend life drawing classes twice a week at Spring Street Studios, and for many years now, I’ve been
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  • The idea gives me chills. For me, painting is all about color schemes and giving the color wheel a workout. It is the kaleidoscopic chroma that draws me in, and I usually spend more time entranced by the colors I've mixed on my palette than actually
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  • Oak in the Snow by Caspar David Friedrich, 1825, oil, 44 x 34.5 cm, Wallraf-Richartz Museum, Cologne, Germany. I think all landscape artists and plein air painters have a touch of the romantic in them. It doesn’t really matter what type of landscape
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  • When an artist is primarily concerned with aesthetics his or her work can get boring for viewers pretty fast, especially in portraiture . Paintings of lovely women and blushing children can certainly be successfully executed and visually interesting,
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  • I'm always surprised that the so-called ‘Painter of Light' isn't a watercolorist. Luminous light effects are what the medium is all about, and watercolor artist Jean Grastorf has created a unique body of watercolor paintings showcase
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  • I'm thrilled to deliver this gift from ArtistsNetwork.tv to you: a free 4-day trial weekend to explore the newly redesigned site and take advantage of hundreds of art workshops online from the convenience of your own home and studio. Read more below
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  • The success of a portrait often relies on an artist's ability to quickly establish relationships, both on and off the canvas. It all starts when meeting your subject for the first time, whether it's a client, friend or model. During that time
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  • Shaker Barns by Charles Sheeler, 1945, tempera on board. When I think of the features that make up a truly American landscape, there’s one structure that always sticks out in my mind—a big, broadsided barn. They dot the countryside from coast
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  • Cincinnati artist Monica Achberger participating in a plein air paint-out, Milford, Ohio, sponsored by the Ohio Plein Air Society in August 2010. Looking ahead to the next several months, there are countless plein-air painting competitions coming up.
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  • J.M.W. Turner's works are awe-inspiring because the artist started with movement and power, light and volume, before ever even settling on his subject. I hit a wall trying to write today. I wanted to write about the importance of expressing strong
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  • Successful artists wear many hats. That's just the way it is. You are a one-person art business: a marketer, gallerist, art dealer, web master, agent, and, lest we forget, the creator of paintings or drawings that are worthwhile, powerful, and have
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  • This past summer provided several opportunities for me and my family to pack up the van and head out on the highway. But as the mileage on the odometer increased, so did my chances of making a wrong decision along the way. It helped to have a GPS to point
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  • When I’m landscape painting I’m always drawn to the curious, in-between places where the outdoors and indoors meet. This could be an ivy-smothered barn that almost looks like it is disappearing into the landscape, or an ocean view from an open window. The places where architecture and the
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  • A beautiful afternoon, some free time in the fresh air, a stunning location...I can’t wait for the weather to get just a touch warmer so I can get out and paint again. And as we look to the future, I’m thrilled to be joining all of you at Artist Daily as a regular blogger on the life of a
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  • Anting by George Boorujy, 2011, ink on paper, 55 1/2 x 108. That's always the statement that rings in my head when I focus on how to draw animals because in my mind, drawing animals is all about physical appearance and movement. A bear, an owl, and
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  • Pivotal moments in my life have often-to take a line from Ernest Hemingway-come "gradually, then suddenly." Nothing appears to be on the horizon, but then a few things fall into place, then a few more, and suddenly I'm in a whole new situation. It's often the same for artists who begin
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  • When it comes to painting portraits , it helps to think big. This train of thought not only applies to setting goals but also to applying paint. A direct approach of applying simplified, accurate shapes at the beginning of a painting can often lead to
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  • Drawing with ink takes the precision of a master draftsman and the skill of a watercolorist handling a fluid medium. When I was in school I was completely captivated by the silky dark lines of one of the most famous pen and ink artists, Aubrey Beardsley
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  • Fall is my favorite season. It's the season for starting over and discovering something new, harnessing your potential and looking around you with fresh eyes. As an artist it is the perfect time of year to cleanse your "palette" and take
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  • Because it’s hardly ever really blue. Think of Turner’s skies or even Monet’s—they are multifaceted and carry the hum of several colors. As many of us transition from painting outdoors to inside the studio, we can sometimes make assumptions and take certain things for granted
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  • Les reclus by Philippe Jacquet, 31 1/2 x 46 1/2. All images courtesy Axelle Fine Arts. Most painters I’ve spoken to say that it’s somewhat liberating to paint an imagined subject or a fictitious place. Working in such a way does come with
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  • How does one draw caricatures? Believe it or not that is one of the most commonly asked questions that I get about learning to draw. Everyone wants to know the secret and I tell them there is no one secret. In fact, there are THREE!!! The first is simple
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  • Alaska-born artist Steven Huston knows that when there's no mammoth sports arena or cheering crowds, an athlete on the field of play can easily turn into an artist's ideal model. Even without motion, an athletic figure still possesses an interesting pose, physical awareness, and conceptual power
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  • September is National Disaster Preparedness Month, which means taking time and making sure that we, our loved ones, and our homes and properties are ready if (goodness forbid!) disasters come our way and we have to make quick plans and decisions to keep
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  • I judge a successful cityscape painting by whether or not the architecture, the weather, and the figures—everything in the painting—combine to transport me somewhere different. If that happens and the barrier between my reality and the painted alternative gets a little blurry, letting me
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  • We are not unusual in our undying admiration for Sargent's painting style and abilities. What is less well known about him was his unflagging generosity and support of other artists, both financially, when needed, and in time spent teaching his painting
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  • For Renaissance Italians, great art was primarily about disegno , or drawing—but not just the process of drafting in itself. Disegno encompassed the intellectual aspect of an artwork in conjunction with technique. This shift in focus raised the status of the visual arts, which had been until that
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  • Our recent painting trip to Boston included a visit to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum to see some old friends painted by Sargent, Whistler, Zorn and others. (Members of The Artist's Road can see the complete article here: Plein Air Painting in
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  • Artists are the sharpest of observers, attuned to a person's passing gesture or the play of light and shadow on a building façade—but not everything that catches our eye is a painting waiting to happen. For Utah watercolorist Joseph Alleman , the stories that hold his interest are reflections
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  • "I'm going down to Cuba to see my friends Down where the rhythm never ends And no problem is too difficult to solve Yeah, times are tough down there it's true But you know they're going to make it through They make such continuous use
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  • A few of my artistic heroes get worse than no respect. They get anonymity. Jacques le Moyne de Morgues, Philip Gidley King, James Cook, Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres, John James Audubon—all were artistic adventurers, and most of them are virtually unknown.
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  • In the beginning, we all come to discover art in different ways. Perhaps a teacher in school handed you a small set of paints and said, "Try this," or a friend of the family was an art director and encouraged you to learn how to draw , or perhaps
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  • When I look at Artemisia Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes , I always focus on Judith’s clenched fist in the foreground; to me, it reinforces the physical violence of the scene. Viewing Auguste Rodin’s Burghers of Callais I gain a heightened awareness of my own body, as if I too
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  • An artist shuts the door on inspiration and creative possibilities when he or she withdraws from exploring subject matter because there doesn’t appear to be anything new to say. Painting flowers or fruit can seem to lead down predictable paths, but there’s always another avenue to explore
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  • They say when infants (or young children) fall down, they look up to their mother or father, to see how she or he reacts. More often than not, a parent will have an anxious and frightened facial expression--"Oh no, my baby is hurt!"--which,
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  • As an artist who has painted the natural world for over 20 years, Adam Straus has a complicated connection to his environment. In the 1990s, he painted Oil Slicks , a series of paintings that referenced the oil spills that happened at the time, and the relevancy of these paintings has been asserted again
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  • In order to understand what we face concerning how to properly draw the shoulder girdle, we will need to endure a bit of anatomy. Now it's not going to be a comprehensive coverage of the shoulder. We did all of that in the lecture on the shoulder
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  • With summer in full swing, I've been spending as much time as possible outdoors, going to concerts and plays, walking from place to place when I do my errands, and just finding every excuse for an outdoor excursion. Landscape painting is another perk of the season. There's something invigorating
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  • Woman in Repose by Sherrie McGraw, sanguine and white conte, 10 x 15 1/2. Interacting with so many artists and writing about their work makes me think a lot about the kind of art I would personally like to make. With all the high-caliber paintings, collages
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  • You’re out on location, enjoying a bit of plein air painting or sketching, then all of a sudden you realize you haven't the right color for an element in your composition. Nor will the colors you do have mix to produce it. You’ve two options
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  • I don’t have pets but I really love drawing animals because it allows me to focus on a subject matter that is totally different from what I’m used to. Animals’ bodies vary dramatically from bird to reptile to mammal, and that means I
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  • Landscape painting isn't about finding the perfect spot and turning it into a beautiful painting. It's about finding a spot and turning what you see into a beautiful composition by being selective. Two possible compositions for a landscape painting
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  • Robert Johnson strikes the perfect balance between master artist and down-to-earth mentor, supporting his students while pushing them to create the best works that they can. At a recent three-day workshop sponsored by The Art League School in Alexandria, Virginia, Johnson led students through the stages
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  • The best painters understand that they work to create an illusion. The sleight of hand that comes along with realist painting can be especially compelling when it hides in plain sight—when artists take on subjects that are almost diametrically opposed to the flat surface of their canvases and make
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  • Recently, I found myself experiencing a great deal of stress before an event where I was to paint live, before an audience. Painting in front of a crowd is not new for me, and the stress before the event isn't, either! Time and time again, I have
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  • Gaining exposure and recognition for one’s work starts with putting finished pieces in the public and critical eye. This can mean participating in local community shows or full-fledged exhibitions, entering competitions, and hanging pieces in galleries. It is an exciting prospect, but it can also
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  • When you hear the word 'Italy' what's the first thought that comes to your mind? Perhaps it's a gondola on the canals of Venice or the white marble statues of Rome (missing a limb or two). To many in the art world, Italy is the epicenter
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  • I've grown to appreciate floral paintings. Of course, flowers are nice to look at, and I recognize the technical skill needed to paint them, but I wasn't always certain of the appeal of the subject matter. The question of how an artist approaches a bouquet of roses or a pot of fuchsias in a unique
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  • Sunset over the Catskills by James Gurney, oil painting. If I want to excel in my craft and become any kind of decent realist painter, the two aspects of oil painting that I need to focus on are color and light. Perfecting the two, together, will allow
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  • Head drawing and the ideals of proportions have changed dramatically over the centuries. However, one thing has remained the same--a secret system of rules that few artists even know about, which are universally truthful and, when closely studied, can
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  • Kitchen Scene in the House of Mary and Martha by Diego Velázquez, c.1618. Ask yourself that question when you see an artwork you respond to and it might reveal what you strive for in your own artistic practice. In Diego Velázquez's Kitchen Scene in the House of Mary and Martha , the
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  • On a recent trip to plein air paint in Boston, we inspired ourselves by revisiting the Boston Public Library to study the grand mural sequence, The Triumph of Religion , by John Singer Sargent, located on the third floor of the McKim building. The gallery
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  • A still life changed my life?! It sounds corny, but it’s a little bit true! It was Francisco de Zurbarán’s Still Life with Lemons, Oranges and a Rose . He was a Spanish Baroque painter and I was a freshman searching for a major. Bliss and art history degrees followed.
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  • If the eyes are the windows to the soul, then a painter needs to get them right when creating a portrait. But the "oval, circle, dot" anatomy of the eye that we all first learned as children is far removed from how to give the illusion of a real eye in your work. Here are a few tips about painting
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  • Ann and I have been reading Marc Simpson's 2008 book, Like Breath on Glass: Whistler, Inness and the Art of Painting Softly , published on the occasion of the exhibition of the same name at the Clark Art Institute. It has provoked lively studio discussions
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  • No matter the venue, the accepted rule of thumb is that a painting should always be hung just above eye level. As a result, many artists create paintings with this point of view. Louisiana artist Mitchell Long seeks to subvert this expectation by manipulating vantage points in his paintings of landscapes
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  • The works of landscape painter George Inness (1825-1894) were both revered and dismissed in his lifetime. Although he was considered one of the leading and most influential artists of his time, his work eventually became controversial as he relentlessly
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  • Courtesy R&F Handmade Paints After spending all day sitting at my desk, click-click-clicking away on my computer, I savor getting out and being active, especially if I’m learning a new activity or skill. It’s the difference between reading
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  • Still Life with Apples by Paul Cezanne, 1879. That’s a bold statement—even from Paul Cézanne—but the artist was true to his word. He set out to reinvigorate painting and he did just that. The French artist became the conduit between
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  • It is the time of year when we find great joy and inspiration in our gardens. We love to watch our flower gardens slowly unfold through the spring and seemingly explode with the summer sun into a riot of colors, shapes and textures all demanding our attention
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  • In last Friday's post featuring artist-instructor Kerry Dunn, we explored some of the opportunities and challenges that an extensive color palette offers. On the flipside, Bulgarian-born painter Ignat Ignatov understands how an artist can benefit from the use of a limited palette. For a time Ignatov
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  • Sketching on location is definitely one of the most powerful sources of information, joy, and inspiration for an artist. At least for me. I love to paint cityscapes--the buildings, roads, cars, and people. To collect ideas for my paintings I just walk
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  • Kevin Macpherson is a renowned artist and instructor with 30 years of plein air painting experience. For newcomers, painting en plein air means literally, painting “in the open air,” and is the genre associated with painting outdoors. In 1996, Macpherson challenged himself to what I’d
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  • The Battle of San Romano by Paolo Uccello, c. 1435-55, tempera on wood. I'd have to answer with, "I'm not so sure." For me, studying Italian Renaissance and Baroque art meant spending a lot of time talking about how awesome linear perspective
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  • For many years now, Ann and I have had a running debate about the color green. Specifically, the greens I mix and use in my landscape paintings vs. the greens she mixes for hers. She thinks the greens in my color schemes tend toward the too-blue side
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  • “If the drawing is wrong, the fresco is wrong.” With that, master craftsman and fresco instructor Walter O’Neill began a fresco workshop that I attended a few weeks ago at the Morgan Library & Museum, in New York City. Fresco painting has become somewhat of a lost art over the centuries
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  • "Again and again I've taken quick glances and then for some reason I've got to sit before a picture waiting and it's opened up like one of those Japanese flowers that you put into water and something I thought wasn't worth more than
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  • Jeremiah by Michelangelo Buonarroti, Sistine Chapel, 1511. Rondanini Pieta by Michelangelo, 1564. I think the affinity that I have for art is definitely inborn. Art isn’t something I grew up with or was tutored in, so when I stumbled upon it on
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  • Glacier Over Lake Louise by Gil Dellinger, acrylic painting, 36 x 48. Almost all the painting I did in college was with acrylics, and most of the students I worked in class with did the same. Painting with acrylics was our best option because the paints
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  • The leg is not a straight line. A common misconception when drawing this limb is the idea that a leg that is not bent forms a straight line. This is far from the reality. One of the ways that will help with understanding the body and, therefore, the ability
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  • Clouds Moving , 1999-2009, oil on canvas, 31 1/4 x 37 1/2, by Bernard Chaet. Courtesy David Findlay Jr Fine Art. It’s the materiality—or, for many, that’s at least part of it. The buttery rich feel of oil paint moving across the surface
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  • We have been enjoying the book, The Artist's Eyes: Vision and the History of Art , by ophthalmologists Michael Marmor and James G. Ravine. One of our favorites among the many fascinating subjects they cover, is the eerie phenomenon or illusion in
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  • Collage materials can add visual interest and texture to a painting surface. Artwork by Misty Mawn. When I feel creatively blocked or bored, I revert back to childhood and start to play. Doodling, writing stream-of-conscious text, or painting loosely
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  • I won't lie when I tell you that looking at artist sketchbooks is one of the things I love to do most. And I've found that the pages that I linger over are usually filled with landscape drawing sketches. It is like I can look at the drawing and
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  • I wanted to share a blog about ArtistsNetwork.tv from our publisher and editorial director Jamie Markle. It's a great resource--and a great offer, so do read it over and, as always, enjoy!! Fellow Artist: If you have a passion for painting like I
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  • Looking at San Francisco-based artist Tiffany Bozic’s acrylic painting work is a bit like falling down Alice’s rabbit hole: the natural world looks familiar but plays by its own set of rules. Bozic’s flora and fauna—birds of prey
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  • There is a lot we have to juggle in our lives. As I think I've told you before, I have a list to keep track of my to-do lists because there are so many little details swirling around in my head. I know it is pretty much the same for you. But I also
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  • In Vladimir Nabokov’s novel Invitation to a Beheading , the pencil is described as the “enlightened descendant of the index finger.” That sounds about right, especially considering the pride of place that artists often afford their pens, brushes, and pencils. For many artists, however
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  • "Looking down on empty streets, all she can see are the dreams all made solid are the dreams all made real all of the buildings, all of those cars were once just a dream in somebody's head" --Peter Gabriel - Mercy Street Anyone can imagine
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  • Amy Mann converted the living room in her Virginia home into a studio with generous shelving for her still life props. I remember the first time an artist invited me into his studio. It was truly a reflection of his personality and experiences—full
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  • The centerpiece painting for my show "Venus Apocalypse" at Dacia Gallery this June is the eponymous painting shown here. This painting was the third in a set of Venuses. I shared about the first two, "Sleeping Venus" and "Venus
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  • The initial idea of this watercolor painting came to my mind when I was caught at the bus station waiting until a heavy rain was over. I took several photos on my cell phone while I was there. You can see how different are all these pictures are! The
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  • George Carlson and Boy with Eagle by David A. Leffel, 1991, oil, 42 x 34. I’ve always prided myself on learning good technique when faced with any new skill, and doing this has definitely made a difference. That goes for when I was learning to dance
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  • I’m from a card-playing family, so when it comes to discussions about artists using reference photographs, I always think in terms of watching for a “tell.” Like in poker—where players’ subtle mannerisms can reveal whether
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  • Tomie dePaola, beloved by children and their parents, talks with great good humor to another celebrated illustrator, Will Hillenbrand, in a freewheeling interview that spans dePaola's own childhood, his ties to theatre, and his time at Pratt. Tomie
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  • Figurative realism and allegory go hand in hand. Allegories—complex narratives built on layers of symbolism—are what allow works by Caravaggio, Titian, Bernini, Dürer, and Vermeer to carry resonance and remain intriguing centuries after they were created. Even though the power of storytelling
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  • Plein air painting enthusiasts often talk about how different the painting experience is when you are painting outdoors , under the sun. There's a thrill that comes from the challenge of capturing the scene--a spontaneity that records an artist's
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  • There is nothing that defines an artist quite like his or her palette. Some consist of premixed colors and others are developed in the moment, determined by the needs of each painting. Some artists are meticulously organized, with paints arranged by color temperature, while other artists arrange colors
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  • There are a number of misconceptions that I held about drawing and painting when I started taking art classes at Studio Incamminati, among them that really good artists don't have to make corrections to their work. Various instructors here have corrected
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  • Brooklyn-based artist Allison Maletz doesn't want to use watercolor in a traditional way. Although her work is representational and often figure-based, exploring themes of human connection and the quirky, often dysfunctional, "average American family," she refuses be bound by any rules
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  • I’ve always thought of a painter’s drawings as his or her diary. A finished painting is the confident, public face shown to the world, but drawings read like journal entries, where you can see an artist’s preoccupations, struggles, moments of exploration, and sense of play.
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  • What makes an object look three-dimensional in a painting or a drawing? We use a variety of cues to give us this information: light and shadow, contrast, pattern, color, texture, scale, temperature and value, usually in combinations. Our ability to measure
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  • I'm always surprised-and, okay, a little peeved-when my mention of an arts background is often met with a puzzled look followed by the somewhat skeptical question, "What do you do with that?" The truth is there's a lot to do with that, especially now-at a time when images are all around
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  • Hi All, We are doing a bit of reorganizing and revamping here at Artist Daily, and that includes making a few changes to our E-Newsletters. For those of you who get the Artist Daily E-Newsletter, nothing will be changing. You'll be getting the same
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  • Let's talk about common mistakes we all make because if you are making these mistakes and are told to look out for them, it will speed up your progress considerably. I am using examples of my student's drawings from the masterclass I teach to
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  • William Zorach is a well-known 20th-century sculptor who participated in the Armory Show of 1913 and whose work is held in numerous public collections. But as his career unfolded and he found his way as a sculptor, watercolors were always part of his practice.
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  • I love summer because I’m always on the go. It’s the best time of year to travel, and I just can’t seem to say no to any outing or adventure that comes my way. Want to take a road trip through the Carolinas, Court? I’m there. A holiday to Chicago? Sign me up. A vacation in California’s
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  • For the past year, I have been developing new work for my upcoming show at Dacia Gallery in NYC. Dacia is a small gallery on the Lower East Side, and the intimate size gave me the opportunity to put together a body of work with a narrowly focused theme
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  • Not too many years ago, San Francisco based artist Sadie J. Valeri was an aspiring figure painter stuck in a still life studio. She had a good deal of time on her hands to hone her painting and drawing skills, but her workspace was less than 100 square feet. The space constraints, plus the costs of hiring
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  • The sensitivity that is at the core of being an artist, whether a writer, designer, oil painter, or draftsman, is both a blessing and a curse. The paradox seems to be in how to maintain and nurture it while at the same time developing the necessary hardness
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  • When I went away to college I took a token from each of my loved ones. There was a Frankie Laine CD from my dad, a grungy Pearl Jam T-shirt from my brother, and a charcoal portrait of my mom that was made on the boardwalk of Virginia Beach when she was
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  • When I'm hiking or walking on the beach, my attention span is really short. I flit from activity to activity, sight to sight, just trying to take it all in. That's why pastel painting is a perfect fit for me when I want to create art outdoors
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  • Each day, people from all over the globe travel to Paris to visit the most famous oil painting in the world, the Mona Lisa . Many are just curious, and want to see the real thing for themselves. Some admire the famous enigmatic smile, the perfect proportions
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  • Storytelling often comes naturally to artists. Sometimes the story starts on a single canvas or sheet of paper and doesn’t end until there is a gallery full of paintings, a suite of drawings, a set of illustrations, a series of fantasy art comic strips, or an entire graphic novel. Certain subject
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  • We read an interesting article recently in The New York Times titled, " Why We Love Beautiful Things " in which the architect and author, Lance Hosey, wrote about some of the latest research findings and his opinions on the subject. Peony Bouquet
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  • Shaw's Cove by Ray Roberts, 2003, oil, 12 x 16. When I was in college, I read a lot of Romantic poetry, and what still sticks in my mind is all the water imagery those writers used. For them, water was a stand-in for life, transcendence, and the creative impulse. With such inherent possibilities
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  • Almost any artist will tell you that there's a certain appeal to working outdoors that can't be found anywhere else. With spring in full swing, many of us have left our studios for our porches, backyards, and beyond. To celebrate the season and all of the landscape art being made, here are 10
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  • There's really nothing quite like a deadline to get us in gear, am I right? I mean, when art is your passion but real life is your reality , sometimes it is hard to find ways to integrate studio time into our lives on a consistent basis. But that
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  • This cutie is wielding a paintbrush like a pro, right? When you look at the photo, what caption would you give it? Leave your caption in the comments section below and you could win an art resources bundle from Artist Daily. It's as simple as that
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  • I want to say a few things about massing. There are a few basic rules in figure drawing that will deliver results, but underlying them all is massing. If you cannot master massing, no matter how much you know of all the other elements of drawing, there
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  • I’ve spent way too much time in murky classrooms looking at slides, slides, and more slides. I’m convinced that the entire academic field of art history would grind to a halt without projectors, carousels, and slides. But what is weird about looking at so many images is that I find myself
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  • The moment the June issue of The Artist's Magazine hit the newsstands we started to receive a deluge of letters of protest and of praise. The cause of controversy was an article I’d written on the work of social realist Max Ginsburg, whose beautiful
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  • Painting the people and places one sees every day can be either a mind-numbing trial or an impetus for creativity that just happens to be homeward bound. For New Jersey-based artist Michael de Brito--who has spent the last several years painting family members and friends in familiar surroundings, such
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  • It feels right to talk about color and art during this time of the year, when flowers are blooming, trees are budding, and skies are (mostly) blue. After months of dull-colored scenery, everything seems to be flourishing wherever I look, which makes me
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  • A Collector's Decision to Commission a Reinterpretation of an Existing Work of Art Patricia Watwood has explored her decision to paint a second version of one of her most well received works, Pandora . She described her thinking about doing the second
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  • I just finished a very interesting commission. I've shared my oil painting, Pandora , on Artist Daily before. It was one of the central paintings from my 2012 exhibit at Forbes Gallery. I got a lot of positive feedback on that painting--and then got
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  • One of the best things about joining the Artist Daily team is seeing incredible artwork on a daily basis. This is especially true in the area of watercolor. I wasn't too familiar with many contemporary artists working in the medium before I started working here, but I've become quite the watermedia
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  • When my Norwegian Artist, Steve Henderson, gives an oil painting workshop, one of his favorite aspects -- as well as that of his students -- is when participants bring in their artwork for Steve to look at and make comments about. "I could spend
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  • One of the best conversations I’ve had about art wasn’t with an artist. It wasn’t with an art historian, curator, or gallery owner, either. It was with a mechanical engineer. We went from discussing his latest design project to the artfulness of historical blueprints to Leonardo’s
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  • When I walk through a museum or gallery, there are certain paintings that I breeze past and others that always draw me in. Self-portraits definitely fall into the latter category. I’m always intrigued by how artists choose to represent themselves and perpetuate their own personal mythologies. True
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  • As we all start getting ready to step outside our studios and paint outdoors or create studio landscape painting based on our experiences in nature, I wanted to explain the design elements that I put together for this particular painting, Summer Wind
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  • It’s only May, and already I’m fantasizing about summer road trips and exotic jaunts. But then I remember that almost every time I go on vacation my glow wears off once the artists show up. Inevitably, I see a traveler who is painting or sketching, creating significant and personal mementos
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  • Taking private lessons to learn how to paint is a wonderful thing, but if you feel you cannot afford them, an art consultation , in which you show another artist, a dealer, or an art appraiser your work and ask for their opinion -- which you agree to
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  • Human figure drawing, especially life drawing from a model, is one of the most rewarding ways of practicing art because it can enhance your abilities in ways that are both practical and inspirational. It's practical in that creating figure drawings develops skills that will serve you again and again
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  • Seeing a painting or drawing progress from beginning to end allows the finished artwork to be understood as a series of discrete steps leading to a virtuosic whole. During a recent tour of the Grand Central Academy (GCA), in New York City, I observed instructor Joshua LaRock developing a drawing of Michelangelo's
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  • The patterns of nature inspire our artwork. One of the most fascinating recent discoveries is the intimate relationship between the patterns found in nature's tiniest creations to the patterns found in her broadest, most sweeping productions. The
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  • The May Facebook Painting of the Month has been selected. Take a look , congratulate the winner, and enjoy this (hopefully) gorgeous first day of May!
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  • Sounds mysterious and threatening, right? No worries! It's just that when Liz Haywood-Sullivan began to create pastel drawings, she was dismayed with the range of dark colors available. "Rich, dark pastels were hard to find," she says. "Most
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  • Friends and family are wonderful, but when it comes to getting an honest, straightforward statement from them about what your fine art oil painting really, really looks like -- well, they're just so incredibly . . . nice. And nice doesn't help
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  • The very idea of me creating a "masterpiece" is hilarious. I mean, I'm still trying to figure out how to paint! But the fact is that by learning oil-painting techniques and absorbing all of the information and advice from oil-painting artists
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  • For just a few seconds, I thought that watercolor painting pencils were some kind of April Fool's come lately prank. I mean, everything I think of and know about watercolor painting is that it is fluid and kind of uncontrollable. In a pencil, how
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  • The large snow storms that graced our area this winter gave us opportunities to study the unique light, colors and shadows that only snow cover provides. Painting snow presents many challenges to the plein air painter--the least of which is the cold.
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  • Sustain Your Art Business With a Sound Studio Practice, Starting with Warm-Ups When I think of a warm-up, it is usually a sweaty business in which you raise your heart rate, get your muscles loosened up, and stretch a bit. Warm-up exercises for artists
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  • When Steve, the Norwegian Artist , was a young boy, his parents sought out a local artist in his town and arranged painting instruction lessons -- people do this all the time with the piano, and yet when it comes to art, it seems so . . . impossible.
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  • Can you imagine figuring out how to draw a face—the same face—350 times or more, and making each portrait drawing different and as compositionally sound and interesting as if you had made only one? Quite a task, yet Italian designer, sculptor
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  • The Oil Paintings of Margaret Bowland I was first introduced to the paintings of Margaret Bowland in 2009, when one of her portrait paintings won the People's Choice Award in the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition at the Smithsonian National Portrait
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  • We are not alone as artists in our passion for gardens. We follow in the footsteps of several rather impressive artists throughout history. Our personal gardens are designed for plein air painting and inspire us in every season. But this year, we have
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  • You know the drill! Below is a small cutout of a famous painting. Just name the artist and the painting ! Leave your answer in the comments section below and you'll be eligible to win giveaway from Artist Daily.The contest runs through Sunday, April
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  • You can go the less extreme route, of course, but there is something to be said about a studio painting session in which you don't pick up a brush. You don't make any sketches. You just observe. I find myself doing this again and again when I
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  • Discovering David Ligare's work was a great gift. Adept in every genre, he is master of composition, light, and color. With a classical sensibility and an ardent love of antique Greek and Roman culture, he is simply brilliant, and his work is beyond
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  • Last week we talked about parallel parking a car -- or in my case, not parallel parking the thing -- and how, if we don't know a specific skill, we can frequently compensate by doing things another way. It's not easy drawing the human figure accurately
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  • Drawing is a fundamental skill for artists, emphasis on "skill." That means there are basic drawing rules and approaches that work, including these six tips on how to draw anything accurately. Delmonico Building by Charles Sheeler, 1926, lithograph
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  • I'm a people pleaser. I innately want to make those around me happy and satisfied. So when an Artist Daily reader came to me wanting to know more about how to draw flowers, I wanted to come back to them with a resource that could really get to the
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  • What makes an object look three-dimensional? We use a variety of cues to give us this information: light and shadow, contrast, pattern, color, texture, scale, temperature and value, usually in combinations. Our ability to measure these different parameters
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  • I'm so excited that I got my words just a little mixed up! There aren't any artists on trial, per se, but you as artists get a free trial to Artist's Network TV! Starting April 11, take advantage of the FREE TRIAL Weekend at Artist's Network
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  • Especially since the mid-1800s, many artists have stressed color over other elements in painting. The Impressionists are notable examples. Monet, for instance, explored how to paint light and its effects on the colorful scenes he saw in his mind's
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  • Okay, I'm going to share with you my dirty little secret: I can't parallel park a car. Well, I can parallel park a car as long as I've got three blank spaces, in a pinch two, and it helps that I drive a Honda Fit. But for the most part I'm
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  • Let me first clarify that the watercolor painting technique of white-on-white isn't a highfalutin, conceptual idea of existentialism and the true meaning of art. No, it allows watercolor artists to achieve brilliant and bright shades of white and
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  • I have always loved myths and legends. It comes from appreciating a good story and all the things that go into the very best storytelling. The mixed media artwork of Julie Buffalohead shares stories of all types, blending personal narratives and metaphors
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  • So excited about the April issue of The Artist's Magazine ! We first saw the painting now on the cover of our April issue, Aine, Death Valley (oil painting, 20 x 30) when we were judging entries in The Artist's Magazine 's 2011 Annual Art
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  • I own up to the fact that I am drawn to the portraits artist Jenny Morgan creates because they are unconventional. Yet they capture qualities of the human face and our other human qualities in ways that read very true and lifelike. I like them because
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  • In December, I had the pleasure of going to a panel discussion with a few artist friends at The Teaching Studios of Art in Brooklyn. The Teaching Studios is a school run by my friend Rob Zeller--we went to school together at both the Water Street Atelier
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  • Arches, towers, bridges, and vaulted ceilings--I love all aspects of architecture and engineering, and it was through these things that I first started to appreciate plein air painting. Before, when I was trying to understand what plein air was all about
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  • In one of her recent blogs on Artist Daily, Marion Boddy-Evans observed that it is a good idea for portraiture artists who are trying to achieve a sense of naturalness in their work to pose for themselves. When I read this, I felt like I had been poleaxed
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  • We can never imagine a world without vision. Whether one works as a realist painter or abstract artist, the quality of our vision determines the ultimate appearance of the art that we make. As viewers of art, we can rarely know or consider if the art
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  • Continuing the long line of intimists from Vermeer to Vuillard, Mark Karnes makes an alluring world out of the quietest aspects of his domestic life. Like all great painters of the near-at-hand, Karnes' work reminds us that beauty is to be found everywhere
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  • Every year, we invite pastel artists to enter their work into our annual Pastel 100 competition, now in its 14th year. And every year, we receive thousands of pastel paintings. I am always stunned by the fantastic variety of the work and the extraordinary
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  • In a time when we often hear the arts being dismissed as unnecessary luxuries and when so many art classes in schools have been cut, it's nice to hear a little good news. Portrait of Claude Renoir Painting by Renoir, 1907, oil on canvas. A recent
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  • Looking at Mark Messersmith's artwork is like being sucked into a kaleidoscope. The colors are bold, varied, and everywhere. It seems odd to say this. I mean, of course, there is color everywhere--it's a painting. But what stands out about Messersmith's
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  • Certainly, there are pitfalls to making paintings from photos . One problem occurs when an artist thinks that a photo is magic and that he or she can turn a photo into a painting with a snap of the fingers. It isn't that easy, of course. And even
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  • The Clubfoot Boy by Jusepe de Ribera, oil on canvas, 1642. Art...has the power to make any spot on earth the living center of the universe; and unlike science, which often gives us the illusion of understanding things we really do not understand, it helps
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  • I am usually heartened when I hear disagreements about matters of art and technique. Maybe I'm just combative that way, but more likely, I think I take such debates as a sign that there are more artists coming to the table, that the field is growing
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  • The last two centuries, in particular, witnessed the final great explorations of the surface of the planet by scientists, geographers, and surveyors. In those pre-photography days, and for a while after, artists were an integral part of any expedition
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  • When I say "the perfect blend," I feel a little bit like I am describing a gourmet coffee flavor, but there really is a perfect blend that exists in pastel painting. For me, the crème de la crème of pastel drawings combines a certain
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  • Interest in acrylic painting is skyrocketing. There is less and less of a bias against this medium as a newcomer, and more and more of an interest in the healthful qualities and vibrant colors acrylics have to offer. In our free eBook, Acrylic Painting
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  • "A line is a path that can offer an interesting and varied journey, rhythmic and with occasional, pleasurable surprises. Thus is one tempted to take the journey again. " -Krome Barratt, Logic and Design: In Art, Science, and Mathematics Creating
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  • I went to an artist's talk the other day and was a bit taken aback when the artist admitted that she went door to door looking for a gallery, taking images to every venue she knew of and talking her way past many annoyed assistants to get a few minutes
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  • Is color important in a work of art? Most would say a loud yes! However, look at the wonderful work of the great, late artist, Andrew Wyeth. His Dad, the famous illustrator N.C. Wyeth, was often telling Andrew that he needed to put more color in his paintings
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  • Do you ever lose yourself in creating pencil sketches and discover, when you "wake up," that you've drawn objects or people or places that have personal meaning to you or ideas you've been subconsciously toying with? Drawing sketches
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  • This issue features a special section on colored pencil —we consider the advantages of the medium and look at the work of several contemporary artists doing wonderful things with their materials. We also look at ways that artists can use drawings to prepare for work in other media.
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  • I don't know if I've ever said these words "out loud" to you, but they deserve to be said, repeatedly and loudly. So here I am, virtually hollering at you across cyberspace: Experiment with abstract art! I know we have talked about how
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  • In the last article, I discussed my distressing and difficult sock project ( The Socks from Hell ), and how I didn't enjoy the process at all, and the best thing about the whole thing was when it was over and the socks were on my feet (which almost
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  • Artist Allison Maletz forcibly breaks with convention and defies the observed rules of watercolor painting, working in ways that seem contrary to what the medium is capable of doing and exploring subject matter that can spark uncomfortable and often contradictory
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  • Sometimes I get list fever, and this is one of those days. I have made a grocery list, a list of gifts I need to buy, and a list of artists I want to look up. The only list I haven't made yet is my list of lists! But lists are great things, especially
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  • "Of the original phenomena, light is the most enthralling." - Leonardo da Vinci Crepuscular rays are those wonderful beams of light we see at the beginning or end of the day that appear to radiate from the single point of the sun and stream
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  • I was always taught that effective color mixing starts with discovering the tinting strength of each color on your palette. For me, that is the basis of understanding how to mix colors, because it tells me how they will react when combined. A Breath Away
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  • If I had a time machine and could travel back to learn how to oil paint from any artist in history, I would not spare a second thought setting the clock to circa 1895, smack dab in the middle of the era when Odilon Redon was refining his fine art oil
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  • Those of you who have read me for awhile know that I'm big on this patience thing, even though patience is the least of my virtues. Come to think of it, I'm not sure if it's on my list at all, but I keep working at it, and perseverance is
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  • Here's a sneak peek at a great upcoming watercolor blog by artist and instructor Robert Reynolds on the importance of color and how personal choosing pigments can be. And after you are done, be sure to check out the new book, Watercolor Unleashed
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  • Here's a simple but oh-so fun challenge that could win you an Artist Daily apron. Below is a small cutout of a famous painting. Just name the artist and the painting ! Leave your answer in the comments section below and you'll be eligible to win
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  • Nature provides a constant source of creative inspiration to all of us. But to capture its spiritual essence, one must first discover one's own emotional connection to the subject. It's that special "something" that grows out of each
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  • Recently, we received a good question from a reader about how to paint one of our favorite landscape subjects--fog and mist. To understand how to paint light effects, it can be helpful to have a basic understanding of why things work the way they do.
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  • Whenever I go to the doctor and get my finger pricked, I'm always surprised at how much it hurts--at how sensitive the tips of our fingers are. Yet at the same time, they are so utilitarian. Judith Ann Braun's work uses both these qualities of
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  • I don't think the failure or success of a drawing has to do with the drawing ideas that the artist starts with. He or she could choose pretty much anything and make a go of it, don't you think? It also doesn't depend on whether the artist
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  • In a recent article I wrote, a reader commented about the "pathetic efforts" she/he, and other artists, make sometimes in the process of creating art. I understand what the reader is saying, at the same time that I vehemently oppose the concept
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  • I have a painter-friend who is gearing up to do a major work with figures, but she feels a bit rusty about painting a model in all his or her glory. To help prepare herself, she's set up a series of life-drawing sessions so that she can spend a bit
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  • Here are 7 basic considerations to take into account when designing your composition for a drawing or painting, all having to do somewhat with the importance of shapes. 1. Be aware of static shapes; for example, the completely dark, opened doorway or
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  • "The sight of anything extremely beautiful, in nature or in art, brings back the memory of what one loves, with the speed of lightning." - Stendhal A peculiar syndrome related to the viewing of art has been documented as far back as 1817 and
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  • Working with artists is a lot of fun. Really, I would put nothing before it in terms of what I want to do with my life's work. But sometimes it can be a little like herding kittens, and it can get really frustrating if the artists aren't organized
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  • Sometimes I can forget how good it feels just practicing drawing techniques. Simple things, like working on proportion and scale and line weight can feel so rewarding if you give yourself the time to really savor them when learning to draw. Mostly this
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  • When is blue not blue? Ask any Indigo Bunting and they will tell you, "When it is black!" This is because the feathers of the diminutive Indigo Bunting are not actually blue, they are black, and only appear blue to us when they are in direct
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  • In all the painting or drawing dabbling I've done, there is always a definitive moment that divides my experiences into "before" and "after." It's the moment I realize I don't have to worry about going back because every
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  • I had no idea that flipping eggs was such a seriously difficult thing to do. Our third daughter, Tired of Being Youngest, is in culinary school, and this quarter's project involves creating egg dishes of all sorts, with a major emphasis on being able
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  • It's not typical that an oil painting can stir up lots of contradictory emotions, but when I look at certain works it seems like the artist is able to capture not just one or two feelings but the whole emotional spectrum. When you see one of these
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  • I may have grabbed your attention at the risk of making you think I'm a big fat fibber, but I do think that when it comes to landscape painting, you sometimes have to lie--or at least exaggerate--to get what you want. This is based on personal experience
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  • Today we have just revealed the Artist Daily Painting of the Month on our Facebook page . Check it out, wish the winner well, and 'like' the page to keep up with us on Facebook . Enjoy!
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  • The more I think about and experiment with drawing techniques, the more I understand the extraordinary range of opportunity that drawing offers the artist, whether the drawing is intended as a preliminary sketch to a painting or a drawing in its own right
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  • In a lot of ways the art world can be a little like a trend-crazed teenybopper. What's new and exciting gets the most attention, while art and artistic movements and groups that have been around for decades or centuries fall out of favor. But I think
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  • "You know, it's not a sin to make mistakes, fail to succeed on the first (or 45th) try, or generally show that we're imperfect. The unspoken strictures that some businesses, churches, schools, other establishments place upon their members
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  • I'll admit that in the past I have been guilty of thinking of colored pencil art as colorful and bright and not necessarily able to be coupled with serious subjects or moody narratives. But that was my own bias. As I've spent time looking at sketchbooks
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  • Susan Lyon's figure drawings truly set her apart artistically and are the foundation and preparation for all she creates as an oil painter. If you ask her why, it is a drawing's immediacy, directness, and drama that are the ideal conduits for
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  • It is interesting to investigate how we make creative decisions, and how so many of those decisions are based on our perceptions of, or fantasies about, how others will feel toward our work. Perhaps this is quite normal for social beings used to negotiating
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  • When it comes to being able to draw with a paintbrush, no one can touch Rembrandt. He was able to turn abstract brushstrokes into forms with texture, weight, and liveliness. He could turn two swipes of a painting brush loaded with white paint into the
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  • Have you ever noticed when you are plein air painting how the colors of objects look so radically different in the very low light just before dawn or twilight? Take a red rose, for instance. We know that the flower's petals are bright red against
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  • I love stumbling upon facts about artists that make me rediscover them and consider their process in a whole new light. That's the kind of moment I had when I discovered that Roy Lichtenstein, the king of Benday dots and comic-book narratives, loved
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  • Going "no holds barred" sounds tough, and slightly scary, but I'm feeling particularly intense about not wasting time learning how to paint like I want to paint. The clock is ticking, but that really doesn't mean much. The clock is going
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  • With so much interest in plein air painting these days, it's easy to overlook how important drawing skills can be to the landscape painting artist. Fundamentally, drawing is both a way of seeing and a way of knowing a subject. If you can draw it,
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  • I don't usually think favorably of extreme ideas or extreme ways of doing things. Mostly, this is because I've found that sensible ideas often come with compromise. And in many ways, I think this applies to my ideas about fantasy art. I love fantasy
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  • Why go to the trouble of painting from life when our cameras can take such great pictures? Digital cameras have gotten so good at taking properly exposed, beautiful photos that they can fool us into thinking that they are also accurate. To be sure, the
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  • I recently had an Emeril Lagasse moment--and it happened when I mixed pastels with water for the first time. Three Sunflowers on Blue by Jimmy Wright, pastel painting, 30 x 41. A while back, I confided that I wanted to start an earnest study and exploration
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  • It’s quite sad that 18 th -century painter Luis Melendez died poor and relatively unknown and yet he is now recognized as one, if not the, greatest still life art painter of his day. His style and approach as a still life artist breathed new life
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  • Hi all, I wanted to take the opportunity to tell you more about the new "You Be the Judge" Art Contest 2013, which is an online art contest dedicated to helping educate, inspire, and equip artists by giving them the opportunity to showcase their
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  • We're pleased to announce that the Grand Prize winner in the "What Do You Love?" watercolor art contest is Johne Richardson, of Overland Park, Kansas. Congratulations, Johne! The winning image will be featured alongside the artist's
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  • Recently I have been sketching on the train and in the train station. It took me quite a while to get up the courage to do it, and so far it is going well, though the process is different than when I am drawing in class. When I sketch in the train station
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  • I was in Florida a few weeks ago and felt so lucky to be in such a warm, sunny place that I don't think I spent a minute indoors. I was kayaking, mountain biking, walking on the beach, and swimming in the ocean. And again and again I would look around
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  • The style of artwork I make often falls under the general heading of realism, and this oil painting is a case-in-point of why I struggle with the term. First, here's a bit of background on the source of my angst. In the atelier system, students are
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  • When I paint figures the work seems to matter more--I find that I'm more focused on the process than when I am just drawing fancifully from my head or creating a still life. And by "matter" I mean that the intensity is ratcheted up just
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  • I'm not qualified to tell anyone what they should or should not do, but if I was to give us--and by "us" I mean those artistically inclined individuals who love painting, drawing, and mixed media art --a universal homework assignment, it
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  • We have selected our Facebook Painting of the Month , which can be viewed on the Artist Daily Facebook page . Stop by and see who the winner is and wish him or her congrats, or maybe even pat yourself on the back for a job well done. Congrats to the winner
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  • I love my Honda Fit. And while that may seem to have nothing to do with art, actually, it does. You see, I drive my Honda Fit everywhere and in the process of its being used it gets dusty, the tires see wear, the interior windows next to where my Toddler
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  • Our goal is to make every issue of Drawing magazine as informative and inspiring as possible. In order to achieve this, we need you to share your thoughts about the publication. Before February 28, please take our reader survey, where you can tell us
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  • I look at paintings a lot. It's what I do--my work and my personal interests overlap. So yes, me and painting? We're on very familiar terms. And sometimes that can breed a bit of contempt as the saying goes. Sometimes I can be disillusioned and
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  • In figure drawing and painting, knowing the ins and outs of the human body is essential. There's no way around that fact, and honing our skills with anatomy drawing helps us understand and truly see the body more accurately than any other endeavor
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  • "When someone tells you to 'get out of your comfort zone,' wait for it. It's highly likely that they're subtly or not-so-subtly nudging you into doing something that they know you don't want to do, but they need done." -
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  • We are thrilled to announce that the Grand Prize winner in Drawing magazine's Shades of Gray competition is Joseph Crone, of Indianapolis. Congratulations, Joseph! The winning image will be featured alongside the artist's other work in a feature
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  • It's a brand new year and I want to start it off with a bang! And the one thing that I can't get enough of is color. The color wheel holds such simple beauty and complex mysteries, from saturated primary colors to more involved color mixes, that
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  • One of the most daunting challenges artists face is instilling a sense of movement and action into a drawing or painting. Just as artists must conjure a three-dimensional image on a two-dimensional picture plane, they must also create the sense of time passing in a medium that ultimately does not move
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  • As an artist, it's good to know how to critique yourself and your painting techniques -- and that's the key element: HOW to critique yourself. Stride into that studio of yours and take control of analyzing and critiquing your own work. Cadence
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  • I'm an artistic omnivore to be sure, but there is really nothing I love more and respond to more than pencil drawings. I know, the humble pencil and paper seems so simple, so basic. But what some forego and forget as too elementary, I see as essential
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  • I was doubly lucky last week because I had a thoughtful discussion with a great artist, Patricia Watwood, about how most notable representational art is "real" and about what happens to artists when they are faced with stepping outside that
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  • Often when I'm busy with teaching and working and tending to my family and professional commitments, when every second of my time is taken up and I just can't spare a moment to draw as so many of us are during the holidays, then an opportunity
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  • It goes without saying that making art is not a creative process that only goes one way. No matter what cleaned-up biographies or histories I've read about great American painters or Old Masters, I know that there is no neat and straightforward path
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  • The Norwegian Artist and I walk 3-5 miles every day, broken up in two or three sessions. It gets the dog out, me off the chair in front of the computer, and the Norwegian from behind his oil painting easel. During the break, we propound to one another
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  • For a drawing to be successful, you've got to start off choosing the right drawing surface. No matter how great the drawing ideas you have or the drawing art skills you bring to bear in the process, if you aren't pairing surface and implement
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  • That sounds gross, but in the hands of contemporary painter Alex Kanevsky, it's not. As a classically trained artist, Kanevsky's painting techniques and skills are strong. But the way he chooses to paint--in patches and broad swaths that lend
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  • As a special 'Happy Holiday' treat, here's a simple but oh-so rewarding game that could win you an Artist Daily apron. Below is a small cutout of a famous painting. Just name the artist and the painting ! Leave your answer in the comments
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  • While it was a lousy summer for tomatoes, something in the air made the pumpkins and winter squash particularly prolific, and we find ourselves with a workshop full of the stuff. What we are convinced is a flood of trouble may actually be a sea of opportunity
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  • The Painting of the Month has been chosen and is on view on the Artist Daily Facebook page . Come check it out to see if it is your work of art, and to congratulate the winner! And if you haven't joined us on Facebook , take a second to like our page
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  • Like his father, our Son and Heir likes to bicycle around the countryside, and during the autumn he never returns without panniers full of wild apples, picked from abandoned fruit trees . An abundance of apples or a challenge to face in your art--both
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  • John Parks, the author of so many of my favorite articles in our magazines and one who has had a long association with all of our publications, is also a practicing artist--go figure! One of the works in John Parks' current solo show. John's work
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  • Another slice of my personal humble pie is the fact that I'm pretty bad at math in general and downright horrible at geometry in particular. You'd never ever find me trying to use these skills when making art--or so I thought. But when I was gleaning
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  • Never mind that "the frenzies" is not technically a real medical condition. What I mean is that during the holidays, I feel like we can all get a bit frenzied. There are parties to attend and host, events to go to, cards to send, gifts to wrap
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  • Foreshortening! For me, it is truly the stuff of nightlights and pulling the covers over my head. I've struggled really hard to learn how to draw foreshortened objects and figures, because my mind constantly overrules my eye, saying, "That can't
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  • Our youngest daughter, Tired of Being Youngest, recently started culinary school, which means that we're eating a lot better these days. It's not so much that she's doing a lot of experimenting on us -- most nights she's home late and
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  • When you think about it, you probably have a personal symbolism—objects or colors or landscape features that hold special meaning for you. These ideas can develop from our personal experiences, our culture, or books we've read. In the comic
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  • Ever wondered where Da Vinci found the time to create all his masterpieces? Alongside his fine art painting he managed to dabble as a scientist, geologist, architect, mathematician, engineer, and anatomist with a bit of aeronautical design thrown in for
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  • The winning drawings have been selected in the Shades of Gray competition and this weekend winners were notified via e-mail. We would like to extend a great thanks to everyone who entered their drawings--we received hundreds of strong entries, and it
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  • I suggested in my previous blog that the difference between an excellent draftsperson versed in anatomy, perspective, elements of drawing and all the other disciplines needed to produce a realistic, believable figure drawing and an artist is that the
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  • I respect Steve Wilda's approach to still life painting because he depicts objects that most people would pass by. Torn lace tablecloths, broken mugs, rusted out pots—the items that Wilda depicts aren't refined, yet the still life paintings
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  • Around this time of year we are inundated with wintry scenes and beautiful snowy landscapes--on greeting cards, products, advertisements, calendars and more. But these winter landscapes aren't necessarily all created equal, and the same goes for the
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  • You’re in a beautiful plein air painting location, you whip out your camera and take photograph after photograph – it's essential to have lots of references for landscape painting, you know. Then you dig out your sketchbook, pencils, and
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  • ...You've got an artist in your life. Not to generalize, but as a whole I've found artists to be a fun, imaginative, and open group of people. That just must be the nature of the creative mind--you are always aware searching for different expressive
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  • A few weeks ago I attended a young artist's solo exhibition. Although he was technically skilled, the subject matter (mostly oil portraits with the models nude or semi-nude) didn't really inspire me. So why am I still thinking about his work-
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  • I have tried hard the past few years--with mixed success--to avoid answering the question, "How are you doing?" with the response "Really busy." Some blame our cultural "time shortage" on the clock, progress, and our obsession
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  • How does brush sizing work and where do you start? Have you every ordered some new brushes online, feeling pretty confident they'll be the perfect size for your latest oil on canvas creation? After all you spent all afternoon researching them. Only
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  • That was my first thought when I started to explore acrylic painting. The paints would dry so fast and it drove me crazy because I couldn't figure out what I was doing wrong. Looking back, I realize how many acrylic painting techniques I still had
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  • I've been told by more than one person that I try to see both sides of any issue. And my personal life aside, I can attest that I also do the same for art--I like to see it from all sides, materially speaking. That makes me a perfect match for mixed
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  • Uh, I think I may have stumbled into an artist's dream! The Artist's Network Annual Holiday Sweepstakes is going on right now, offering awesome art prizes from the best painting and drawing product makers and service providers around. Rosemary
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  • How to let go of small brush addiction so your paintings can move on to become more gestural If you lost all of your brushes, which one would you miss the most? For me, it's a 12 year old Filbert bristle brush that has lost its shape, has unruly hairs
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  • Artists who step outside their studios take a leap of faith. When you determine that you are ready to create a plein air painting , you take a chance with lighting, composition, color, and time. All of these are variables that you need to contend with
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  • Our best efforts are spent on timeless principles before specific techniques. -- Juliette Aristides, Lessons in Classical Drawing Juliette Aristides, artist and author. I'm Juliette Aristides, an artist, educator, and author based in Seattle, Washington
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  • It's the strangest thing. As I have said before, when I started taking art classes so many years ago, I really did not like still life painting . Now I love it, finding objects with which I connect and arranging them. There can be something almost
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  • Greetings all! I'm making my way out of a food-induced coma and spending quality time in front of my computer today. If you are on the same page, you will most definitely be interested in knowing about all the great deals that are happening today
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  • My dad is a little manic about asking our family to get our holiday wish lists to him waaaaaaay before he has to fight the crowds and wait in long lines. As usual, I'm procrastinating, but if I were to give him my art wish list, I could have it ready
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  • The Artist Daily Shop has what you're looking for, at Black Friday prices all weekend long! Enjoy an extra 15% savings this weekend when you use coupon code EXTRA15 at checkout*. Go on, treat yourself or a favorite artist in your life to a great deal
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  • Figuring out how to draw people is often a matter of breaking the body down into geometric shapes. When it comes to drawing people--specifically faces--you have to think of the sphere and the ovoid. Now, I'm not really a fan of looking at drawings
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  • How many of us have started a work of art full of enthusiasm and excitement, only to wind up disappointed with an unfinished oil painting or watercolor sketch and you are left with no idea why? While there are many reasons for these false starts, they
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  • I'm a water person. I love boating, swimming, scuba diving, and just looking at the ever-changing surface of nearby waterways. And I'm not alone. American artists--and those abroad--have been enamored with so many beautiful bodies of water over
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  • Zooming in and out of the Canadian North like a hummingbird on a flower, my mouse was beginning to heat up. An armchair explorer’s best friend, Google Earth was helping me understand the massive scale of the Arctic ( here's my video all about
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  • Okay, I'll admit that skull reading and phrenology sound a little silly to me. Trying to get a sense of a person from the hollows and grooves on their skull? Not buying it. But I do know that "reading" the skull as an artist is key when
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  • It is such a treat when you see an artist's work and you like it. Then you talk with the artist and you like him or her. And then you see them in action as an instructor and you fall for their teaching in a big way because everything they say makes
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  • No need to buy a holiday card from the card shop or grocery store when you are as capable with paint and pencil, collage and design, as all of us at Artist Daily. This year, help us ring in the holiday season by participating in our Move Over Hallmark
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  • I spend most of my time, as you well know, glued to my chair and on my computer on Artist Daily or searching artist websites and every art blog and art forum I can find. But that is when I am researching. But when it comes to developing my own artistic
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  • Shades of Gray Competition Results to Be Announced Next Month! It Kinda Draws the Eye In by Matt Tucker, 2011, graphite and white charcoal, 7½ x 14. Collection the artist. Finalist in Drawing's 2011 competition. Hello Artist Daily! This is
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  • We travel frequently to paint en plein air in new locations and sometimes teach workshops in those new environments as well. One of our favorite locations is northern New Mexico--the Abiquiu and Ghost Ranch area. Each day while we are there, we plan our
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  • Granted, this story gets a lot less steamy when I tell you that I'm torn between the work of two oil painting artists, Adolph Menzel and Jonas Lie. I've studied the work of both of these artists on my own for quite a while, trying to puzzle out
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  • Attention Watercolor Subscribers, F&W Media, publisher of The Artist's Magazine, Watercolor Artist, Pastel Journal, and Southwest Art, recently purchased Watercolor magazine. For every issue you have remaining in your Watercolor subscription, you'll now receive an issue of Watercolor Artist
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  • "If you could get inside the heads of the people around you, you'd probably be surprised at how unsure and unconfident they feel. It's likely that they'd feel the same about you. We're pretty good at hiding our true thoughts; it's
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  • A long time ago I read a quote from artist Nathan Goldstein and it has always stayed with me. He implied that artists are truly artists once they learn something and then forget it. I took that to mean I didn't have to study too hard in college since
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  • Attention American Artist Subscribers, F&W Media, publisher of The Artist's Magazine, Watercolor Artist, Pastel Journal , and Southwest Art , recently purchased American Artist magazine. For every issue you have remaining in your American Artist subscription, you'll now receive an issue of
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  • Click the picture above to view your free video lesson on charcoal drawing. I was inspired recently when I went to an art gallery show and saw some wonderful charcoal drawings. For so many of us, charcoal lessons were part of our first explorations of
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  • "Trees are poems that the earth writes upon the sky." - Khalil Gibran Perhaps the biggest challenge for those of us who paint from life is to see and understand what is right before our eyes. This may sound simple, but it is anything but, and
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  • I find that being an artist or art student is a bit like being a parent. The phrase: "Do what I say, not what I do" is too often applicable. For example, as I have expressed before, my goal is sketching something every day. The sketch drawings
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  • Some paintings are so powerful and easily identifiable that all you need to see is a little snippet to know it. Well, we put together a little contest for all of you based on that very idea. Below is a snippet of a famous painting (one of my favorites
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  • As much as I love the holidays I also stress a lot about gift-giving. I'm a people pleaser and want the friends and loved ones in my life to feel appreciated, which means I can sometimes get super anxious about how to show them how I feel. Myths:
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  • It's strange how sketching and drawing are such old and established practices—pen and ink drawing has been around since ancient Egyptian times!—and yet no two draftsmen are ever really the same, and each one's pursuit can lead to very
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  • When I use the words "fantasy pictures," I'm usually referring to all sorts of imaginative realism--not only sci-fi art or wanting to know how to draw a dragon. But bringing in a layer of fantasy to your paintings or drawings can be daunting
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  • I recently took a life drawing class and showed my sketches to a friend, who's a super-skilled painter. I was reluctant to share them, but when she looked at my final sketch--in which the model had her hips contrapposto but twisted slightly away from
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  • Perhaps the toughest skill that the artist painting outside must learn is the ability to judge values accurately, and then mix them in paint. The reason that this skill requires so much practice to get right is because our eyes and brains are constantly
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  • I hesitate to admit that some of my education these days is derived from Facebook, thanks to those seemingly endless placards with quotes that people are always posting: "I think it's weird how some days I feel skinny and some days I feel like
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  • Oftentimes we think that still life paintings tell quiet stories or personal, introspective narratives. I've certainly been guilty of it, but I'm not going to hide behind my pride. I've discovered that I couldn't have been more wrong!
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  • With the rapidly expanding emergence of social media over the last several years, I think the majority of artists--like most people--have looked upon the phenomenon with anything from mild curiosity to enthusiastic interest. Many of us have jumped on
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  • Did you just read that and think, "Wha-wha-what?" Well, when I first saw the phrase--which was originally applied to the sculptures of Antonio Canova--applied to the work of Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, I had the same reaction. But it is true-
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  • Hello there, I'll be doing some blogging for Artist Daily about human figure drawing . The plan is to do half of the blogging as written text and half as video episodes where it would be easier to demonstrate the concepts I would like to talk about
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  • What is success? Be honest with yourself. Do you truly believe that a successful person is defined by the car he drives, the title after her name, or their number of Twitter followers? Life is bigger, wider, deeper than what you can fit into a shoebox
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  • When I met a woman who told me about the best watercolor painting instructor she'd ever had, I had to know more. There are so many artists out there whose work is compelling but that doesn't always make them good teachers. I had to know what put
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  • Straight from the master's mouth, er, hand. Study Rembrandt's drawing techniques and you'll find short strokes and quick crosshatching that the artist used to get to the heart of every visual impression he wanted to depict. The Three Trees
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  • Those of us in the fine art industry know that artists and art galleries have had a long-standing love/hate relationship. Artists love the fact that galleries market and sell works of art, but they hate the fact that the better galleries keep 40% or 50
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  • We just sent the new issue of Drawing off to be printed, and I want to share a couple highlights that you can expect to see when the issue hits the newsstands next month. Stephen Cefalo, whose marvelous sketch "Justin" is featured on our cover
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  • I roll my eyes every time I hear about representational art and realism being "imperiled," because there are so many important representational artists painting right now. It's almost offensive how people think legitimacy comes with the
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  • Fine art has evolved in many directions, but comic book art has retained a strain of DNA from classical times. The heroic Greek gods were the forbearers of our modern superheroes and the portrayal of those heroes has carried on in the tradition of how
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  • "Frustration isn't always such a bad thing. It's a sign that you're trying something new, different, or outside your level of familiarity, and in working your way through it (and you will) you conquer this challenge and move on to the
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  • Here it is: If you aren't going to really push it when you make a landscape painting , it is going to be completely forgettable. Having looked at thousands of landscape paintings, and made a few myself, I'll be honest and tell you that only the
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  • Knowledge of anatomy is essential for artists who want their figures to appear realistic and natural. But we are not surgeons or medical professionals! Artists are not, and should not be, slaves to anatomical correctness. Académie d’homme
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  • They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But no one said that picture needed to be a photograph. As an art director, I've found that sometimes pen and ink drawings or pencil drawing illustration is simply the best way to tell a story, particularly
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  • We all enjoy using Facebook to stay connected to our friends and family, and Pinterest is a lot of fun for collecting and sharing ideas, but have you thought about how you can utilize these social media tools as part of your overall art business marketing
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  • I feel like every time I pick up a pencil to attempt portrait drawing, I am back in elementary school learning the basics of how to draw a face all over again. You know that art argument about whether you need natural talent to learn how to draw? Well
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  • Hi all! This month's winning artwork is now posted on Facebook. Every month a painting or drawing is chosen from the Member Gallery on Artist Daily, and posted on Facebook and included in the Artwork of the Month album. It's a great bunch of artworks
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  • The loss of an artist and teacher from childhood has caused me to reflect upon not only her life and work, but also those lessons that she taught me. The myriad distractions of daily life, from the constant need to earn money for survival to the many
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  • Note that I said learned—because I did not particularly care for or respond to Gauguin's oil painting Fatata Te Miti when I first saw it. I thought there was too much going on and the colors were too aggressive. It made me anxious and uneasy
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  • Art makes stories come alive. To me, it is as simple as that. And sometimes without art, there is no story-—or, at least, it's not quite as good. This was the case for the great American novel Moby-Dick . It is hard to imagine that Melville's
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  • A few posts ago I wrote about how introverts are normal people (gasp!) and introduced you to Susan Cain's warm and informative book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking . I wanted to revisit it to talk about Deliberate
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  • When I first saw the mixed media art of Lee Bontecou, my world went off-kilter. I had never seen anything like her darkly wondrous abstract art forms before. They are simultaneously lovely and threatening, calling to mind contradictory objects—artillery
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  • American Artist puts together a list of the greatest artists of all time, including the most influential teachers of today, the greatest female artists, and 25 artists of tomorrow.
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  • In this issue, we trace how representational art has alternated between hyper-realism and a more lyrical expression throughout history and look at some ways in which both past and contemporary practitioners utilize these techniques.
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  • I'm so excited to tell you about the opening night for the Contemporary American Realism exhibit at the Beijing World Art Museum . We were all blown away by the scale of the presentation, the press core, the ceremony, and the huge crowd. This has
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  • "The last mad throb of red just as it turns green; the ultimate shriek of orange calling all the blues of heaven for relief and support...each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow." --Charles
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  • In my first job right out of graduate school, I really wanted and needed a mentor. My friend Beth became that--and more--to me. She taught me the ropes, gave me support, and rooted for me. Beth got breast cancer when we were working together and I have
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  • Of course there are more than three painting techniques that will allow you to create a compelling artwork, but learning how to paint a picture well can certainly start with these elements. Rhythm. Painting objects that actually look alive, in the case
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  • Yes, you read that right! I've heard of extreme sports and extreme makeovers, but extreme outdoor painting ? This is a first for me. But when plein air artist Cory Trepanier told me that he had made a trek to paint the far reaches of the Canadian
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  • In some recent blogs, I have thought about drawing for the sake of drawing, and drawing for the sake of painting. Ja Fang Lu, an artist and instructor at Studio Incamminati, draws for these reasons too, but she also uses drawings that she is currently
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  • Swimming in the ocean of life, so to speak, it sometimes feels as though we must use every bit of energy to keep our heads above the waves. Over many years we have developed some techniques that help us to shed the heavy seaweed and barnacles of the daily
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  • Most artists tend to be dreamers, myself included. In 2006, with just my passion for painting the wilderness, I began to let my mind wander in and around the idea of painting places I'd only dreamed about--incredibly wild and remote landscapes. Places
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  • When it comes to certain creative sensibilities--awareness of color, editing a concept--I trust my judgment. I think I have pretty good instincts--maybe not in the execution of said sensibilities in an oil painting I paint myself, but I know good color
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  • It's probably half-endearing (hopefully?) and half-annoying that I think there's no better way to start off the weekend than with art. But you know what I mean! As the fall season gets into full swing, I think we are all coming back around to
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  • Do you remember my post on the insanity and sheer wrongness surrounding the fact that the Chinese people have never seen contemporary American paintings before? Well, we are doing something about it with the opening of the historic exhibit, "Contemporary
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  • I've been reading Susan Cain's Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking , and if you're an artist, and you're kind of quiet, and you think that you're a misanthropic hermit because you enjoy fine art painting
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  • As you know I love, love, love the New Yorker 's back page illustration challenge--where they give you an pen and ink drawing and you write in with a caption that you think goes with the image. Some are funny, some are curious, some are just plain
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  • Even writing the words "Top 10 Painters of All Time" makes me cringe a little bit because...really? Really? I find it a herculean task to narrow a list down to the best 100 oil painting artists of all time, let alone just ten. But in the spirit
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  • In plein air we attempt a form of direct translation. In the studio, we may recall our observations of nature, but are freer to be inventive with color. Night Passage by Mitchell Albala, 2006, oil painting on panel, 20 x 20. It's September and the
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  • Painting is an act of creativity and intention, but it sometimes, many times, includes acts of destruction large and small. It may be that the one skill that separates the dedicated professional artist from the amateur is the willingness to destroy, obliterate
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  • When it comes to putting additives into your paints, it just isn't the same as eating a Twinkie or bag of Doritos. Additives are necessary in some cases, especially for landscape artists who work with varying conditions when painting outdoors . They
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  • I've always thought of a painter's drawings or pencil sketches as his or her diary. A finished painting is the confident, public face shown to the world, but sketch drawings read like journal entries, where you can see an artist's preoccupations
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  • Sketching is information gathering and painting is translating the information. That's where I've ended up after pondering one particular comment made in response to my Wimping Out of Plein Air Painting post: "even if you are doing a plein
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  • Looking at the world through an artist's eyes is a bit like peering through a pair of rose colored glasses or the equivalent, where everything--colors, shapes, people, landscapes--can serve as inspiration for a painting or drawing . But that doesn't
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  • It is just reality that certain painting techniques and tools will get more of your attention than others as you develop your artistic interests and style. But knowing how to paint the way you want to paint should still leave room for new things, too
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  • "It's really hard for young artists. You're an adult at 18, but for a painter it takes longer. You really don't get it together until 35 or 45." La Blanchisseuse by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1884-1888, oil on canvas . Some research
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  • There's a lot of work to getting an artist website up and running , and once it's done, take some time to pat yourself on the back and indulge in a flavored coffee with lots of whipped cream. But after you're done, it's time to wash the
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  • Human figure painting, particularly painting skin, is the height of artistic prowess for me. I'll know I've made significant strides as a painter when I can recreate the opalescent glowing surface of skin. But I have a strong handicap to overcome
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  • I've always thought of art as a bit of a touchstone for really great memories in life. A few months ago I was reminded of this when I went for a visit to Scotland because, while I have snapshots galore to show for my trip, the one item that really
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  • Is it you?????????? Come on over to the Artist Daily Facebook page and check out the September Painting of the Month and congratulate the winner!
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  • It's no wonder artists are starving. People want their art for free. This morning I received yet another plea from a charitable agency, offering us the opportunity to support their ongoing mission by promoting Steve Henderson's oil paintings.
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  • I don't get to attend as many oil painting art workshops as I would like, so when the opportunity to participate in one does present itself, I really want to get the most out of my time there. Here are a few of my own "warm-up to workshop"
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  • Because the eye and the brain are constantly adjusting to the changing hues and values of sunlight and shadows when painting outdoors , it can be difficult to see those changes as they happen to our subject. If one is unaware that the original light has
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  • Following the submission process, exactly, when you send your portfolio to a gallery is crucial, be it emailing your website or sending off a package for consideration. The same attention to detail applies when you enter an art show or group oil painting
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  • There's something immediately nostalgic about Charles Kanwischer's graphite drawings. When I first saw them I immediately felt like I was looking at an old black and white snapshot. But in a way, his simple drawings are far better than snapshots
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  • Tricked ya! Sort of! On the one hand, fantasy art isn't that new at all. But as I was sitting in a meeting flipping through American Artist magazine's May 2012 issue --while still paying close attention to what was being said, of course!--I was
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  • I'm fascinated by the concept of "less is more," especially as it applies to representational painting. It's hardly intuitive that having less detail makes a painting more realistic, but that's often the case. We've all been
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  • This issue explores realism, both contemporary and historical. We also take a trip to the Woodmere Art Museum, in Philadelphia, currently hosting an exhibition filled with unconventional approaches to the realist tradition.
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  • Because learning about color complements on the color wheel is often one of the first lessons we are taught in art class, complementary color paintings--those contrasting blue and orange, yellow and violet, and red and green--are often thought of as for
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  • My kids accuse me of saying obvious things, along the lines of, "The car won't get you there if you don't put gas in it," or "Your clothes won't be ready to wear tomorrow if you keep them in the washing machine." But I
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  • For those who are painting with acrylics , this can be a big issue if only because you are constantly dealing with the consequences or benefits of your decision to work with jar color or paint from tubes. What I have gathered from my acrylic painting
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  • Plenty--especially if you are trying to figure out how to draw a person in that chair. Drawing people standing up is waaaaaay more straightforward than puzzling out how to proportion and position a figure sitting down. But to draw people this way opens
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  • A couple of weeks ago I spent a rainy Sunday cleaning out clutter—one of my least favorite things to do, but something I am always infinitely grateful for when it's complete. I cleaned out bookshelves, closets, storage bins, and shelves full
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  • I was in the studio of my oil painting artist friend the other day and she had a really sizeable bucket filled with oil paint tubes sitting beside her palette. Some of the tubes were so squeezed out and folded up that I wondered if there was anything
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  • Attempting to define realism or to clarify the various styles of representational painting can be a challenging task. When writing about today's painters, I always hesitate to use words like "classical," "realist," "contemporary
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  • Your website can be a terrific online portfolio . But there are definitely ways to not use your website when marketing art. An initial temptation for many artists is to find as many gallery e-mail addresses as they can and send out their website information
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  • I am rolling my eyes with embarrassment when I tell you that when I first saw watercolor paintings with wide expanses of color I assumed that these were applied and then wiped out and smoothed over after they were laid down. I had no idea that there were
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  • When I first saw the work of drawing artist Joan Wadleigh Curran I felt trapped...in a very good way. Curran takes as her subject matter from objects and places that most people would steer away from—dirty trash bags snagged on a chain link fence;
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  • I was reminded that art grows in the most unlikely places and conditions when I recently heard about the art scene that is showing distinct signs of life in Fayette County, Georgia. Wildlife watercolorist Dylan Scott Pierce teaches students about layering
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  • Not all art competitions are created equal. There are some that are themed art contests, and others are more open-ended about narrative. One art competition could have an open call for artists, and another could require its participants to submit work
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  • I'm not telling you anything you don't already know when I say that successful portraiture is successful when the portrait artist, foremost, captures a likeness. Yes, I ardently believe that there has to be something more to the story—a
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  • We enjoyed the recent plein air blog of artist Marion Boddy-Evans and agree with her sentiments. We have been outdoor painting for over forty years each (before the "plein air" phrase became ubiquitous) and have always felt that the value in
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  • First and foremost, a website is an online portfolio of you, your background, and your fine art painting or other artwork. Years ago, artists spent copious time and bundles of money making slides of their work and 8 x 10 prints that they tucked into a
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  • There's no shame in your game if you haven't heard of this kind of perspective drawing ...or lack thereof. I kind of pride myself on knowing a good bit about how to draw perspective (although my actual execution of a perspective drawing is usually
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  • Almost every artist I know who depicts people or creates portraits has spent time painting from photographs or drawing from them. It may not be how they develop a work foremost, but it is a useful method, especially when you want to capture a likeness
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  • I thought I'd share a sneak peek of the new issue of Drawing , on sale soon! The amazing cover drawing is by British artist Greg Eason . In my opinion, the drawing is even better inside the magazine--on the cover it's cropped, and there's
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  • The influential art critic Clement Greenberg (1909-1994) often cited the derisive term kitsch to critique artwork that, in his mind, failed to live up to the tenets of the modernist movement. His theories privileged formalist nonobjective abstraction
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  • Drawing includes many types of art, and to a great extent, what is considered to be drawing is a personal choice. In this issue, we look at artists working in nontraditional drawing styles and media, whose work can expand our perception of what drawing can be.
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  • I don't believe that gallery representation defines an artist or even makes one a professional, but if you are interested in pursuing that kind of relationship with a gallery there are a few tips to keep in mind. Make a solid connection. All the artists
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  • Get a website. If you're not a tech genius, you can still do this because there are numerous options. Some are free; some are not. Realistically speaking, the free ones severely limit what you can do and you'll find yourself outgrowing them in
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  • Hello August, and hello Facebook Painting of the Month ! Check to see who is on our radar this month and wish them congrats! Enjoy!
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  • I don't mean to be an alarmist, but there are certain habits that artists develop when oil painting that can be detrimental to the larger arc of their professional progress. None of us intend to pick up bad practices but routine and absentmindedness
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  • There are people who can sleep anywhere--in a car, on a couch, even standing up. I'm not one of those people. And it is the same for when I find the time to make art--I can't just plop down and do it anywhere. It doesn't feel right, and I
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  • Greetings everyone, Hello from Incamminati in the fine city of Philadelphia! A few days ago marked the fourth day of the Intensive Workshop being led by oil painter Lea Colie Wight , one of the senior Incamminati instructors, and a rising star in the
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  • It's that time again: the time for nations big and small to meet and lay claim to their dominance based on overinflated biceps--um, I mean, athletic prowess. I'm talking about the Olympics, of course. Whether you're an avid Games-watcher or
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  • I'm totally a sci-fi junkie and H.R. Giger is truly a master artist in the genre of fantastic realism. I first came across his work through his designs for Alien . Lately, with the release of Prometheus , his art came up on my radar again. Now, his
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  • It's not an unreal aspiration to make money by selling your oil painting artwork or watercolors, but it will take a significant amount of work in two areas: 1) Your art. While it is possible to make money off of art that isn't particularly good
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  • Every now and then an artist's body of work will resonate with me as being amazing, incredible, and just right not because the paintings or sculptures show technical skill or I'm moved by the subject matter, but because the artist seems to have
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  • Jeffrey Watts: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Jeffrey R. Watts is a southern California native. Growing up in rural San Diego county with an artist father, Watts demonstrated an early aptitude for the visual arts. After an injury cut short his
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  • Jennifer McChristian: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Jennifer McChristian was born and raised in Montreal, Canada. In 1986 she and her family took permanent residence in Los Angeles. In 1990 she earned a B.F.A with honors from Otis Parsons Art
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  • Michael Klein: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Karina's Rose by Michael Klein, oil painting. Michael Klein is a young artist in the NovoRealist movement (new realism), creating melancholic oil painting art that has a distinct and haunting
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  • Daniel E. Greene: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Daniel E. Greene is a former instructor of painting at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League of New York, both in Manhattan. He is the author of the book Pastel , which was
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  • Ken Backhaus: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Kenn Backhaus was born in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and spent much of his childhood on the family farm near Burnett, Wisconsin. His fondness for nature became the catalyst for his art. Backhaus' parents
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  • Ken Auster: Weekend with the Masters Instructor Clearing Skies by Ken Auster, oil painting. Ken Auster grew up with his feet deeply implanted in the sands of Southern California beaches. Caught up in the surfing culture of the 1960s, Auster ate, slept
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  • Juliette Aristides: Weekend with the Masters art instructor Alexis by Juliette Aristides, oil painting. Juliette Aristides is a Seattle-based painter who seeks to understand and convey the human spirit through art. Aristides is the founder of and an instructor
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  • I'm not a napping kind of person. When I'm up, I'm up and I want to be doing something or on the go. That's usually the kind of body drawing that I'm pulled to as well--muscles torqued, body indicating action, and an underlying sense
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  • Whenever I end up in a conversation where other artists start talking about the kit they take with them when plein air painting --and it often starts with what plein air easel is the best--I tend to keep quiet. Very quiet. A page from my sketchbook when
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  • There are subject matters that are fairly easy to take in and those that need more time to understand and a willingness on the part of the viewer to move out of his or her comfort zone. Works that artistically represent intense events--like violence or
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  • The influx of artistic institutions moving into the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City continues with the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery prepared to make the leap. After showcasing groundbreaking oil painting work and other art pieces for the past 23 years
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  • Given what we've discussed in the last two articles, Am I an Artist? and Am I a Real Artist ? Not to mention Part-Time Artists Are Artists, Too --you probably have a pretty good idea of what my answer to this one will be, but let's talk about
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  • If art was a place on the map, pencil sketching would be its somewhat lawless backcountry. Sketching is all about freedom from rules and learning how to sketch what's in front of you no matter how unexpected. That's why sketching seem like the
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  • Henri Rousseau is best known for his exotic jungle scenes, but did you know that he never left France during his lifetime? All the imagery he painted was invented entirely in his mind and perhaps coupled with inspiration he got from listening to others
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  • I love, love, love the New Yorker 's back page--where they give you an illustration and you write in with a caption that you think goes with the image. Some are funny, some are curious, some are just plain silly, but it just goes to show the power
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  • When an artist chooses to work representationally, he or she inevitably has to take a stance on the use of photographs and the artistic merits of photorealism. Whether perusing a workshop catalog or engaged in a debate with fellow colleagues, the question
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  • You can tell a lot about an artist's point of view by how they draw people . It sounds simple but in fact the diversity of vision and execution is pretty vast. There are contemporary artists out there practicing in a traditional vein dating back to
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  • Education plays a major role in our development as artists, and by extension has a significant impact on all visual culture. In this issue, we explore the history of art education and visit a range of schools and programs that can help guide your study and teaching plans.
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  • "Am I a Real Artist?" This question is slightly different from last week's question , in which nuclear physicists and non-nuclear physicists ask if they are artists--the addition of the word "real" adds new dimension, along the
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  • I don't care what anyone says, color is king. It makes everything better--more appealing and lively. Oftentimes in an artist's drawing practice, a sense of color takes a backseat to the black, white, and gray of charcoal or graphite. But that
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  • Because this issue of American Artist focuses on art education, I thought it would be interesting to explore the teacher-student relationship, particularly what happens after a student completes a course of study at an academy or an apprenticeship with
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  • The winners of our Self-Portrait Cover Competition are featured in the September issue of American Artist, and they share advice about how to paint the figure and how to maintain a successful painting practice. When we asked David Tanner, the winner of
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  • Painters and draftsmen alike puzzle through perspective drawing issues. They almost have to if they want to establish any kind of sense of space in their work. Without linear perspective, all that remains is the flatness of the surface-and no artists
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  • "Am I an Artist?" I can't help but wonder how many nuclear physicists get up out of bed each morning and ask themselves whether they are nuclear physicists. Granted, if one is a nuclear physicist, one has concrete evidence of the fact--education
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  • An artiste is something you don't want to be, that is, if you consider yourself an artist. While it sounds akin to archaic words like poetess or authoress, which in years passed denoted a female poet or author, an artiste is a "sort of"
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  • In this extra-length special issue, American Artist takes you through the business of being an artist, including advice for securing commissions and information on how you can use the internet to reach your professional goals. We also visit master workshops from artists such as Bo Bartlett and Donald
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  • Topics and ideas that tend to strike a chord and spark debate are often that way because they are so subjective. In art, color is definitely one of those sensitive subjects because no two people see a color in exactly the same way, nor do painters always
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  • Plein air artists are the first to tell you that you can go back to the same site over and over again during different times of day and it is like being in a whole other place. Light does that! It can turn a bright and sunny scene into a murky and mysterious
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  • We had a run of some pretty severe thunderstorms in the New York City area recently, and as a father of three, that's terrifying. Nothing can be worse than three kids under the age of five locked up in a house for a day, especially when the thermometer
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  • When I think of one iconic American oil painting , Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emmanuel Leutze always come to my mind. I love talking to people about the work because it is so polarizing--some love it but some people absolutely hate it. So here's
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  • Last week we talked about whether "real" artists take workshops (they can, and do). Now let's consider whether you have to make your living full-time as an artist in order to be considered one. Many of us hold down other jobs while we pursue
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  • Over the weekend, a friend of mine joked that an artist's ultimate goal should be something like 1) making work that is awesome, 2) being famous or having people appreciate your work so you can make a living doing it, and 3) doing what you want--meaning
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  • I've always wondered how an artist decides how to paint the background of an artwork. Did Sargent--who painted everything, even air, with volume and texture--employ certain painting techniques for this section of his works? Are there actual painting
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  • Focusing on traditional painting methods and their contemporary application including encaustic used in the Fayum region of ancient Egypt, egg tempera from early Renaissance Siena and oil painting from Renaissance Venice is a way to connect your studio
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  • I have always loved charcoal drawings. A few years ago, I came across a book of charcoal figure drawings by Henry Yan , who was then an instructor at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. I immediately bought two copies of the book--one to keep
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  • One of the shows that has left a lasting impression with me is "Édouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940", which was at The Jewish Museum. Visiting this exhibition introduced me to Vuillard's life and work and resonated
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  • I've always been fascinated by artists who live during incredibly polarizing times, but somehow still seem to go their own way. Elmer Bischoff--ever heard of this oil painting artist? He stands out as an artist in the aftermath of World War II when
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  • Sometimes the hardest thing to do is that thing we have to do. Resistance...I call it the "R" word. It gets me in trouble more often than not. And, crazy as it may seem, it is usually my own resistance I find myself fighting against. I want
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  • I chatted with a watercolor painting workshop student the other day who sighed, "I'm not a real artist. I probably never will be." "Why?" I asked. "First, because I'm still taking painting workshops and learning. Second
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  • Abstraction is a key part of how you paint or draw anything. It is seeing completely with the eye, and not allowing the brain to contextualize what we are seeing. But turning off the brain is no small task! I've found that painting with acrylics has
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  • The number one strategy for still life painting and drawing that professional artists have recommended to me or have explained to art students within my hearing (yes, I'm a major eavesdropper) is that you should not settle for the first object that
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  • Watercolor Painting Step-by-Step Demonstration Rousillon is a sleepy village in the Luberon region of Provence, well-known for its ochre mines that provided the pigments for the manufacture of paints, including the ones we artists use. On our last workshop
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  • The size, clarity, and portability of an iPad begs for it to be used as a digital oil painting canvas or sketchbook page, and now you can do just that. I'm consistently amazed at the apps for artists that are being released on smartphones and tablets
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  • We've all had those moments when the details and concerns of keeping all the plates spinning distracts us from the one thing, the most important thing, that those of us who are creative people must do--create. Even doing chores that are pleasurable
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  • Let's talk about this term, luxury, first. A luxury is something that you don't really need, and by that definition, lots of things fall into this category. We need shelter; we need protection from the elements; we need food; we need water; we
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  • Have you ever looked at an abstract art piece or oil painting genre scene or pastel seascape and wonder, how'd they do that?! Chances are the answer lies somewhere in mixed media. Art that tends to defy our eyes does so for a reason--it isn't
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  • Being outdoors revitalizes us in a number of ways. You can relax and laze away the day in the shade, climb the tallest peak in sight, or be awe-inspired by the waterways around you. Of late, I am definitely in the latter camp. A good friend of mine has
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  • The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Presents Work by Emerging Artist Jordan Griska for Lenfest Plaza In the newly constructed Lenfest Plaza located adjacent to Philadelphia's Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), artist Jordan Griska
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  • When I discovered grisaille oil painting I thought I'd gone to heaven. Learning how to oil paint is a lot of fun, but it is also just a lot . There is so much to deal with--getting your forms right, steering toward an interesting composition, brushwork
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  • California has long been seen as a land of opportunity. People have been flocking there since the Gold Rush of 1849, which brought close to 300,000 settlers to the state and incited an economic and cultural boom of epic proportions. For artists, the attraction
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  • Some artists make a big deal out of being self taught, but truth of the matter is, all artists are self taught. The difference between the two is encapsulated in two questions: Are you learning oil painting for example only from yourself, just from what
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  • When you can do something well, it can be difficult to set it aside or modify that skill for the good of your art. John Evans is an American artist who admits to battling the tendency to overwork his oil paintings, sliding between depiction and evocation
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  • What was that beautiful work I saw at the Met? Which room was Sargent's portrait painting , Madame X , in? I loved that Renoir but didn't have time to go back and spend a little more time with that work and that work alone. How do I answer these
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  • When plein air painting , one of the most enjoyable and facile medias I've found to work with has to be watercolors. Hands down. The supplies are minimal, you can paint quickly and move from place to place making sketches of what catches your interest
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  • In any painting, the biggest expenditure for the artist is the frame that goes around the finished piece. If it's a watercolor painting, there's the matting, the glazing, and the frame holding it all together; for the oil on canvas or acrylic
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  • The art of still life painting is a time-honored one that has been around since at least the time of the ancient Egyptians. Still life paintings were often used to adorn the interiors of Egyptian tombs with the belief that these depictions of food and
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  • In this issue, we reveal the finalists in our self-portrait cover competition and look at the atmospheric landscapes of David Dewey.
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  • I'm not blessed at this point in my life to have children, but if I did you can bet I'd be one of those mothers who want portrait paintings of her children at every stage of their lives. Even better, I could learn how to paint children like artist
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  • I love Masterpiece Theater on PBS. Recently the movie Birdsong aired--a love story about a soldier on the battlefield of World War I and the lover he left behind. Claude Renoir Writing by Pierre Auguste Renoir, lithograph, 1902/3. There was a scene from
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  • Mural From the Oaks Hotel by Jessie Arms Botke, 1953, oil on canvas with gold leaf, 82½ x 173½. Courtesy The Irvine Museum, Irvine, California. The Irvine Museum in California is shining a powerful spotlight on the artwork of talented female
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  • If you do not have an official, proper, "real" painting studio, don't feel bad. Your studio can be in a corner of your dining room. Many people's are. Or it can be a section of the garage where you make your oil painting art ; a spare
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  • It Kinda Draws the Eye In by Matt Tucker, 2011, graphite and white charcoal, 7½ x 14. The spring issue of Drawing is now available, and it's full of resources for artists, especially if you are into figure drawing or figure painting. Here's
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  • I now have my own range of watercolor painting brushes and while going through the process of choosing their design, fond memories came flooding back to me from my time living and studying art in China. There I was fortunate enough to meet a wonderful
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  • We are big admirers of J. M. W. Turner's work in oil and watercolor, especially his magnificent, ethereal watercolor paintings . Unfortunately many of his paintings are much less vivid today than they were when he painted them. We know this from written
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  • When I was in Art History 101, my professor touted the competition for the design of the Baptistry doors in Florence in 1401 as one of the greatest historic art competitions of all time. In one corner we have the young Lorenzo Ghiberti, only 21 at the
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  • I acknowledge that there is a lot about the color wheel and mixing colors that I don't know. But one thing I do know is that there's more to art than color schemes and memorizing a color mixing chart. Andrew by Fred Hatt, drawing with aquarelle
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  • I feel so inundated with ideas from every single photo reference around me right now. Sometimes I am super inspired by them, but sometimes they make me want to put my paintbrush down because I get so overwhelmed by all the ways I can start painting from
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  • Regardless of the kind of art you practice, if you have any hopes of making a living at it, you'll eventually have to share your creations, whether at an open mic, in a YouTube video, or putting together an oil painting group show with artist friends
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  • You don't have to think terribly hard to figure out that the painting genre that has all of these characteristics in common is floral painting . It is a practice that has inspired artists to create beautiful, graceful paintings for centuries, but
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  • I work with knitters, and a student recently told me, "I don't like the way my stuff turns out." When I asked her what kind of yarn she used, she replied, "Oh, I just picked up something cheap. I didn't want to spend money on something
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  • Recently we added an informative article to the members' area of The Artist's Road called "Understanding Light in the Landscape: The Carlson Theory of Angles." It gives the student a crucial tool to make sense of the confusing array
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  • Some artists, you love what they draw. But with every landscape drawing of Georges Seurat, it is the way that he draws that makes all the difference. Take any of his sketches and chances are it is fairly simple in composition. There are very few elements
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  • Recently the students at Studio Incamminati went to New York. I chose not to go, instead wandering around the school looking at the drawings and paintings on the student walls. Natalie Italiano , an instructor in the core program as well as a Fellow there
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  • As an artist, I often feel that I am more sensitive than others, or perhaps I am more in touch because I need to be so that my work will flow genuinely from my heart and allow me to respond from a deeper place. That is one of the reasons that I faced
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  • Earlier this week I was lucky enough to attend the opening of Jason Bard Yarmosky's solo show "Elder Kinder" at Lyons Wier Gallery, in New York City. It's a terrific painting exhibition, and it got me thinking about how an artist can
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  • Imagine life with no television, no computers, and where books are a rarity. The power of art would increase exponentially because you wouldn't be inundated with visual images all the time. The handful of artworks you might see in your entire life
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  • The Artist Daily Facebook Painting of the Month has been decided. Check in at the Facebook page to see who it is and help us celebrate with the winner. Enjoy!
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  • I can't think of a single parent who lolls in the passenger seat of the car, detached while observing their teenaged driver's inaugural foray into the city streets. Sometimes we rest, relax and dream--not, however, when we are actively painting
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  • Comics, of course! Back in college I got a little bit obsessed with the history of comics, mostly as an art appreciator, although I was also fascinated by how much social commentary was injected into the narratives and stories. But my interest in comics
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  • My mom is an artist, but she's nothing like me. For all that, we're both artists. If you want to know where I got my artist genes, I got most of them from her. Genes alone don't make an artist, though. Making art is kind of a stupid career
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  • Master instructor Dan Thompson teaches you how to combine numerous measurement and proportional strategies during gesture and figure drawing to create rewarding, unified results.
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  • In this issue of American Artist, we look at both the plein air and figurative work of the California art scene. Articles feature the upcoming “On Location in Malibu” exhibition, the philosophies and artwork of NovoRealism, Weekend With the Masters instructor Jennifer McChristian, and the
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  • In its most elementary form, a pen and ink drawing is stark black marks against a white surface. No dilution of color, no shades of gray. But artists who've spent time inking their way across a page know that drawing with ink can actually be an incredibly
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  • Can you think back and remember what it was like to really struggle with a concept? I've got no pride. I've done this a ton of times--riding my bike, algebra, Avogadro's number...and perspective drawing . I thought once I got to college and
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  • I've come to realize that that old saying "It's not always what you know, but who you know," is spot on. Even at American Artist magazine . Luckily, "we" know a lot of people, and as a result we have remarkable access to some
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  • The Norwegian Artist and I have a friend who specializes in painting small pet animals...that is, when he paints. While to paint regularly, you don't need a huge space, you'll find yourself happiest with a designated one. On the Horizon by Steve
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  • In their day, the Hudson River School landscape artists were so popular with the public that people would line up and pay a fair amount of money just to view a single painting. Our plein air blogger Jennifer King shares her insights on why the works of
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  • Short of lobotomy, we will always have the equivalent of mental trails that our brains follow when we are painting. Artists develop these based on painting techniques that they've learned along the way, or they can be expressions of inherent ideas
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  • Different people attend painting workshops with varying expectations, but the ones who get the most out of the experience are those who recognize that workshops are not: A workshop gives you the opportunity to start at one point in your artistic journey
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  • I started off seeing skin tones in a closed off way, not really pushing to find the dimension and depth right in front of me. I almost felt I was still pulling a Crayon out of the box to color a figure's form from head to toe like I did in childhood
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  • It's funny how I have gotten so immersed in art that I tend to project very human emotions or ideas to inanimate objects in paintings and drawings. Still life painting objects that don't spatial connect in some way most often won't connect
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  • In collaboration with the Hispanic Society of America, we take a trip to Spain, where we consider the legacy of that country’s greatest masters. We explore the working methods of Sorolla, the lasting influence of Goya, and the techniques Velázquez used to create portraits of such power.
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  • A few weeks ago I had a studio session with Lea Colie Wight , a great painter who had a really lovely tone to her oil painting surface that many of us loved and wanted to know more about. I wanted to share that info with you! Canvas Toning Process The
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  • Whiskers. Spinach. Drip. Beyoncé. How easy do you think it is to draw those words? How about when you have to draw them on a 2-by-3-inch screen with just your fingertips? Draw Something is the new hot app for iPhones and iPads--it's essentially
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  • Yep, it is a pretty lofty goal. I know it. But there are so many incredible artists out there who are doing incredible work and deserve more visibility! Here are a few ways that you can elevate your artistic profile in the wider world. By no means are
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  • One of the major challenges of painting outdoors is the need to gather enough visual information about our subject in a brief moment of perfect light. In rushing to capture the light in nature, it is easy to lose those subtle details and tonal changes
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  • Whether or not you like to be around a lot of people is one thought to consider when you choose the right workshop for you. Descent into Bryce by Steve Henderson, 18 x 18, oil painting, also available as a limited edition signed print . Let's assume
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  • In France in 1663, during the reign of Louis XIV, the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture instituted the Prix de Rome, an art competition award that offered the winning artist a stay of several years at the Palazzo Mancini, in Rome, at the expense
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  • Check out the April Painting of the Month on Facebook and wish the winner congratulations! Join us there too for a daily art fix! Enjoy,
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  • Losing a painting somewhere is never fun, but losing a good painting can drive one to temporary distraction. While teaching our plein air painting workshop in Rocky Mountain National Park last September, I was demonstrating the direct-painting method
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  • I deliberately entitled this post using a word that I have eliminated from my vocabulary: Should. Like sunrise to a new day, the right workshop can lead you to fresh new beginnings in your art pursuits. Awakening by Steve Henderson, 24 x 40, oil painting
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  • As the editor of Artist Daily, I constantly experience art on the screen of my computer. It just isn't possible for me to go everywhere to see everything that I would like to in person, but images in any given online art gallery or art blog have come
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  • Painting is a deep and vast ocean. It is a world full of possibilities. And while I am deeply drawn to that wide-open aspect of it, I'm also super intimidated by it too! I feel like there is no limit to what I can learn, and while I'm thirsty
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  • Not if artist Claudia Seymour has anything to say about it. Recently I had the pleasure of meeting Seymour at the Salmagundi Club in New York City to create two three-hour DVDs with her, including this year's The Art of Painting Flowers in Oil . Spring
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  • A Summer Night by Winslow Homer, 1890, oil on canvas, 30 3/16 x 40 3/16. The word "great" (or "greatest") can be pretty subjective, and lately I've been thinking about how to better qualify the term. To celebrate our 75 th Anniversary
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  • A friend mentioned to me that someone challenged her to read, within one year, a particularly long and demanding book. "I didn't really want to do it," she confessed. "But he's knowledgeable and he was insistent, so I did."
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  • A few weeks ago an artist friend of mine rotated his wrist and made a wincing face after he had finished working on a quick pencil drawing , and it made me realize that drawing isn't just fun and games. It can cause strain in the hand, wrist, elbow
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  • A willingness to experiment with perspective and style is often the determining factor between a competent artist and a master. A new exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art , "Van Gogh Up Close," takes a compelling look at the choices
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  • Patricia Watwood is a skilled oil painter and incredibly deserving of a lot of praise for the art career she has built for herself. She's also quite willing to share her approach to building a network for her art, as she attests below. Enjoy! The
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  • Carnations flowing in a loose watercolor with exciting watermarks and color effects evident within the composition. I have just taken a week of watercolor painting workshops and I came across a problem that many watercolor artists have in common. Many
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  • It's funny when you think about it but the art world is built on copying. However, unlike plagiarism in journalism or literature, copying master drawings is something many artists have incorporate into their studies for centuries because it is an
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  • One of my first self-assigned duties at Artist Daily was to get out in the local American art community and see the kind of work that is being made all over the country, what kind of art techniques are gaining in popularity, and how artists are communicating
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  • "It may seem controversial, but I really think artists are born, not made," says Meagan Shein. Definitely bold words, especially coming from someone who has advanced degrees in fine art and art history. "It doesn't mean that the innate
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  • In our new special issue, American Artist guides you through the most important aspects of the painting process, from selecting your materials to preparing a canvas to advanced techniques for accurately depicting landscapes and figures.
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  • On Location with Michael Stasinos and Mitchell Albala It never ceases to amaze me how unique each painter's vision can be—in everything from the subjects they choose to the color choices they make or the type of painterly handwriting they use
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  • So often with still life paintings, we focus on the objects in the painting first—and rightly so; they do take center stage. But still life artists know that backgrounds can play a major role in the look and feel of a painting as well. A still life
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  • While I was working recently on American Artist's new special issue, The Complete Painter's Handbook ( order now! ), I had a little debate with myself. The question at hand: If you are working to learn how to paint, is it better to focus on following
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  • Portrait artist and painter David McLeod is amidst an exciting project: creating a 10-part video series on portraiture . McLeod takes viewers through the steps that all portrait artists go through to create a compelling, visually appealing portrait, but
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  • Moonrise, La Giudecca, Venice by JMW Turner, 1829, watercolor painting, 8 7/8 x 11 1/4. Delicacy, luminousness, light, and color--these are what you can expect when you look at a watercolor painting . But details? Heck no--or at least, not much. With
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  • Where would painting be without the color blue? It is so easy to obtain artist paints of any hue these days that we forget that in the time of both Michelangelo and Titian, a pure, vibrant blue pigment could only be made by laboriously cooking and hand
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  • Drawing magazine and Artist Daily are proud to announce that Beñat Iglesias Lopez is the winner of Drawing magazine's self-portrait cover competition. Autoteatro No. 2 (Homage to A. Ametzka and G. Martinikorena) by Beñat Iglesias Lopez
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  • Below you'll find artist and blogger Jennifer King's discussion of when a plein air painting can be too real. I don't think she's being harsh at all, but you'll have to decide for yourself. Enjoy! ***** I think it's time for some
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  • When I was six years old, I won an art competition in my local newspaper. As my reward, my drawing appeared in the comics section, right near Hagar the Horrible and Beatle Bailey. I didn't receive any sort of monetary prize, but I didn't care
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  • The pursuit of commercial and fine art has been explored by many artists, including those working in a fantasy or symbolist mode. In this issue, we look at James Gurney, of Dinotopia fame; comic-book-artist-turned-portraitist Everett Raymond Kinstler; and Howard Pyle.
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  • The appeal of tonal drawing is that it truly embodies visual subtlety. Instead of being the domain of line, the techniques that lead to a successful tonal drawing reside in value and shape. But learning how to draw tonality has been, for me, a hard road
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  • In this issue, we look at a few artists who are doing new and exciting things with mixed watermedia, including the 44th Annual American Watercolor Society Gold Medal winner, Jeannie McGuire.
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  • We have always felt that as plein air painters we are observers of the landscape—recording moments and places that can rapidly transform with fleeting changes of light. In a pure landscape, figures and animals are rendered small and insignificant
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  • Portraiture is, in my humble opinion, the domain of artistic masters. All the greats, such as Velazquez, Rembrandt, Goya, and Sargent, can be counted as incredibly skilled and innovative portrait artists in addition to being pretty brilliant at everything
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  • Woman with a Hat (detail) by Henri Matisse, 1905, oil on canvas. Archimedes (detail) by Jose de Ribera, 1630, oil painting. Self-portrait by Vincent van Gogh, 1888, oil painting. A few days ago I was hanging out with a mixed bag of artists. And by mixed
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  • I love that my job allows me to learn something new every day—and the fact that the majority of those discoveries are art-related make them all the more inspiring. Lately I've been in art-historian mode, and I've have been trying to better
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  • Cube figures allow me to focus on the basic shapes of the body. This can lead to a better understanding of the body's form and the creation of works that are incredibly natural, such as Lea Colie Wight's drawing, Kate , conte on paper, 17 x 23
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  • I don't care how many times I see Monet's paintings, they never cease to inspire me. I just had the great pleasure of seeing the new Monet show at the Cincinnati Art Museum with my art buddies, and especially for those of us plein-air artists
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  • The Water Lily Pond by Claude Monet, oil painting, 1899. Mitchell Albala is an inspiring art instructor in the field of landscape painting , and it turns out he's an awesome detective as well. Recently, he did some sleuthing on a rare video clip of
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  • The SourceTek cover art competition opened March 1. It's always an exciting prospect to have your work seen by artists whom you respect and admire. SourceTek, maker of canvas panels, plein air panels and more, certainly agrees. For fourteen years
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  • Yellow Pen by Nat Meade, oil on linen, 24 x 20, 2011. Focusing on formal concerns in art does not make an artist uptight or unimaginative. Quite the opposite actually—pursuing matters of pattern, line, space, and color can prove to jumpstart free
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  • Core Values: The Belvedere Torso and the Birth of the Renaissance The Belvedere Torso The earliest modern record of the Belvedere Torso dates from the 1430s. What we now view as an icon of ancient Greek civilization had just resurfaced in Rome. It was
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  • Sometimes the question shouldn't be what to paint as much as how to paint. There are centuries' worth of artists who fill art history textbooks, but those who stand heads and shoulders above the rest do so because they turned their painting art
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  • There are differing opinions among color theory purists whether white should be considered a color at all, since it represents the absence of hue or chroma, and cannot be made from the three primaries, as black theoretically can be. It's not usually
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  • Artist Daily Member Spotlight: Steve Henderson Summer Breeze by Steve Henderson, oil on canvas, 24 x 24. Artist Daily: Tell me about your oil painting process . Are there rules you adhere to or just the opposite? Steve Henderson: Although I do follow
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  • I love the idea of the recent Museum of Art and Design show, "The Artist As Jeweler," because I love art...and I looooove jewelry. But more than being able to indulge in my obsession for bracelets, the exhibition really shows that artists are
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  • Call it the blues, call it the doldrums, call it what you will--it seems that many of us plein-air painters go through a slump about this time of year. Even if the weather is good enough for painting outdoors, nature isn't always at her finest when
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  • There are a few artists that I would like to watch step-by-step, drawing in their sketchbooks or painting in their studios. Okay, more than a few, but after seeing Van Gogh's drawings, he would definitely be at the top of my list. Cottage Garden by
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  • Inkhead , 2009, oil on canvas, 29 x 16. Dorothy , 2010, oil on canvas, 14 x 14. Anakin Padawan , 2009, oil on canvas, 44 x 28. I have been blogging this past year about preparing for my exhibit, "Myths and Individuals." Now, it's time for
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  • I really think artistic breakthroughs happen most often when you are outside of your usual mode of working, and that includes where and how you work. Think about the times when inspiration has struck you. For me, these moments are often when I am outside
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  • At least I feel that way. I set myself a goal this week—I wanted to learn a few new watercolor painting techniques because I feel like when I contemplate working in watercolor, I only know the "first gear" approaches. I feel like Tim Saternow
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  • When I was young and taking art classes, I was always stumped when my teachers would let us decide individually what to paint. There were just too many creative options and I would simply shut down. One time I went home in a funk, stressed out about what
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  • The aim of being an artist is the ability to create. But with this desire of wishing to constantly achieve wonderful paintings that can be framed or exhibited comes an enormous amount of pressure on our shoulders. We expect to always succeed in our goal
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  • Have you ever been looking for a new place to live, visiting different apartments or houses, and every time you experience a new reaction to a place and its spaces? It always happens to me. Either I love the architecture and light in this one, or the
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  • You may recall that a few months ago I described my horror at learning from an instructor that we would be working on a small drawing of a facial feature for 20 weeks . Novice that I am, 20 weeks seemed an inordinate length of time to spend on a small
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  • Structural drawing by Dan Thompson, mixed media, 15 x 25, 2010. Self-Portrait After Palmer by Dan Thompson, mixed media, 19 x 25, 2003. I've taken notes from a lot of art instructors and sat in or participated in plenty of drawing classes, but when
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  • Intimate Gathering by Russell Irwin, 2002, acrylic and torn paper on board, 48 x 60. When I was flipping through the American Artist magazine archives for mixed media art inspiration, I was prepared to do some pretty extensive digging. I assumed that
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  • If there were any artist, past or present, into whose studio I could magically transport myself and observe him paint, it would be Claude Monet. I have always been intrigued by his painting style, especially his highly textured and complex surfaces. When
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  • Dutch still life painting set the standard for out-of-this-world virtuosity in the 17th century, and I'll never get over the unusual mix of objects artists chose to depict: food of all kinds, polished silverware and gleaming glass, embroidered and
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  • Elton , 11 x 14, mixed media on gesso board, 2011. Yesterday was an interesting day for me. I thought I was near finished with a painting I had been working on for over three months, but when I sent it over to my agent in New York, who I call my third
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  • Artists working today that I admire most all usually have one thing in common—they have developed their own unique contemporary practice while still utilizing classical methods. I've come to realize that I have a bias for artwork that has a
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  • A painting brush isn't animate. It isn't going to teach me how to paint or go about painting art when no one is looking. It needs the hand of the artist to do its job. Penitent Mary Magdalene by Titian, 1560s, oil on canvas. But one thing a brush—by
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  • Old Cedar by Bill Guffey, oil, 18 x 24. Peasant by Joan Langdon, watercolor painting, 10.5 x 11.5. Tomiko by Adriana Guidi, oil on canvas panel, 14 x 18. That's Brian Neher's mantra for his upcoming free art contest , and it is one that I can
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  • I know it is only January, but I'm already thinking spring! And so is the Pantone Color Institute . The organization has just released their seasonal color report, and while this is specifically written for the fashion and design industry, we art
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  • Come like the Artist Daily page on Facebook and see our February Painting of the Month . Enjoy!
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  • When I asked friends and colleagues about landscape painting artists with the best use of color, the conversation got downright heated. Mostly because there's so much to consider when you look at each individual artist's color "theory"
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  • In this issue, our Drawing Fundamentals series moves from looking at the historical roots of copying as an instructional practice to offering specific recommendations about how artists can copy master artwork in order to benefit the most from their efforts.
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  • Pages from Sabin Howard's drawing sketchbook and a finished sculpture. We just put a wrap on the winter issue of Drawing —you'll be seeing it in your mailboxes and on newsstands in February, and can order it in the Artist Daily Store as
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  • Love to draw? Love to surf the internet? Then check out Drawing magazine's new Facebook page —featuring artists, tips on drawing basics, unique educational opportunities, and exclusive news about the magazine and the fast-paced world of drawing
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  • The grapes establish dominance in an otherwise bland still life painting setup. Your still life! By following a few key guidelines when creating still life painting setups, you will be on your way to creating successful, dynamic paintings that really
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  • Recently, artist and our contributing blogger Daniel Maidman wrote a really insightful article about varying your mark making that I want to share because it seems like so many of us are refocusing our interest to drawing, and this is a great approach
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  • Spring in the Hills II by John Hulsey, 5 x 7, oil painting. Whenever we get to feeling that there is nothing really new to be discovered in art or the world, we have to keep in mind that the "undiscovered country" often lies in our own backyards
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  • Children on the Seashore by Joaquin Sorolla, oil on canvas, 1903 . I was once again reading through my copy of the catalog for the 1989 exhibition, The Painter Joaquin Sorolla , and came across this 1933 quote by John Paul Getty in an article called Creative
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  • Eva Mullarky by Kristin Künc, oil on linen, 9 x 13, 2011. I can be a really hard sell when it comes to portraiture because from a beginner painter's perspective, I'm not always sure how to get the most out of a portrait painting session.
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  • Venus Awakes by Patricia Watwood, 2011, oil on canvas, 38 x 34. Karen in White by Paul McCormack, oil on canvas, 40 x 29. Enigma (Self-Portrait) by David Leffel, 2009, oil on canvas, 52 x 34. On Sunday, January 22 nd , the ACOPAL group will celebrate
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  • In a recent painting of mine, you can see the sky and clouds are the lightest value, the towering waves and rocks are the darkest, as they are more vertical to the light of the sky. The flat of the ocean is the second lightest of the values, equating
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  • Astor Place by Emily Falco, watercolor painting, 14 1/2 x 14 1/2, 2009. It warms my heart when I hear artists expressing excitement about their chosen painting medium because artists are the ones in the business of knowing all the ins and outs of their
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  • The Dog, and the Great White Shark Jaw by Jamie Wyeth The Groom by Daniel Graves Friends by Dan McCaw Save the Date for... American Artist's 75 th Anniversary Exhibition April 2013 | The Salmagundi Club | New York City In celebration of American Artist's
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  • Slumber at Chuckwalla Valley (detail) by Sharon Allicotti, drawing. If art were a banquet, I would constantly be going back for more helpings of life drawing. It is a consistently rewarding artistic experience because I've never met a more inspiring—and
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  • Our contributing bloggers John Hulsey and Ann Trusty of The Artist's Road wrote a really informative blog about how to get the most out of a photograph of your painting or drawing, and I wanted to share it with you. Enjoy! Film holder frame attached
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  • Leah by Patricia Watwood, pencil on toned paper, 18 x 14, 2011. I have just finished two big projects. Foremost, my show Myths and Individuals opened at the end of October at Saint Louis University Museum of Art. In two months the show will open for it's
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  • I get excited and a bit chagrined whenever I discover oil painters of the past that I've never heard of. I realize that I'm no walking encyclopedia, yet I like to think I've got sound footing in oil painting . But the history of fine art oil
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  • Check out how we are starting the new year with our first Facebook Painting of the Month for 2012 . Enjoy!
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  • Don't give up your plein air focus over the winter months. Try to paint from life indoors and keep sketching. ( Melting Snow by Ben Fenske, 60 x 75, oil on canvas.) For some of us, winter weather is just a bit too unpredictable and chilly to spend
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  • Precious by Russell Irwin, paper mosaic. Okay, that might have been a little too Gollum from Lord of the Rings , but Russell Irwin's latest mixed media collage titled Precious is certainly mesmerizing because of the unusual creative process that goes
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  • Back II (Joshua) by Martha Mayer Erlebacher, 2003, oil on canvas, 42 x 42. The human body is beautiful—as a whole and in its parts. Body drawings that accentuate the sensuous lines of the body and the power of the human form are steeped in a knowledge
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  • We spent a lot of painting time along the cliffs outside San Juan. Painting can be a pretty isolating affair, and though I love the alone time spent with my muse, I miss the collective energy that working in a group of like-minded colleagues provides
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  • Happy Birthday to us! In our expanded March/April issue, American Artist celebrates its 75th anniversary by revisiting some of the most inspiring artists we’ve covered throughout our history. We also feature our annual workshop and art school directory.
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  • The botanical gardens in Washington, DC, near the Capitol. When I'm visiting family in Virginia during winter, I always make a point to walk through the botanical gardens near the Capitol in Washington, DC. It is one of my favorite places, and the
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  • Philadelphia Story II--Spires by Sarah Yeoman, watercolor painting, 14 x 20. I don't mean literally shrink it, but if you take a photo of your painting and reduce it to thumbnail size and it still holds together compositionally, you've got a good
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  • Watercolor artist Thomas Schaller achieves convincing and dynamic effects in his skies ( Salisbury Cathedral , watercolor painting). I know it is a bias, but sometimes I can't help thinking that painting skies belongs to a particular realm of watercolor
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  • Turquoise Sky 3 , acrylic on panel, 5 x 5. All works by Lisa Snow Lady. I give a lot of credit to professional and semi-professional artists who seek out ongoing training or the advice of peers, even after their initial successes. I firmly believe that
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  • Orange and Holly by Alan Bateman, acrylic painting. Alan also won our Move Over Hallmark! Holiday Card contest . It's the time of year for decorated garlands, ribbons and bows, and cheery lights, all of which have me in a festive mood to create a
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  • There are so many significant milestones that an artist can mark his or her career by, but the one that is most exciting for me is the possibility of drawing people and capturing their likeness, whether it is a certain gesture they have or just the interesting
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  • I plan on spending quality time with the catalog published by the Whitney Museum on Lyonel Feininger ( Gaberndorf II , oil on canvas, 1924, 39 x 30.5). Take this time and don't draw or paint. Okay, I was kind of thinking the world would end if I said
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  • Painting together with family and friends of all ages can be really rewarding. Art has been a gift in my life. It has allowed me to live more richly and fully than I could otherwise imagine. But I'm especially lucky because art found me; I didn't
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  • A photo of the cast I am drawing. My drawing, in progress. You may remember that in the fall of this year, I discussed Darren Kingsley's class and his comment that we would be working for many weeks on our drawing of a facial feature in his class
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  • Hi all, We've chosen the final Facebook Painting of the Month for 2011. Join me in congratulating the artist and here's to twelve more amazing paintings in the New Year!
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  • Grisaille copy of Jacques-Louis David's Patroclus , oil on linen, 48 x 78. At this time of year, we all travel so much that it can be a real challenge to figure out how to bring our painting supplies with us when we visit family and friends. Whether
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  • Figure drawing by Judith St. Ledger-Roty, charcoal drawing, 2011. I have been taking a figure drawing class that focuses on doing a comparatively long figure pose, working in charcoal. (We do one minute, five minute, and ten minute drawings, too, so 'long'
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  • In the December/January issue of American Artist magazine, the editors and staff put out feelers throughout the art community to find artists who are established or up and coming, and deserve recognition. They had limited space in the print issue, so
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  • I adore color—deep ruby reds, bold blues, verdant greens, rich golden yellows...I could go on and on, but one thing that I often forget in my zeal is that color is not just a matter of hue. Saturation and subtle color layers also play a huge part
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  • My view of Michelangelo's David in the Galleria dell' Accademia in Florence, Italy. I recently returned from my first trip to Italy, the inspiring and enriching experiences of which could fill the next year's worth of "Art for Thought"
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  • Matthew Carr refused to use pure white in his drawings, treating his surface with charcoal before he began. ( Gordon , 2006, conté pencil on prepared charcoal paper, 56 1/2 x 44.) As you all might remember, charcoal drawing and I haven't always
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  • I want to thank all of you for all the wonderful entries for this year's Move Over Hallmark! Holiday Card Contest . Who needs to go buy a holiday card from a drug store when you're as creative as, well, all of you! You all have helped us celebrate
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  • The Honorable Clarence Harmon, Mayor of St. Louis by Patricia Watwood, oil on canvas, 24 x 18, oval, 2002. Collection of St. Louis City Hall. Someone recently asked me what I did to get recognized and become part of the art scene in my hometown of St
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  • This issue considers artists who paint the figure in context, such as Martha Erlebacher, who paints figures in classically informed configurations, and acrylic artist John K. Harrell, who offers a demonstration of how he paints city scenes filled with pedestrians, trees, and bright lights.
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  • Ariadne by Janet Rogers, watercolor painting. Since coming to Artist Daily, my parents are both super supportive of me and our web community. My mom does her best to get everyone she knows to join us at Artist Daily, and my dad buys me art supplies in
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  • T o Be Where There's Life by Ryan Coleman, oil on canvas, 30 x 40, 2010. The coolest thing I ever learned about painting flowers , specifically how to paint a rose, was when a painting teacher told me that you paint them by not painting them. Back
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  • This short video is excerpted from a demonstration I gave at my annual plein air painting workshop in Skagit Valley, Washington. ( Gage Academy of Art , July, 2010.) The video talks about painting strategies in general and gives specific examples of the
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  • In this issue we start the new year with the delicate but bold paintings of Law Wai Hin, whose landscapes, still lifes, and floral paintings combine Eastern and Western sensibilities to create a personal vision.
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  • Upper Ridge at Dusk , 2011, oil on panel, 18 x 18 . Mt. Shuksan in Sunlight , 2010, oil on panel, 12 x 12. At my April 2011 exhibition at Lisa Harris Gallery, I gave an hour-long presentation on my "In Sunlight" series. This was a special opportunity
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  • Sonata of the Sea--Finale by Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, 1908. One of my favorite movements in art is the Symbolist movement of the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries. The artists were so free in exploring what mattered to them—personal
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  • Winter Radiance by Claudia Seymour, 2005, pastel, 15 x 11. What sort of fixative, if any, should pastel artists apply to finished works? "Used properly and sparingly, fixative is a godsend," says artist Claudia Seymour. Our experts agree—but
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  • We've been discussing shocking your system to keep your art practice from falling into routines. Another excellent means of accomplishing shock is to switch media. By and large, I work in two media: graphite and white pencil on toned paper, and oil
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  • The Coming Storm by George Inness, 1879, oil on canvas, 27 1/4 x 41 3/4. Are you as bored of pretty outdoor painting scenes as I am? My eyes just seem to glaze over when I see a plein air painting scene with picture perfect sunlight over an idyllic landscape
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  • My family and I at my opening. Cute bunch, right? The show included works from the last 10 years. I know it's been a while since I've written. Let's see--the last time was just when I got back from my summer vacation. And now it's....November
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  • Ugh, after all the holiday eating I've been doing, I should probably go exercise or run laps. But as a warm up I thought I would talk about physicality, power, and movement in oil painting . Maybe this'll be the inspiration I need to get off my
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  • This being the day after Thanksgiving, we celebrate leftovers in my house—and pretty much all other activities that result in eating. So I thought, why mess with family tradition? I'm devoting today's column to one subject matter I rarely
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  • All the hard work and unique vision that we pour into our painting and drawing can result in artwork that we are proud of. The next step is to make an accurate photographic record of our art to share with friends, collectors, galleries and perhaps to
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  • The Gossips by Norman Rockwell, 1948. I think every one of us loves Norman Rockwell's illustrations, whether it is a little bit or a lot. They tell stories and always seem to capture expressions and reactions so perfectly. My favorite has always been
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  • Pastel drawing by Lea Colie Wight. At Studio Incamminati, it is not unusual for instructors or fellows who are not teaching a particular class to come in to draw or paint beside the students. This happened recently when Lea Colie Wight joined in a figure
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  • Faded Glory by Rose Frantzen, 36 x 48, oil painting. If there were daredevils of art, I certainly would not be one of them. I'm always hesitating and rethinking what I'm doing. (In my day-to-day life I'm not such a scaredy cat—I swear
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  • David Hockney asserted that Jan Van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait was created with optical tools. The camera lucida is something I've known about for years, but I didn't know there was such controversy surrounding it--or that people felt so passionately
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  • Lake Tahoe by Albert Bierstadt, 1868. In their day, the Hudson River School landscape painters were so popular with the public that people would line up and pay a fair amount of money just to view a single painting. So I think it's safe to say that
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  • I love this post from Cate, the web editor of Cloth Paper Scissors , which is the mixed media sister site of Artist Daily. Enjoy! Doodles by Robin Olsen, designed by using prompts. "I'm so bored." Now there's a lament anyone who's
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  • I want to share an inspiring story I just heard from one of our members, Mark Beale . Enjoy! Bryce Canyon by Bruce Stam, oil painting, 8 x 10. Backwater Twilight by Mark Beale, oil painting, 9 x 12. Bruce Stam and I are two landscape painters from opposite
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  • This is a monotype print I just made of a winter scene. I went over it with pastel to get the motion of the swirling, whirling snow. It'll make a great card for some lucky friend this season! I've long been fascinated with holiday greeting cards
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  • Lee's Ranch - Sunny Day by Camille Przewodek, 9 x 12, oil on canvas. Even now it sounds like a beautiful, incredible, impossible thing to accomplish. I mean, paint light ? It seemed like magic to me at first. And I didn't understand what it all
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  • Taking just a few minutes to survey a scene and sketch it can help work out any challenges you might come across with the orientation of objects, color, and more. Okay, it isn't a he or a she, but an 'it': composition! I know, not the handsome
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  • Drawing of a nose by Darren Kingsley with graphite pencil. The fall session at Studio Incamminati has begun, and I am taking classes with Darren Kingsley. One is in charcoal, and the other in graphite pencil . Last year as a new student, I was introduced
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  • Frederic Edwin Church's Aurora Borealis would make a stunning holiday card. Who needs to go buy a holiday card from a drug store when you're as creative as, well, all of us! Celebrate the holiday season with us at Artist Daily and American Artist
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  • Another fun idea from Cate, the online editor for Cloth Paper Scissors . You'll never look at oatmeal the same way again, and will have an easy surface design technique to start your next painting with. Enjoy! Fabric art quilt by Lisa Kerpoe . Fall
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  • Kinder Love by Jason Bard Yarmosky, 2011, pencil drawing, 18 x 24. Frontal Study of Naked Man by Leonardo, 1503- 09, pen and ink drawing, 9 1/4 x 5 3/4. Looking East by Kerry Brooks, colored pencil drawing. I'm excited to report that the fall issue
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  • Darren Kingsley Self-Portraiture: An Essential Artist's Exercise Regardless of style, artists are known to return time and again to working from the life model. The human form speaks to us on an instinctual level and offers a wellspring of fresh inspiration
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  • Every time I get on Artist Daily I am a little bowled over by the strides and accomplishments we all are making in our art. I get the same feeling when I look at the winners of the Utrecht 3rd Annual Art Competition , whose winners were just announced
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  • Last time we discussed the idea of switching up art practice techniques . The concept was that, while repetition builds skills, change keeps the mind sharp and the work lively. I've been thinking about ways I personally switch up techniques. The first
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  • We plein-air artists seem to put a lot of emphasis on traveling to far off places to paint, don't we? The fields of Tuscany, the rugged California coast, the farmhouses of the Cotswolds all seem to beckon. And heeding that call can be fantastic. I
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  • Delphinium by Sherrie McGraw, oil painting, 8 x 10. Sherrie McGraw's work always surprises me because she doesn't allow the objects she is painting to dictate how she paints. Instead, McGraw paints to articulate form, masses, and her own ideas
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  • Hi all, Check to see whose work was selected to be our Facebook Painting of the Month for November. Wish the winner congrats! Enjoy!
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  • This is a blog about drawing people from one of my favorite co-workers, Cate, the online editor of Cloth Paper Scissors . Enjoy! Proportion is key to life drawing. When I was a kid growing up in Michigan, I was privileged to take classes at Cranbrook
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  • Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I by Nicholas Hilliard (attributed), 1585. I can only imagine the excitement and thrill of sitting for any one of the great portrait painters in history such as Bronzino, Velazquez, and Sargent. But then my mind goes directly
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  • Optimal Orientation of Subject and Artist in Plein Air Before the first daub of paint is squeezed out of the tube and brush is put to canvas, many plein air painters have already set themselves up for failure. How? By selecting a site that doesn't
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  • This is one of the artist's more traditional pieces in terms of his painting process. ( Raspberry House by Jamie Wyeth, 1988, watercolor, 22 1/2 x 28 1/2.) Watercolor is one of those wondrous materials that can be manipulated in so many different
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  • This issue considers the gentle and peculiar graphite portraits of Jason Bard Yarmosky, who draws his grandparents wearing various costumes in order to reassess cultural assumptions about old age. It also includes another article that explains how artists can use the proportions of the figure to aid
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  • Drawing by Edward Schmidt. When I was the one in charge of my infant cousin, I would always scramble frantically for ways to keep him entertained. Toys, sounds, and funny faces—I tried everything. But the most memorable way I kept him happy was
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  • Demonstration: Exploring Composition Through a Limited Focus A "limited focus" isn't limiting at all, but expands our options in composition The first compositional move any painter makes is to apply a limited focus. Whether it be a still
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  • Camille au métier by Claude Monet, 1875, oil painting. "My rejection at the Salon brought an end to my hesitation [to settle in Paris] since after this failure I can no longer claim to cope... alas, that fatal rejection has virtually taken
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  • In honor of 2012, this issue offers a survey of 12 new or unknown artists, based on the recommendations of respected art professionals. We also feature our art materials buying guide, with shopping tips for all your studio needs.
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  • ...are ones that paint self-portraits. As we all well know, artists have a lot of firepower at their disposal. It comes from being trained to look critically and creatively at the things you see. For an artist to turn that kind of acuity on him- or herself
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  • This December, Signilar —the maker of top notch art instruction videos—is hosting a painting workshop led by portrait artist Judith Carducci in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. To gush just a lil' bit, this seems like an amazing opportunity
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  • When discussing landscape painting , we often hear the phrase "capturing a sense of place." What does that mean to you? To me, it means so much more than just recording the physical attributes of the location. It goes way beyond suggesting the
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  • Anselm Kiefer is not a landscape painter by any stretch of the imagination, and yet his incredibly powerful work is based in and of the land. Observing his mixed media paintings and sculpture has taught me a lot about what a truly impactful landscape
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  • But that is exactly what makes them so powerful. I've never been more moved by seeing a work in person than I am when I see Kiefer's. They floor me. As I said in my other post on Kiefer , it certainly has to do, in part, with the fact that his
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  • Flamenco by Ann Trusty, oil painting, 48 x 60. The science community is busy investigating the mechanisms and processes by which people are able to perceive the world around them and make visual sense of it. There are many basic questions still to be
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  • 5 Step-by-Step Demonstrations Show You How to Capture The Movement of Water, Create Vibrant, Dense Washes, and Collaborate with Other Artists; Create a Figure in 30 Seconds
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  • Here it is: Make better art by learning from better artists. Duh, right? But I don't think that way often enough. I'm all about looking at artwork—more and more and more artwork—but sometimes I don't really put my thinking cap
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  • On the Threshold of Eternity by Vincent Van Gogh, 1890, oil. Collection Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands. Vincent van Gogh, today recognized by generations for his contributions to art, was largely ignored and dismissed in his own
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  • I love the idea of the Museum of Art and Design show of the same name— The Artist as Jeweler —because I love art...and I looooove jewelry. But more than being able to indulge in my obsession for bracelets, this exhibition really shows that
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  • Click on any of the above images to see David Kassan's Drawing the Eyes . That is no small task, no doubt about it. Yet hundreds of thousands of us search every year online about how to draw eyes. Mostly, I think, because we take drawing eyes for
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  • Under the Awning by Joaquin Sorolla, oil painting, 1910. "There is nothing truer than truth. All the mistakes committed by great artists are due to their having separated themselves from truth, believing that their imagination is stronger...There
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  • Isn't hanging a painting as easy as that? Yeah, right! There are so many ways that you can showcase your work, and each one can make such a difference in how each painting or drawing is perceived. Unframed. I prefer the art that I have in my apartment
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  • Dear American Artist Reader, American Artist will celebrate its 75th anniversary in 2012! In celebration of that important milestone, we are rolling out a new design for the magazine. We pored over past issues, and the various incarnations of our logo
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  • Ernest Lawson (1873 - 1939) came to maturity at the dawn of the 20th century, so his work was modern and gritty and real. His are not the idyllic landscape paintings of Corot , nor are they the dazzling light shows in Monet's plein air paintings
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  • Am I built like Jason Statham? Hell no! But a parallel approach to art practice has helped me when I make pictures of guys who are. I find it useful to phrase the ongoing practice of painting and drawing in exercise metaphors. Whatever your daily practice
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  • Come see who the lucky artist is , and like us on Facebook, why don'tcha? Happy Autumn!
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  • Study for Gapstow Bridge in Sunlight by Bennett Vadnais, oil on canvas, 12 x 16, 2007. Fall is my favorite time of year. It's my birthday season, so of course I'm partial, but I also just love the smell of autumn. It's crisp and clean, and
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  • The last two editions of Plein Air Painting were a huge success—they flew off the shelves—and now the newest edition of the beloved magazine is back with even more on-site landscape painting instruction, handpicked by the trusted editors at American Artist, introducing the new special-issue
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  • 25 Skilled Artists Teach Their Best Techniques; Step-by-Step Lessons & Lists of Materials; How to Paint Floral Still Lifes With Skill & Understanding
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  • Reflect Your True Vision with Accurate Form Now you can paint the human form with the depth and detail it deserves - your artwork will come alive with this exciting special issue from American Artist: Portrait and Figure Painting Highlights Fall 2010. Improve the detail of your portraits with 100 pages
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  • 20 Top Artists Reveal How To Adjust to Regional Sites, Pack What You Need, Scale-Up Sketches, & Travel Safely Abroad; The history of the Plein Air Movement, and much more!
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  • Farm Visitors by Hardie Gramatky, watercolor, 1971. I can't get over the fact that Watercolor magazine is celebrating its 25 th year. For a quarter of a century it has been the eyes and ears of watermedia artists all over the country, and has featured
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  • In this issue, Kenneth J. Procter discusses his work in the medium of powdered charcoal and looks at his own evolution as an artist. The issue also features a special section on portraiture, a subject with great expressive potential despite the restrictions portrait artists sometimes must work under
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  • My early charcoal drawing. The charcoal drawing using the Studio's method. Once again, time for me to go back to school at Studio Incamminati . In preparing for classes, I have been reviewing my last year's drawings again. I am reminded of something
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  • Notice how the composition of this sparse still life is deft--from the angle of the bottle to the serpentine curve of the ivy sprig. (Dried Ivy by Kristin Kunc, 8 x 12, oil on linen, 2008). I'm not a knick-knack girl, but I do really have a connection
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  • Looking at Leonardo da Vinci's sketch of birds I imagine how the artist likely thought about more than just the birds themselves. He would have been caught up in ideas of flight and soaring in air. That's the power of a sketch. It can transport
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  • I'll be honest with you all--I am not a painting technician. I read a lot about art and, as you know, love to look at paintings and drawings all day long, but I am still a babe in the woods when it comes to many methods and approaches to painting
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  • Employ A Wide Range Of Media And Styles; Spanish Masters From Ribera To Goya; Mapping The Face Through Large Self-Portraits; How To Draw Active, Lifelike Figures; Advice For Drawing Leaves+ Plants In Perspective.
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  • Mastering the art of simplicity; large-scale graphite drawings; improve your drawings through anatomy; 15 cover contest winners revealed; how to draw the outline of a figure.
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  • Paris by Danny McCaw, 24 x 16. Not to be a whiner, but I don't have an artistic legacy to build on. So far as I know, no one in my family is an artist or has any particular leanings towards painting or drawing. That's why I'm so enamored with
    Read More >>
  • But I think it's time for some straight talk. I've participated in many, many plein air painting critiques over the years, and I can't begin to tell you how often I've been faced with landscape paintings that are a little off. Perhaps
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  • And I am! I'm calling myself out on the carpet. I've got a handful of mirrors in my apartment and don't take advantage of what is right in front of me. Which is why I'm fired up about getting people to do more self-portraits--including
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  • Manhattan Nocturne by Frank Federico, pastel painting, 20 x 24. I have a tried and true love affair going with color. I'm drawn to it across the spectrum, but I'm a late bloomer when it comes to pastel painting, which has to be some kind of crime
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  • Norwegian artist Odd Nerdrum, currently facing time in prison for tax fraud, is certainly a character, taking on more of a dramatic persona than most people do in their day-to-day lives. He's also a bit of a polarizing figure. I know artists who think
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  • Cast drawing and painting is a tried and true method of learning how to draw in a classical manner. It forces a student to acquire new perceptual and conceptual skills in order to complete the given task at hand. Normally, the process takes several months
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  • “Most artists do not have the luxury of an agent, spouse, or supporter to raise their value in the art world, so they are left to their own devices to create a marketing plan that best positions them in the highly competitive world of fine-art sales
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  • This issue marks the 25th Anniversary of Watercolor. To celebrate, we present 25 tips, 25 painting locations, and 25 tools that today's top watermedia painters say they can't do without. We also take a look at the innovations of early practitioners and trace the masterful use of watercolor throughout
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  • This issue of American Artist features consummate classicists Jacob Collins and Daniel E. Greene—artists who champion figurative art and its embrace of beauty and humanist thought. The autumn season is approaching, and the lazy days of summer will soon be a hazy (and humid) memory. Our collective
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  • The October issue of American Artist explores the infinite world that lies outside of our understanding. This display of mystery and magnificence, brilliantly depicted by the 19th-century landscape artist Albert Bierstadt, has inspired generations of artists to paint their ?finest works. We hope the
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  • Realism today comprises a myriad of working styles that derails any effort to define it based on select studio practices—such as whether an artist works primarily from life or from photographs. Nor can realism be equated with an effort to capture exacting detail, which would leave out the probing
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  • As the sun grows warmer and the days lengthen, we begin to yearn for our favorite vacation spots-—seaside towns, mountain-top retreats, or maybe just our backyards. In this issue we take a look at art inspired by romantic getaways and the carefree days of summers past and present.
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  • Using Edges to Improve Your Compositions; How to Draw Arms With Strength and Conviction; Drawing Fundamentals: The Figure in Action; Depict the colors of the Night; Dramatic Shadows for Subtle Effect.
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  • These four oil paintings have something in common. Yes, of course, they were all painted by George Inness (1825-1894), one of the greatest American landscape painters of all time. But there's something else, an incredibly valuable lesson. Have you
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  • I'm a sucker for a good cause, and the Yellow Barn Studio and Gallery is putting on a great one this October: The Green Paint Out, a plein air landscape painting competition with the mission of preserving and protecting America's national parks
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  • Sarah Simblet (her pen drawing, Isis 38 , above) taught me a lot about how intertwined the semblance of motion and mark-making are in really good drawings. Maybe it is part of having an arts career or maybe it is just me, but I love books and magazines
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  • Drawings of horses in the Chauvet caves. We recently watched the Werner Herzog film, Chauvet: Cave of Forgotten Dreams . Herzog made the film about the prehistoric, 30,000- to 32,000 year-old cave art discovered in 1994 in the Ardeche region of France
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  • When I flipped through the Fall issue of Watercolor magazine—celebrating their 25 th year in print (whoop whoop!)—I was super impressed with the feature article on "25 Artists to Watch." It confirms what I know is happening out in
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  • The September Painting of the Month on the Artist Daily Facebook page has been selected. Check it out, see who it is, and wish him or her congratulations! And don't forget to Like the Artist Daily Facebook page to get a chance to win a bonus bundle
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  • Daniel Gerhartz is a prize-winning artist and workshop instructor, and his new book, Not Far From Home , is a high-level guide that both inspires and instructs. The book's pages are filled with beautiful reproductions of Gerhartz's paintings as
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  • Learn classical techniques with an inspiring guide that shows you how to create stunning pieces with ease and confidence. Make your colors sing and enhance your process—top contemporary masters of today show you how. Challenge yourself with more complicated arrangements and develop the confidence
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  • Recollection of Mortefontaine by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, landscape oil painting, 1864. One of my great heroes in art is Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (1796-1875), the world-famous French artist who is still considered one of the best landscape artists
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  • Marjorie Forgues' figure drawing, day 1. Marjorie Forgues' figure drawing, day 2. Taking a painting or drawing class is always a learning experience, but often I find I learn a great deal from other artists in the class as well. This is especially
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  • Nicole at Mille Fleurs 3 , acrylic painting on canvas, 48 x 30, 2010. In the Afternoon Light , acrylic painting on canvas, 48 x 30, 2011. Contrast is the difference between light and dark values. The human eye is able to see clearly across a contrast
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  • Odd Nerdrum gave a two-hour lecture on his philosophies on painting in the library of the General Society of Mechanics & Tradesmen building at American Artist's Weekend With the Masters Intensive: New York City this past June. There are certain
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  • One of the offerings in the show is Degas' Two Dancers , a pastel painting on Canson vellum paper. I wish! But there is an amazing art show going on that I should be going to (along with eating assorted baked goods and cheeses and chocolates). Matisse
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  • Hi all! It's time to submit your drawing, painting, and sculpture to the Utrecht Art Supplies 3rd Annual Art Competition ! I'm excited to see all the entries and who is going to take home all this great stuff! Details about the prizes below. And
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  • Oil painting demonstration by Robert Liberace. To listen to Robert Liberace talk during one of his demonstrations, sometimes, fleetingly, it sounds to me like there is an occasional contradiction. The most recent example I can point to is when he talked
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  • Rhododendron by James Sulkowski, 2001, oil painting. Notice how the flowers are arranged in a curving S-shape, starting in the back and bring your eye to the foreground. Most artists have a love-hate relationship with floral painting. There's plenty
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  • The cave paintings of Lascaux. Legend has it that Pablo Picasso remarked upon emerging from a visit to Lascaux cave that, "we have discovered nothing new in art in 17,000 years." The beautiful artwork from this ancient era is a reminder of our
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  • I was on a studio visit the other day to artist Daniel Baltzer 's place in Harlem and the first thing that grabbed my attention—even before looking at his paintings (!)—was this cool little contraption he had in the middle of his studio
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  • Notice the chalk lines drawn over the figure to assess and check the proportion and length of her limbs. I have finally finished my oil painting , Leaves of Grass , which I have blogged about previously. In all, the painting probably took nearly 2 months
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  • Check out the Artist Daily Facebook Painting of the Month for August and wish the artist congrats!
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  • My version of an art "mixed tape" is a bunch of really great info and inspiration for us as we head into the home stretch of summer. Here are several of my favorite recent Artist Daily blog entries and American Artist online articles that have
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  • John had to deal with rapidly changing weather conditions as he worked on his plein air watercolor painting, Cub Lake Trailhead . We outdoor painters are always on the search for beautiful places to paint, and so we become inveterate travelers and explorers
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  • This is a long pose drawing that made it into my "evaluate" pile. Part of the artistic learning process for me is learning how to evaluate my work, not on a piece by piece basis, but collectively. This summer I am looking at my drawing art works
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  • All you landscape artists who live in the dry, deserty parts of the world, or you plein air painters in the wet, watery parts of the world, bear with me, but those of us who live in the lushly vegetated parts of the world face a big challenge: green!
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  • For this brush and ink drawing, I applied what I learned from da Vinci, but moved in my own direction. Sad is the disciple who does not advance his master. --Leonardo da Vinci Maybe you remember--in my earlier post when I recommended that you choose a
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  • Okay, I don't really mean that. I was just trying to get your attention. But I kind of do mean it because so often when dealing with how to paint a composition, I follow the same process day in and day out, which is why the idea of transferring images
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  • The industry’s favorite plein air magazine is back with more of what you love! Last year, Plein Air Painting magazine flew off the shelves! Capture info from on-site studies, direct observations, and outdoor painting instruction from top plein air painters of today. Perfect your plein air painting
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  • Left: Kem , detail, 2004, 48 x 24, oil on canvas. Right: Hands #1 , 2011, 24 x 24, oil on canvas. I am not claiming either painting is better, but without my figure drawing practice between 2004 and 2011 I couldn't have painted the newer painting
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  • I used to waste oodles of time blocking in my plein air paintings until I finally learned some great tips for doing them fast, such as skipping the drawing, establishing the value range first, and addressing each set of values in a logical order. Here's
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  • Laura demonstrates a lot of smart fine-art color methods using a fiber-arts approach. I love color but I have to stop myself from rolling my eyes when talk circles around to the color wheel. Snore! We all know the deal with the color wheel. No need to
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  • Fallen Tree, Mississippi by Jeffrey Smith, 11 x 14, oil painting. My studio is filled with stuff to look at: still life objects, postcards of paintings that I love, and written notes of things to think about and remember as I'm working on a painting
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  • Revue by Everett Shinn, 1908, oil painting, 18 x 24. Everett Shinn was one of the Ashcan School artists or "The Eight," which was led by Robert Henri and included Arthur B. Davies , William Glackens , Edward Hopper, Ernest Lawson , George Luks
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  • Ocean II by John Hulsey, 30 x 40, oil painting. The painting Ocean II was created from a smaller plein air study created at sunrise on Isle of Palms, South Carolina. I liked the composition and colors, and especially the way the wet sand mirrored the
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  • A gray-scale photograph of my plein air oil painting subject. If you read my last post , you know I'm a believer in spending time planning a composition before diving into a plein-air painting . Yet, I also want to get started as soon as possible
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  • Pandora by Patricia Watwood, oil on canvas. I've had it in my head to make a "Pandora" oil painting for a while now. In the myth, Pandora is overcome with curiosity (well, who wouldn't be??) and she opens the proverbial box and releases
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  • Woman on a Treadmill by Kate Sikorski, figure drawing, 2009. I am a firm believer in starting a life drawing with the envelope—the shape you first draw before anything else. I've come to think of it as one of my drawing basics. This envelope
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  • Watercolor study by John Hulsey, 7 1/2 x 7. Being strong dog proponents (especially for dogs in the studio, where they never provide negative commentary), and being the caretakers (or is it the other way around?) of two ancient (in dog years) Great Pyrenees
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  • July is here and let's celebrate our freedom with some friggin' art. Come see the Facebook Painting of the Month and congratulate your fellow artist. And like the Artist Daily Facebook page if you haven't already. Enjoy the weekend!
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  • Believe it or not, this piece of cloth was sky painted by artist Terry Maddox using light-sensitive paints. Yowza--it's beautiful. Who says I have to start painting or drawing on a blank page? Some of my favorite drawings are doodles that are on torn
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  • Sunrise River II by John Hulsey, oil on canvas. "You can observe a lot by just watching." - Yogi Berra I was reminded of this quote as I was sitting on the boardwalk in Constitution Marsh on the Hudson River near where we used to live. I hadn't
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  • This is an underdrawing for Michael's large oil painting, Air (72 x 104). I really feel like I've grown so much during my time at Artist Daily, and in large part that is because of my exposure to the staff of and featured artists in American Artist
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  • Portrait of Ginevra di Benci by Leonardo da Vinci, 1474-1476, oil painting on wood, 16.5 x 14.5. I've described the most important technical parts of my study of Da Vinci: line and anatomy . When I began to study how to paint, I opted not to follow
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  • A view of the lands around Sagamore Hill estate, where the Teaching Studios plein air competition will take place. This is such a neat opportunity that I just had to share with you, and it is so close to me, geographically speaking, that it would be like
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  • I don't want to learn how to paint from just anyone. I don't mean that snobbishly, but I know how I work and learn. I am a visual learner and I learn by doing. Hearing someone drone on and on makes me want to get up and run around the room, so
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  • A photo of the plein air landscape site I chose to paint. I can still recall the first morning I saw this little bend in the river ike it was yesterday. The air was still cool and breezy, the sun was glinting off the water, the bees in their hive were
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  • The ACOPAL show featured contemporary American Realist painting. Whenever I step inside the beautiful and historic National Arts Club, on Gramercy Park in Manhattan, I'm reminded of how long it has been a supportive home for American Realism. In May
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  • Wait until you are in front of your outdoor painting scene before deciding what to tone your surface. I've found that how you prepare your canvas has a huge impact on the finished result of your plein-air painting . Do you start your painting right
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  • As any artist can attest, versatility is the key to a long and illustrious career. The ability to work with a variety of media, subject matter, and techniques helps keep skills up-to-date, the mind engaged, and one's creativity consistently challenged. With that in mind, we've decided to use
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  • Ellen Cooper’s In Defiance of Erebus won the People’s Choice and First Place Award. After participating in a panel discussion about career goals for artists at this year’s Portrait Society of America Conference I wanted to share a few more tips that I use to keep my art growing and
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  • Plein air watercolor sketches of sites in Kansas and Charleston, South Carolina. All works by John Hulsey. It took me awhile to realize it, but I have invented a time machine. I didn’t set out to invent a time machine exactly, but like many other
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  • I'm graced with a pretty decent-sized competitive spirit, and I want to infect you with it too! Right now Artist Daily has more than 800 Likes on Facebook and I feel like 1,000 Likes are so close I can taste them. Not that I want to taste them--ew
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  • Come and see , and give the winner a well-deserved 'Like' to show your support. Until next month...
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  • For the Portrait Society of America Conference in Atlanta this year, I was invited to participate in a panel on Professionalism, Leadership, and Service. I was asked to speak to “Building a Career for the Long Term.” Now, anyone who saw my tax returns for 2010 would NOT have put me on a short
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  • In a recent post on how to paint clouds at sunset , we diagrammed a pastel painting and explained a bit about the types of clouds one may encounter when painting outdoors . This time, we have dissected a watercolor, Ghost Ranch IV , that I painted in New Mexico near Georgia O’Keefe’s house
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  • I wanted to pass along a bunch of free eBooks I came across at Cloth Paper Scissors . Each one gives you new avenues of artistic exploration--whether it is unusual processes or new media.
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  • Get instant improvement on your portraits, landscapes, and still life’s from master teachers.
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  • In John Milner’s introduction to his book The Studios of Paris: The Capital of Art in the Late 19th Century , he shares an interesting, albeit semi-amusing, quote from Ernest Meissonier, one of the most successful artists of his era. Meissonier
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  • Painting flowers is sometimes a study in the subtlety of color, as in Ann's flower oil painting, Philadelphus III (oil, 12 x 16). Painting large flower portraits has given me the opportunity to explore what seem to be the nearly infinite shades and
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  • Art is a matter of infinite variation and the knowledge of a few tried-and-true essentials. As instructors, Scott Burdick and Susan Lyon bridge these two by focusing on sound technical practice in the larger context of what contemporary artist face working today--and the tools that are at our disposal
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  • Love your space as much as you love your craft American Artist Studios is back and bigger than ever with a special issue devoted to making beautiful and functional spaces for all your creative needs.
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  • Do you ever feel like you’re just painting the same old same old when you go outside to paint? Couple of trees, maybe some water—it’s actually fairly easy to fall into the rut of painting the same subjects again and again. At least, that’s how I get to feeling on occasion.
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  • Golden by Daniel Gerhartz, oil on canvas, 16 x 12. Since its inception in 2009, Weekend With the Masters Workshop & Conference has brought together some of the top instructors of representational art under one roof for a long weekend of workshops
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  • When John Hulsey and Ann Trusty told me the name of their website— The Artist’s Road —I smiled to myself because they got it so right! Art—painting, drawing, sculpting, all of it—is a path, a journey. Sometimes the path is smooth and things go right, and sometimes it is
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  • During a dinner conversation among artists last May at the National Arts Club, in New York City, Everett Raymond Kinstler was among the esteemed company, and he kept everyone engaged with his entertaining stories of artists past and present. When Kinstler speaks, everyone listens, as he has been a successful
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  • An ink drawing from an artist's journal. Art journals are a hot trend right now for mixed media artists, and one that I'm especially attuned to. I love art journals. They are akin to sketchbooks, but usually have a lot more finish to them--as
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  • Hi all! This is my first blog at Artist Daily, and I wanted to jump right in and discuss one of the best things I think a plein air painter can do—use a sketchbook to plan your composition and clarify your vision of the finished painting you have in mind.
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  • I interviewed Sadie Valeri on her unusual wax paper paintings months and months ago, but since then I've been keeping an eye on her. She's got great spirit, enviable talent, and she's just super nice! Little did I know that her sweet exterior
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  • Come to the Artist Daily Facebook page and find out! Congratulate the winning painter and 'Like' the Artist Daily page to stay in the loop with us!
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  • The Gowanus Ballroom brought together installation art, contemporary sculpture, and realist painting. Every once in a while, I get to do something that is comes uniquely from the place where I’ve chosen to live—Brooklyn. My studio is in Gowanus
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  • So many of us keep sketchbooks to make quick drawings, work through compositional possibilities, and just practice mark-making. An art journal is exactly what it sounds like, a bound book of artistry that can take all of your exploration to the next level. Many mixed media artists create art journals
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  • Artists create for a lot of reasons--ego, instinct, livelihood--but author and painter Margaret Krug creates for a very unique reason: to enfold us in the intimacy and delicacy of her personal artistic vision. Often working on a small scale, sometimes on a surface no larger than a postcard, Krug paints
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  • Summit by Odd Nerdrum, oil painting, 2000, 93 x 88. Odd Nerdrum: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Odd Nerdrum was born in Hälsingborg, Sweden, in 1944. He was a student at The Academy of Art in Oslo at the time when Modernism made its delayed
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  • Up the Block by Rose Frantzen, oil painting, 40 x 50. Rose Frantzen: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Rose Frantzen 's peers hold her in especially high regard as an artist's artist. In her 25 years as a full-time painter, she has also gained
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  • Lea Colie Wight: Weekend With the Masters Instructor "From time to time you notice something unexpectedly beautiful in the most ordinary person; the overlooked corner will tell the story of the people not present; something will tug at you and you
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  • Glass Study 3 by Stephen Early, oil painting on masonite, 7 x 5. Stephen Early: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Artist Stephen Early began his art education at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia. He has received many notable portrait
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  • The Den by Scott Waddell, oil painting, 20 x 16. Scott Waddell: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Scott Waddell was born and raised in Central Florida. He received his B.F.A. from Florida State University. After college, Waddell spent the next several
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  • Venus Pregnant by Steven Assael, oil painting, 72 x 48, 2002. Steven Assael: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Artist Steven Assael was born in New York City in 1957. He attended Pratt Institute and presently teaches at The School of Visual Arts, in
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  • Breton Wash Basin by Edward Minoff, oil painting. Edward Minoff: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Edward Minoff graduated with honors from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. Throughout his high-school and college years he studied painting
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  • Portrait of His Holiness, John Paul II by Nelson Shanks, 2001, oil painting on canvas, 54 x 50. Nelson Shanks: Weekend With the Masters Instructor One of the most sought after teachers and portrait painters in the world and founder of the post-graduate
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  • Persian Archer by Dan Thompson, 18 x 28, oil painting, 2004. Dan Thompson: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Dan Thompson was born in Alexandria, Virginia, and graduated from the Corcoran School of Art, in Washington, DC. He earned his M.F.A. from the
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  • Untitled by Daniel Sprick, 2006, 24 x 24, oil painting. Daniel Sprick: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Daniel Sprick was born in Little Rock, Arkansas. He studied at the Froman School of Art and The National Academy of Design and received his B.F
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  • Seascape by Ray Roberts, oil painting. Ray Roberts: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Ray Roberts is best known for his seascapes, figurative work, and majestic views of California and the Southwest, and is one of California's most respected plein
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  • Figure Throwing Ball by Rob Liberace, chalk drawing on paper, 24 x 36. Rob Liberace: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Robert Liberace is considered by many to be a contemporary classicist, equally accomplished in sculpture, drawing, and painting and
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  • The Love on the Road by Ron Hicks, oil painting. Ron Hicks: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Ron Hicks grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and was introduced to art at an early age under the influence of his artist mother. Continuing to pursue drawing through
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  • Seated Figure by Dan McCaw, 24 x 18, oil painting. Dan McCaw: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Dan McCaw was born in 1942 and raised in Montana and during his academic art career attended the Montana Institute of Technology, in Butte Montana; Academy
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  • Youth by David A. Leffel, oil painting, 15 x 13 1/2. David Leffel: Weekend With the Masters Instructor David A. Leffel is widely recognized as one of the most accomplished representational artists today and is often referred to as a living Old Master
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  • Pastel painter and oil painter Albert Handell. Albert Handell: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Pastelist and oil painter Albert Handell was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. At an early age, a favorite activity of his was drawing with chalks on
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  • Skylar in Blue by Jeremy Lipking, oil painting, 16 x 12, 2010. Jeremy Lipking: Weekend With the Masters Instructor In a remarkably short period of time, Jeremy Lipking has emerged as one of the country's premier oil painters. His talent, which rivals
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  • Red Carnations with Ming Rice Bowl by Jacqueline Kamin, oil painting, 20 x 16. Jacqueline Kamin: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born in 1950 in Washington, DC, Jacqueline Kamin received her formal art education from the Corcoran Museum School in
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  • Connecticut Yankee Spring by George Gallo, 20 x 24, oil painting. George Gallo: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Award-winning writer, director, and painter George Gallo is capturing the hearts of both the general public and artist-audiences everywhere
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  • Quang Ho at his easel. Quang Ho: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Quang Ho was born on April 30, 1963, in Hue, Vietnam. He immigrated to the United States in 1975 and is now a U.S. citizen. His artistic interest began at the early age of 3 and continued
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  • Spring Dance by Nancy Guzik, 12 x 20, oil painting. Nancy Guzik: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Throughout her career in art, Nancy Guzik has been quietly perfecting not only her skills but also the focus of her work. The result on the surface of
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  • Champs Elysees by John Salminen, watercolor painting. John Salminen: Weekend With the Masters Instructor John Salminen was born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota. He earned his bachelor's degree and master's degree from the University of Minnesota
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  • Serra Chapel by Timothy Clark, watercolor painting, 29 x 40, 2006. Timothy J. Clark: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Timothy J. Clark is a master watercolorist and oil painter whose work is included in the permanent collections of The Butler Institute
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  • Sublime Order by Daniel Pinkham, oil painting. Daniel Pinkham: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born in Los Angeles, Daniel Pinkham has been a principal force in the resurgence of plein air painting in California and throughout the country. Pinkham
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  • Approaching Noise (in progress) by David Jon Kassan, oil painting on wood panel, 40 x 34. David Jon Kassan: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Following his initial drawing studies at University of the Arts, in Philadelphia, David Jon Kassan attended
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  • Graffiti by Mary Whyte, watercolor painting. Mary Whyte: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born in Ohio in 1953, Mary Whyte grew up with all the rural Midwest has to offer. She graduated from Tyler School of Art, in Philadelphia, in 1976 with a Bachelor
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  • Twilight by Tony Ryder, 1998, pencil drawing, 25 x 19. Tony Ryder: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Anthony Ryder studied at the Art Students League of New York, the New York Academy of Art, and the Ecole Albert Defois, in France, with oil painter
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  • Scott Christensen working on a large oil canvas. Scott Christensen: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Given that Scott Christensen rarely picked up a brush until his college years, some would say he came to the canvas late indeed. Yet in a sense, art
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  • Maya with Guitar by Susan Lyon, oil painting, 12 x 9. Susan Lyon: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Susan Lyon studied painting at the American Academy of Art and the Palette & Chisel Academy of Fine Arts, both in Chicago. It is there she first
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  • Untitled by Robin Frey, oil painting, 14 x 14, 2008. Robin Frey: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Artist Robin Frey grew up in Sarasota, Florida, taking art classes as a child at the Ringling School of Art. She received her B.F.A. from Eastern Mennonite
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  • Morro Bay Rock, Near Cambria by C.W. Mundy, oil painting on linen, 16 x 20. C.W. Mundy: Weekend With the Masters Instructor C.W. Mundy, an American impressionist, was born in 1945 and raised in Indianapolis, Indiana. He graduated with a B.F.A. from Ball
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  • Dawn, High Tide-Navesink River by Skip Whitcomb, oil painting on linen, 10 x 20. Skip Whitcomb: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born in 1946, M.W. Skip Whitcomb has been interested in art since his childhood on a ranch near Sterling, Colorado. However
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  • A Wind to Ward Off Dreams by Jean-Pierre Roy, 58 x 68, oil painting, 2010. Jean-Pierre Roy: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Jean-Pierre Roy is an artist and teacher currently living and working in New York City. Born in Santa Monica in 1974, Roy pursued
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  • Crashing Waves at Three Arch Bay; Laguna Beach by Peter Adams , pastel painting, 12 x 16. Peter Adams: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Peter Adams was born in Los Angeles, California, on August 27, 1950 and he received his training in California at
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  • Santa Catalina Island by Kevin Macpherson, oil painting, 30 x 50. Kevin Macpherson: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Kevin Macpherson is one of the country's leading plein air painters and is highly respected among collectors and fellow artists
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  • February Shadows, Rio Grande by Stephen Quiller, acrylic painting, 17 x 19 1/2. Stephen Quiller: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Stephen Quiller is an internationally known painter who works primarily in water media, monotypes, and intaglio printmaking
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  • Throughout his career, Richard Schmid has promoted art education through his books, articles, workshops, seminars, and television presentations. Richard Schmid: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Richard Schmid was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1934.
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  • Stringbeans by Morgan Weistling, oil painting, 30 x 26. Morgan Weistling: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Well known for his paintings of early American pioneer life, Morgan Weistling began his art career as a movie-poster illustrator. While still
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  • Window II by Alyssa Monks, oil painting, 2011, 48 x 36. Alyssa Monks: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born 1977 in Ridgewood, New Jersey, Alyssa Monks began oil painting when she was just a child. Later, when she embarked on her academic career, she
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  • Winter Sun, Full Moon by Marcia Burtt , acrylic painting. Marcia Burtt: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Marcia Burtt graduated from University of California Berkeley with a major in psychology and earned an M.A. in art from the University of Montana
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  • Sunlit Birch by Frank Serrano, oil on canvas, 12 x 12. Frank Serrano: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Contemporary landscape artist and plein air painter Frank M. Serrano was born in Los Angeles on November 29, 1967. He developed an early interest
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  • Thinking Man by Jacob Collins, oil painting, 30 x 20, 2004. Jacob Collins: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Jacob Collins is a leading figure in the contemporary revival of classical painting. He earned a B.A. in history from Columbia College and attended
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  • Market Colors by Scott Burdick, oil on canvas. Scott Burdick: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Scott Burdick was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1967, where his mother and father encouraged his interest in art from an early age. "I spent a lot of
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  • Light at Sunset by Joseph McGurl, oil painting, 24 x 36. Joseph McGurl: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Joseph McGurl has been referred to as one of the acknowledged leaders in the current American landscape painting arena. This has been confirmed
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  • Handline Hook by Stephen Scott Young, watercolor painting, 2010, 10 1/2 x 19 1/2. Stephen Scott Young: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Stephen Scott Young grew up in St. Augustine, Florida, and studied at the Ringling College of Art and Design, in
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  • Vermont Farmhouse by Clayton Beck, oil painting. Clayton Beck: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Clayton J. Beck III studied at the American Academy of Art and the Palette & Chisel Academy of Fine Arts, in Chicago, and launched his career as a professional
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  • Self-Portrait by Daniel Graves, oil on canvas, 2007. Daniel Graves: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Daniel Graves , born in Rochester, New York in 1949, is an oil painter, etcher, and founder and director of The Florence Academy of Art, Florence,
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  • Dave by Carolyn Anderson, oil painting, 16 x 12. Carolyn Anderson: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Carolyn Anderson , a nationally recognized artist, is an accomplished pastelist and oil painter. Born and raised in the Chicago area, Anderson attended
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  • Vineyard Melody by Camille Przewodek, 16 x 20, oil on canvas. Camille Przewodek: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Camille Przewodek is a plein air colorist based in Petaluma, California, who received her B.F.A. in illustration from the Academy of Art
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  • Nouveau by Daniel Gerhartz , oil painting. Daniel Gerhartz: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Daniel F. Gerhartz was born in Wisconsin in 1965, where he now lives with his wife Jennifer and their four children. His interest in art piqued at an early
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  • Drawing of Taheera by Sherrie McGraw, 2009, charcoal, 24 x 18. Sherrie McGraw: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Sherrie McGraw has been at the forefront of the American art scene for more than 30 years. As a young woman in Oklahoma City in 1978, she
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  • Morning Light Crystal Cove , by Joe Paquet, oil painting on linen. Joseph Paquet: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Joseph Paquet received his Bachelors of Fine Art at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City, and had the good fortune of being mentored
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  • This is the third year that American Artist has partnered with Utrecht for their Third Annual Art Competition , and it looks like the prizes are the best yet. The grand prize winner receives a six-week scholarship to Studio Incamminati in Philadelphia
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  • The American Artist Weekend With the Masters events and art workshops are an opportunity to learn how to paint at the hands of some of the most inspiring, skilled oil painting artists, watercolorists, and draftsmen working today. Their artistic abilities
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  • John and Ann’s recent post about painting water en plein air was so inspiring and right on target. I love painting water elements, too, because they always make plein air landscape paintings more interesting. John and Ann’s tips were great, and I have two more to add:
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  • Wilson uses the visual world as a lexicon of poetic images, as in his painting, Mary . In the 19th century, painters depicted modern life, embracing the “real” and eschewing narrative subjects and symbolism. Now, modern figure painters are
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  • Gateway Drugs (detail) by Erin Riley. I'm always interested in seeing how artists use unusual materials to express themselves, which is why I always flip through my copy of our sister publication, Fiberarts Magazine , as soon as it hits my desk. Just
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  • Living as we do in the center of the country where the dominant feature of the landscape is the sky, we have always enjoyed painting the rich variety of clouds here. Besides being beautiful to look at, clouds can tell us all sorts of things about the weather, both present and future, that can prove very
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  • Here's John using his heavy-weight watercolor gear while painting in Colorado. Through trial and error, over the years, we have figured out how to pack for our foot-powered plein-air painting adventures. We like to keep our heavy-duty Eagle Creek
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  • Bonita Williams Goldberg (her painting, Not Over Yet , above), is known as a Georgia Peach. She routinely sends new clients to her representatives, and she rotates consistently beautiful works in and out of her galleries. Artists love to gossip about
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  • Scott Burdick and Susan Lyon are skilled artists, inspiring instructors, and just really kind people. If you've ever been in a workshop with either of them, you are lucky enough to know what I mean. In watching them work, you get a sense of the sensitivity and thoughtfulness with which they craft
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  • Sometimes in making a small study for a larger oil painting, an artist will sketch in certain areas very loosely. It's almost as if she says to herself, "and there's some other stuff that fills in this area of the composition, but I'll think about that later." With the set of small
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  • Let's say you're Egon Schiele. You have a singular vision so original, so violently intense, that you can develop as an artist by feeding exclusively on your own inspiration. Your drive will crush every obstacle in your way--even feed on it, transforming your mistakes and flaws into revelations
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  • Study for Leaves of Grass . All works by Patricia Watwood. With the image of a female figure reading in the summer grass in mind, I began to develop my oil painting , Leaves of Grass . I started with a preparatory drawing. I work with models and from
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  • I've been waiting all my life to have a red-carpet moment, but who knows when the Academy will get around to remembering my searing director's debut at the age of 14, when I put on a musical version of Hamlet to the theme song of The Beatles' "Obladi Oblada." (Maybe you had to be
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  • Measure First, Draw Second; The Pathway to Great Compositions; Make Every ?Brushstroke Count; Learn How Top Artists Paint; How the Academic Technique can Work for You
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  • With a deadline looming for a May group show of flowers and gardens, this past Saturday seemed an ideal time for me to create something for the exhibit during my first plein-air painting session of the season! Daffodils are already blooming everywhere, and the weather was perfect for a day of painting
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  • Point Lobos , oil, 12 x 16. All works by Matt Smith . Have you ever had a moment where you’ve stumbled on something unexpected and you think to yourself, “What a find!” That was so me a few days ago. I read an amazing Q&A that one
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  • My Superfine Studio Solution Competition is going on now! What solution--and no solution is too great or too small--have you come up with lately in your painting or drawing practice that has made your process easier? We want to know and reward you for
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  • Water is perhaps one of the more challenging subjects to paint convincingly in a plein air landscape painting. Whether one is inspired by the ocean, a river, or a pond or lake, each subject requires a studied familiarity and often distinctly different paint handling. Here are a just a few tips that we
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  • Hi Artist Daily, Lately I've realized there are so many interesting, water cooler-worthy art happenings that I want to share with you that don't necessarily make it up on the blogs here on Artist Daily. Like today I just found out that one of
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  • Hi All, We've set up a forum devoted to Weekend with the Masters events. You can exchange information with other attendees, find each other before and after the events, swap ideas on lodging, and get the latest news from the events team planning all
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  • In my first post on building healthy relationships with galleries, I explained that the top-selling couple of artists in any gallery are usually the same few who get heavily promoted as individuals by name. The rest of the gallery's stable of artists typically get promoted as a group, as part of
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  • Margaret Krug, painter, writer for American Artist , and author of An Artist Handbook: Materials and Techniques, is teaching a one-of-a-kind program, Painting on Panels , from August 12-26 in Spannocchia, Italy. The scope of the workshop is traditional
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  • Leah , oil on canvas, 2010, 24 x 20. The Sicilian Expedition , oil on canvas, 2010, 60 x 40. They say that there are two kinds of painter: color painters, and the other kind--the kind that focuses on form, tone, and line. I'm that "other"
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  • Slicker by Mary Whyte, 2010, watercolor. Watercolor magazine and the Burchfield Penney Art Center in Buffalo, New York have come together for a very special event: WaterMedia Weekend 2011 . It is the opportunity for total immersion in the medium you love
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  • Come to the Artist Daily Facebook page and find out! Congratulate the winning painter and if you haven't already done so,'Like' us to show your support!
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  • As plein air artists, we have had to become very aware of our own visual filtering processes--our visual biases. We train ourselves to focus our eyes and our minds on the subject before us, but it is only when we can quiet the mind from labeling and judging what we see that we are ever able to truly
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  • 10 Keys To Making Accurate Judgments; Use Measurements & Simple Shapes for Better Portraits; Learn Variations of Impressionist Painting; 4 Stages Of Successful Plein Air Paintings
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  • For a while now, I have been exploring narrative themes. This is what R. H. Ives Gammell called “poetical pictures.” In the 19th century, this was commonly referred to as “history painting”, but by history they did not just mean world events as we define the term. “Poetical
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  • Why do so many artists seem to have a love-hate relationship with art galleries? On the one hand, galleries are still one of the most prestigious and effective means of selling art, but on the other, artists often trash talk many aspects of the gallery system. Thanks to my recent work in a great gallery
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  • David A. Leffel painted this self-portrait in the style of Rembrandt, one of history’s greatest portraitists. Collection Nancy Greenawalt. What fascinates me about the artists I admire most is their drive, determination, and commitment to become
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  • Study for Pandora , oil on canvas, 2010. All works by Patricia Watwood. For the past six months, I have been working away at a new series of figure paintings. Over the next weeks and months, I will tell you more about each of them, and the steps involved
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  • When we start making art, we don't start from a position of, "I want to paint like so-and-so," or not even, necessarily, "I want to paint well." We should start from a position of, "I have a need to make art." This is an important principle; it gives us the strength
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  • I'm happy to announce our Superfine Studio Solution Competition has begun! Basically, we at American Artist and Artist Daily want to reward you for being a "creative type" by telling us how you've made your studio work for you. No two are built alike and every studio space comes with
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  • Turn Mistakes into Masterpieces; create the element of surprise with acrylics; get creative with Sunlight and Shadow; use value studies To Save Time; go inside Workshops With the Pros
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  • This month's Artist Daily Facebook Painting of the Month caught my eye immediately when I was looking through the posts on the Member's Gallery. The water in Shamrock Lake, MN , is as smooth as glass, and water itself seems to be half cloud or
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  • I like pastel for winter work because of the ease of not having to deal with paint thinner, stiff paint, or mixing color on a palette. When winter graces us with her charms and everywhere you look is covered in a beautiful layer of snow, Ann and I get
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  • Learn more about Mary Whyte’s full-length DVD. I'm a reader and studier by nature, but the lessons and techniques that I learn from books and magazines always seem to click much quicker when I watch an artist paint, rather than try to puzzle
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  • Waiting for Supper , 18” x 35”, oil on canvas, 2010. All works by Patricia Watwood . Hello! I am delighted to begin this new venture with Artist Daily and start an ongoing conversation about my painting process and my thoughts on art. Most
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  • Last year's American Artist Cover Competition winning painting on the July/August issue. After poring over thousands of paintings and drawings that you submitted, Artist Daily is proud to announce the winners of this year’s American Artist Cover
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  • Tracks II by John Hulsey, pastel. With the high-contrast conditions of winter sun on brilliant snow, we have been exploring the colors of snow and shadows in our plein air paintings. Shadows are essential because they create the form and interest in a
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  • The Lonely Man by Clark Hulings Last week, we received some surprising and very sad news in the American Artist office. The widely-admired landscape painter Clark Hulings had passed away at the age of 88. We learned this less than a day after finishing
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  • It's always with a bit of anxiety that I do a pencil drawing. I want the form to look as if the paper doesn't exist--as if the image is coming right off the page, and that is a challenging task. I caught Scott Waddell's second installment
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  • Fire and Ice by John Hulsey, watercolor. We both love painting landscapes outside, especially in the winter, when the air is clear and the landscape is reduced to its architectural purity. But winter weather conditions are rarely moderate in the places
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  • 14 Top Instructors Share Their Secrets; How to Paint From Photographs; Complete Instruction in Painting Figures, Still Lifes & Landscapes; 12 Step-by-Step Demonstrations & Lists of Materials Check out what's featured in the Fall 2009 issue of American Artist Highlights.
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  • Check out the Artist Daily Facebook page to see our February painting of the month, chosen from the Member's Gallery.
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  • Imagine breaking down even the most complex painting into just a handful of shapes. Painter Ron Hicks has found that the process of painting a portrait can be intimidating, if not overwhelming, to even the most practiced painters because a lot of detail is often confused with what makes a successful
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  • Trying to capture the likeness of a person in a finite period of time and meeting the high expectations often associated with portraiture are far from effortless tasks. They take commitment and savvy to do well. Our eBook Oil Painting Lessons on How to Paint a Portrait: 15 Portrait Painting Techniques
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  • Use a Limited Pallette for Greater Benefits; 10 Concrete Solutions for Figure Painting; How to Accurately See the Color Light; Andrea J. Smith; Bryan Mark Taylor; Steve Huston; Clayton J Beck III.
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  • Study by Will Pierce, Maryland Institute, College of Art. I'm always eager to see what young artists are painting or drawing—what's capturing the attention of college art students and occupying their creativity. It is a way to discover how
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  • Margaret Krug is a skilled, compelling artist and instructor, and author of An Artist's Handbook: Materials and Techniques . This year she is taking a small group of students on an drawing odyssey of sorts, traveling to Spannocchia in central Italy
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  • 50 Products Guaranteed to Improve Safety & Storage in Your Studio; 6 Historic Studios You Can Visit; Big Solutions for Small Spaces; Clever Ideas for Adapting a Bedroom, Garage, or Unused Space
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  • I had the pleasure of meeting artist Christopher Pugliese recently, and thumbed through the catalog—hot off the presses—that will soon be out to accompany his solo museum show at the New Britain Museum of American Art . The exhibition, New/Now: Christopher Pugliese Paintings and Drawings
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  • The RayMar Art annual fine art competition is in its fifth year and has become a premier juried exhibition and contest in the art community. It is RayMar Art's way of simultaneously recognizing exceptional artwork and supporting working artists with substantial cash prizes.
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  • We received hundreds of strong, compelling entries for the American Artist , Watercolor , and Drawing 2011 Cover Competitions. The American Artist editors have determined the winning pieces of art, and all finalists have been notified. The list of winners
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  • Crescent Framing came to Artist Daily and asked us to post a link to the survey they are promoting about custom framing. I just did it and it took me about 10 minutes, but then I put in comments wherever it was an option—I can't help myself
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  • Sunlight by Carol Carter, watercolor, 22 x 30. Mark Mehaffey, Nicholas Simmons, Keiko Tanabe, Carol Carter, Thomas W. Schaller, and Kathleen Alexander have formed the North American Watercolor Artists, a group of six U.S. watercolor artists, to represent
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  • This is the time of year when I like to take on something new. Summer is over and I want a fun goal on my horizon. Last year I trained with one of my best friends for a half-marathon. This year, it is the Artist Daily All Media Photo C