Drawing Faces

How to Draw Faces

. How to draw anatomy.

Learn how to draw faces with
Artists Network's free tutorial.

Capturing a person’s appearance in a drawing is a three-fold task. On one hand, an artist needs to understand the anatomy of the head and how it is positioned on the neck and in relation to the rest of the body. You must also be able to effectively render the features of the face, knowing how to draw eyes, nose, lips, and hair so that all these parts integrate into the whole. But artists also need to realize that drawing faces isn’t an exercise in minutiae. It is more a matter of accurately rendering a handful of facial planes, shapes, and proportions that distinguish each one of us.

This topic page will guide you towards links, resources and youtube tutorials to help you on your way to mastering drawing faces.

Face drawing techniques

Realistic face drawing begins with understanding the shape of the human head.
.

Drawing eyes
Eyes are almost always halfway down the oval shape that is the human head. It is easy to forget this and place them too high up, forgetting to account for a forehead and a hairline, which takes up most of the top half of a person's head.

Drawing lips
By learning the musculature of the face, you'll be able to better understand how to draw lips because you see them in the context of the human anatomy. This is especially important if you draw without a life or photographic reference, since many facial expressions involuntarily cause the lips to change ever so slightly.

Drawing noses
It's crucial to get a person's nose right, since everything else on a face radiates out from it. This should be one of the last portions of the face you add, as it requires time and attention unlike any other aspect of drawing a face. While every face is different, there are some simple tricks: the eye is usually about the same width as the nose, and the edges of the nose usually line up with the eye's inner corner.

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Don't be caught making common mistakes.
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Common face drawing mistakes
There are many small adjustments you can make to improve your face drawings, if you know what the common mistakes are. These include: misplacing the ear, shrinking the skull, drawing the nose and eyes out of proportion with each other, getting the angle between the forehead and nose wrong, and forgetting to register the thickness of the eyelid.

Another common misstep is putting too much effort into colour and tone, and not enough into drawing facial proportions.


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  • We're pretty passionate about drawing at the magazine, so it's nice to come across other people who are as dedicated to draftsmanship and expressive drawing as we are. The folks at the Drawing Day project certainly fall into this category. For the second year, Mick Gow and his staff are urging
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  • It's always a good time to visit The Frick, especially this summer, when people in New York will get a chance to see the exhibition "Portraits, Pastels, Prints: Whistler in The Frick Collection," a gathering of the museum's Whistlers, spanning three media.
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  • "Bodies ... The Exhibition," currently housed in New York City's South Street Seaport, offers draftsmen the chance to draw from human specimens after hours. It's an opportunity New York City area artists shouldn't miss.
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  • Here are a few basic concepts of artistic perspective you absolutely need to know, whether your intentions are expressive or realist-minded.
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  • Sure, we have our favorites, even if we aren't supposed to. Here are 10 of the best articles published in Drawing magazine over the last seven years, in no particular order.
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  • We surf the web for interesting new drawings and random information on art so you don't have to. April 28 edition.
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  • One reason people pursue pencil drawing is that they like the drama and look of black-and-white images. Drawing magazine is a great place to see the best of what artists working in black and white are doing. Two examples are within...
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  • What facial feature do you find to be the best indicator of a sitter's likeness?
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  • A look at the Bargue plates, a series of 197 lithographs that guide an art student through an increasingly difficult course of study.
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  • The doom-and-gloom talk prompted by the recession has squashed sales in galleries. So why was the recent opening of a young realist's show such a success?
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  • We surf the web for interesting new drawings and random information on art so you don't have to. March 24 edition:
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  • In this passage, which we had to cut from the print article in our Spring 2009 issue of Drawing for space reasons, artist-instructor Dan Gheno explains how visualizing the arc that body parts move through will help you place the joints in the right location, ensuring proper proportions.
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  • What inspired you to first pick up a pencil? For some it was first seeing an Audubon print. Others may have fallen in love with the anime film Akira. Maybe it was Superman.
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  • In this passage, which we had to cut from the print article in our Spring 2009 issue of Drawing for space reasons, artist-instructor Dan Gheno explains how the tanned portions of a nude model seem to stand out and push forward, and he reiterates the value of studying individual body parts.
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  • Q : I've been mostly a casual drawer, so I’ve stuck mainly to drawing the human figure. Now that I'm looking into pursuing a career in art, I need to improve my skills in sketching backgrounds. Is there a good online tutorial or a book that
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  • Here's a sneak preview of an upcoming feature in Drawing magazine: the lively, colorful figure drawings of NYC artist Fred Hatt.
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  • We've all seen Leonardo da Vinci's famous drawing The Vitruvian Man. But have you read the text he wrote to accompany it? Artist and scholar Anthony Panzera presents Morris Hicky Morgan's translation of Leonardo's notes on the diagram on human proportion, along with his Panzera's
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  • Pietro Annigoni was a great draftsman, portraitist, and teacher. We haven't been able to put a feature article together on him, but here are a few examples of this inspirational artist's work, and a bit of biographical information as well. Who else do you think has been needlessly neglected in
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  • Michael Graves may be best known now for designing household items and iconic buildings, but he has roots in traditional rendering, as a 2007 book featuring architectural renderings from a 1960 sketchbook shows.
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  • Many pastelists consider their pieces to be paintings. Here at American Artist, we have tried to steer clear of the debate on whether pastel is a drawing medium or a painting medium, although when put against the wall and poked in the chest, we'll
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  • B&W #6 , 2000, oil drawing on paper, 12" x 9" by Lisa Dinhofer An artist I interviewed recently, Lisa Dinhofer, said that being a good draftsman isn't enough. She said putting the emphasis on the objects in your scene is risky if it
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  • This time of year puts the focus on family, and at the center of the family is the special relationship between mother and child. Thanks in part to the powerful patronage of the Roman Catholic Church, there are thousands of pencil sketches and preparatory
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  • Michael Mentler's pencil drawings from his sketchbook. David Jon Kassan, a friend and an excellent painter and draftsman here in NYC, recently sent me these words about an artist he met during his travels. Here are some images from the artist's
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  • Above, a selection of sketchbooks from Kunst & Papier, Palo Alto, California. About two weeks ago I opened up a discussion regarding the best pencil for drawing. Now I'm interested in the best sketchbook. Although I had an opinion about the best
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  • A friend recently asked how to get into a routine of drawing, and I shared with her my methods of finding the time in a busy schedule to keep progressing in my pursuit of better draftsmanship. I draw from a live model one night a week; when my schedule
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  • Recently, two new drawing books caught my eye. I hope to review one or both in an upcoming issue of Drawing , but for those of you who need holiday gift ideas for the draftsman on your list RIGHT NOW, here's a sneak preview. Understanding Architecture
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  • Occhuzzie Paint Company, a small manufacturer based in Charlotte, North Carolina, unveiled two new pigments at the Savannah College of Art & Design's Art Materials Show, held at the beginning of October. One featured ground graphite suspended
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  • During the course of my work with Drawing magazine, I occasionally get to visit with Anthony Panzera, an excellent draftsman and teacher at Hunter College, on New York's Upper East Side. He is a man of dignity and warmth, and I enjoy chatting with
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  • The Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco’s Legion of Honor hosted this exhibition of work by master artist Leonardo da Vinci. Figural Sketches by Leonardo da Vinci ca. 1505, pen and black ink drawing with traces of black chalk on paper. Collection
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  • Learn to draw the cube and you have a good introduction to basic perspective and drawing essentials , plus the cube is one of the geometric building blocks of all objects—including the human figure. The Three Graces by Jon deMartin, 2002, burnt
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  • I'm excited that we've started a new series in Drawing magazine around drawing basics , authored by noted artist Jon deMartin. We'd been puzzling for some time on how to offer more basic instruction to beginners while simultaneously making
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  • Drawing is arguably the oldest form of visual art, but despite its long history, it still has the power to surprise. For example, the simple graphite pencil has been around for more than 200 years, but artists continue to find new methods of working with
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  • We chose 10 finalists for our Drawing Magazine Cover Competition—and then easily named William Rose the winner, as he best showcased the skill level and imagination of our readers. View the winners of the Watercolor magazine 2008 cover competiton
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  • During a recent plein air workshop in Southern France, Judith Carducci helped students who worked with pen-and-ink, pastel, watercolor, and oil colors. The unifying themes of the 10-day class were that drawing basics are a foundation of all media and
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  • Anthony Panzera comments on Antonio López García's Portrait of Maria . by Anthony Panzera Portrait of Maria by Antonio López García, 1972, graphite drawing, 28 x 21. Collection the artist. I first saw this drawing some
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  • An exhibition at The J. Paul Getty Museum, in Los Angeles, explores the way various master draftsmen used drawing to comment on society, often revealing their inner thoughts in the process. Caricature of a Man With Bushy Hair by Leonardo da Vinci, ca
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  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City, marked the renovation and reopening of the Robert Lehman Wing with an exhibition of 60 drawings by Venetian master Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and his son, Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo. Tiepolo Drawings From
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  • Anthony Panzera comments on Leonardo da Vinci's Head of the Virgin in Three-Quarter View Facing to the Right. by Anthony Panzera Head of the Virgin in Three-Quarter View Facing to the Right by Leonardo da Vinci, ca. 1510, soft black and red chalk
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  • In the summer 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how Omaha artist Kent Bellows was a masterful draftsman who took the time to contemplate a vision and complete works that would endure past his untimely death. We offer more examples of his pencil
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Sam Ivie's Cellini Revisited. Cellini Revisited by Sam Ivie, 2000, colored pencil drawing, 8 x 10. Collection the artist. Looking at Drawings: Cellini Revisited by Sam Ivie by David Jon Kassan In this small colored pencil
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Robert C. Dacey's Andrea in Shadow. Andrea in Shadow by Robert C. Dacey, charcoal drawing on Bristol board, 20 x 30. by David Jon Kassan This piece is a great figure drawing study in light and dark contrasts. It has a
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  • Anthony Panzera comments on William-Adolphe Bouguereau's A Girl in Peasant Costume, Seated, Arms Folded, Holding a Ball of Wool and Knitting Needles in her Right Hand. A Girl in Peasant Costume, Seated, Arms Folded, Holding a Ball of Wool and Knitting
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  • David Kassan comments on Katherine Sammons' My Mother . My Mother by Katherine Sammons, 2007, charcoal drawing, 14 x 18. by David Jon Kassan This piece is both a portrait of the artist's mother and a metaphor for the balance of opposites--light
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  • David Kassan comments on Kitty Teerling's Louisa and Connie. Connie by Kitty Teerling, 2007, pencil drawing, 4½ x 5½. Louisa by Kitty Teerling, 2007, pencil drawing, 4 x 5. by David Jon Kassan These portrait drawings by Kitty Teerling
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  • Owen Gray comments on Peter Paul Rubens' Hercules and Minerva Fighting Mars. Hercules and Minerva Fighting Mars by Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1632-1640, gouache and brush over brown ink over preliminary drawing in black chalk on light brown paper, 14
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Burton Silverman's drawing, Demonstrator. Demonstrator by Burton Silverman, 1968, charcoal drawing. by David Jon Kassan This charcoal drawing by Burton Silverman represents one of the many conceptual approaches the artist
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  • Ephraim Rubenstein discusses Michelangelo's The Risen Christ and The Resurrection of Christ. by Ephraim Rubenstein The Risen Christ by Michelangelo, ca. 1513, black chalk drawing, 16 x 10. Collection the British Museum, London, England. The Resurrection
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  • Ohio artist J. Todd Anderson took his talent for drawing to Hollywood and, as a storyboard artist, became part of the award-winning Coen Brothers movie-making team, creating the storyboards for such movies as Raising Arizona and No Country for Old Men
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  • About 25% of the human body's bones are in the foot, a vitally important structure for a biped. Here's a drawing tutorial about what draftsmen need to know to draw the foot and depict its function convincingly. by David Jon Kassan Bone Outstep
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  • Read the transcript from yesterday's live online chat and drawing tutorial with colored pencil artist Arlene Steinberg. Be sure to attend our next live chat with pastel artist Janet Monafo on Monday, June 9 at 2pm EST. 2008-05-12 11:00:03.0 Administrator
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  • In her colored pencil and graphite drawings, Dee Overly invites viewers to admire the unique details of natural objects. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Raindrops 2007, colored pencil drawing, 8½ x 7. This piece won second place in American Artist’s
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  • Here are some ways to give depth to your drawings. by Bob Bahr A Grove of Pine Trees With a Ruined Tower by Claude Lorrain, 1638â??1639, pen and brown ink with brown, gray, and pink wash on white paper, 12â? x 8¾. Collection
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Käthe Kollwitz's Self-Portrait. Self-Portrait By Käthe Kollwitz, 1924, lithograph drawing. by David Jon Kassan This drawing exemplifies the term that less is more. This is a straightforward, austere pencil sketch
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Michelangelo's Male Nude . Male Nude by Michelangelo Buonarroti, ca.1504, black chalk drawing heightened with lead white, 16 x 9. Collection Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands. Looking at Drawings: "Male Nude
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Nicolai Fechin's Manuelita. Manuelita by Nicolai Fechin, ca. 1930, charcoal drawing on off-white paper. by David Jon Kassan This drawing by Nicolai Fechin likely served as a study for a painting and is a great observation
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  • Careful use of darks and lights within and around the figure can give your drawings more power and dramatic force. by Dan Gheno Laocoön by Baccio Bandinelli, red and black chalk, 21 x 15¾. Collection the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy. Some
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  • Arlene Steinberg develops her detailed colored pencil drawings in much the same way as an oil painter would proceed. She carefully determines a composition, builds from dark shadows to bright highlights, and underpaints complementary colors to enrich
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Costa Vavagiakis' Connie XXI . Connie XXI by Costa Vavagiakis, 2005, graphite and white chalk drawing on gray paper, 16½ x 11½. by David Jon Kassan This drawing by Costa Vavagiakis was done with graphite heightened
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses Jean-Baptist Greuze's Study of the Head of an Old Man. Study of the Head of an Old Man by Jean-Baptiste Greuze, ca. 1765, red chalk, 15? x 12?. Collection J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California. Looking at Drawings
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  • In the spring 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we explored how the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts puts students on the path to become artists, teaching them drawing basics and then taking them beyond. In this online exclusive gallery, we offer more
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  • In the spring 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how Maine artist Janvier Rollande found that a bit of herself always came through in her pencil drawings of others. We offer more of her graphite portraits in this online exclusive gallery. Tapestry
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  • In this online exclusive, read more about the history of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts as a supplement to the spring 2008 Drawing magazine feature article. by Tina Tammaro In 1791 artist Charles Willson Peale began to gather a group of prominent
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  • In this online exclusive gallery, we offer more colored pencil drawings by spring 2008 featured artist Dee Overly. Hiding 2006, colored pencil, 7 x 6. Collection Cathy Barry. Rain Beads 2007, colored pencil, 8½ x 7. Collection the artist. Peaches
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on George Bellows' A Stag at Sharkey's. A Stag at Sharkey’s by George Bellows, 1917, lithograph, 18½ x 23. This lithograph drawing by George Bellows was based on an earlier painting of the same name done
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  • Because most of his Pennsylvania landscapes begin with his photographs, Peter Fiore considers his paintings reorchestrations of reality. “A painting is what I envision,” he says, “not necessarily what nature gave me.” by Linda
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  • A look at the anatomical structure of the neck, and some helpful figure drawing tips from Drawing magazine's Understanding Anatomy series. Read other features in the Understanding Anatomy series: Drawing the Leg Drawing the Ear Drawing the Arm by
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  • For almost 20 years, Jimmy Sanders has set specific goals for his art education, the types of paintings he creates, and the projects he undertakes. “Goals are dreams with deadlines,” he says. “They are important to realist painters who
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  • In the May 2008 issue of American Artist, we explored how Arlene Steinberg developed her detailed colored pencil drawings in much the same way as an oil painter would proceed. We present more of her drawings in this online exclusive gallery. All Paired
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  • David Jon Kassan discusses John Singer Sargent's Male Back . Male Back by John Singer Sargent, charcoal drawing. Drawn between 1890-1915. by David Jon Kassan While most artists will rely on how light describes form in their figure drawings , John
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  • Twenty-five architectural drawings created by Richard Morris Hunt between 1847 and 1863 were on display at the National Academy Museum . Hunt, often referred to as "the dean of American architecture," was the first American to study architecture
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  • An artist's handling of edges is one of the drawing basics and of great importance if a drawing is to be convincing. Tartar Huntsman by Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1616, black chalk heightened with white, 15 1/16 x 10 9/16. Collection The Fizwilliam Museum
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  • In this online exclusive gallery, view more examples of Philip Pearlstein's work that highlight the draftsmanship and drawing skills described in his winter 2008 Drawing feature. Jerusalem, Kidron Valley 1987-88, woodcut, 40 x 119. Collection the
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  • David Jon Kassan comments on Dan Thompson's Study for Mirror (I against I) . Study for Mirror (I Against I) by Dan Thompson, graphite. Collection unknown. This served as a study for a self-portrait. Looking at Drawings: "Study for Mirror (I Against
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  • This New York artist discovers many of his breakthroughs through drawings, depicting strictly what he sees with little thought for accepted standards of draftsmanship. by John A. Parks Study for Eroded Cliff 1955, sepia wash on paper, 18¾ x 23
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  • Throughout his long career, Henry Casselli has looked to drawings to clarify his impressions and better understand his subject. To read more features like this, subscribe to Drawing today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli Study for Sparring Partner 2005, graphite
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how Anthony Mitri and Mary Reilly, who work in charcoal and graphite respectively, mastered the drawing essentials to develop a personal vision and unique style through their drawings of New York
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  • by John Rutherford Exhausted Surgeon 2002, Conté and acrylic, 17 x 21. All artwork this article collection the artist. My approach to figure drawing allows me to work quickly in establishing both the linear outlines of the model’s form and
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  • The pencil manufacturer Caran d’Ache agreed to share their pencil-making process with Drawing readers through the following photographs, so that artists are informed about their materials and can use them when solidifying their mastery of all drawing
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  • For this new feature, we've asked artists to comment on some of their favorite drawings. In this first edition, David Jon Kassan comments on Head Study of a Young Girl by John H. VanderPoel. Head Study of a Young Girl by John H. VanderPoel, 1903,
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we discussed how New York City artist Julia Randall's colored pencil drawings incorporated depictions of her mouth. We present more of her voyeuristic, suggestive, slightly grotesque, and humorous drawings
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  • This French master teaches us much about contours, portraiture, and how to draw people. by Mark G. Mitchell Portrait of Charles- François Mallet 1809, graphite, 10 9/16 x 8 5/16. Collection The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. So that’s
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  • Water-soluble colored pencils offer the perfect solution for artists who want to create watercolor effects without the hassle of watercolor paints. by Stephanie Kaplan Plumeria 2006, watercolor pencil, 8 x 10. Watercolorist Kristy Ann Kutch owned a set
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  • In the winter 2008 issue of Drawing magazine, we explored how Henry Casselli has looked to drawings to clarify his impressions and better understand his subject throughout his long career. Here, we offer more of his portrait drawings in this online exclusive
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  • A more finished drawing is possible when a model poses for an extended amount of time, but this luxury comes with particular challenges. Identifying and preparing for the potential pitfalls will improve your figure drawing . To read more features like
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  • In the fall 2007 issue of Drawing magazine, we highlighted the Bay Area Classical Artist Atelier as one of the most regarded classical contemporary schools in the country, offering students traditional figure-drawing training from today’s top artist
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  • This web-based art program seeks to explore drawing basics as essential modes of education not only in the United Kingdom but all over the world. July 22, 2007, Sunset in Verona at Ponte by Victor Timofeev, 2007, pen-and-ink and graphite, 9½ x
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  • Many great landscape drawings were created as preparatory studies, educational exercises, or informational journals and not as finished works of art. We can now study those freely made graphic images for evidence of the drawing essentials , ideas, and
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  • by Bob Bahr Head of the Virgin in Three-Quarter View Facing to the Right by Leonardo da Vinci, 1508–1512, black and red chalk on paper, 8 x 6?. Collection The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York. Leonardo filled the sheet with the subject’s
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  • In the June 2007 issue of American Artist, we discussed how the large charcoal drawings that Montana artist David C. Powers creates on toned pano Artistico hot-pressed watercolor paper are inspired by the feelings of danger, freedom, solitude, and the
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  • John P. Smolko won the Grand Prize—a new MetroShed, furnished by Blick Art Materials, for use as a stand-alone studio—for his imaginative colored pencil piece, Homage to Klimt (The Virgin). Read more about the artist, and view five online
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  • We present the semifinalists in the drawing category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Study for the Portrait of Autumn by Chusit Wijarnjoragij, 2007, brown and white colored pencil, 25 x 19. First Place: Chusit Wijarnjoragij For Thailand-born Chusit Wijarnjoragij
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  • We present the semifinalists in the watercolor category. by Karen Stanger Johnston After the Harvest by Gail M. Wheaton, 2003, watercolor, 30 x 22. Collection Evan and Patricia Harter. First Place: Gail M. Wheaton Arizona artist Gail M. Wheaton completed
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  • We present the semifinalists in the colored pencil category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Ya Reckin by Rosemarie Rush, 2006, colored pencil, 16 x 20. First Place: Rosemarie Rush Like most of the images of Western life by California artist Rosemarie Rush
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  • We present the semifinalists in the printmaking category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Eulogy for Kreischerville by Bill Murphy, 2006, etching, 11 x 21. Image courtesy The Old Print Shop, New York, New York. Collection Newark Public Library, Newark, New
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  • Chicago’s School of Representational Art offers a classical art education in a modern world. by Mark G. Mitchell Tartan by Steve Ohlrich, 1999, charcoal and pastel on white paper, 25 x 19. On the top floor of an old factory warehouse in the arts
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  • Faintly draw construction lines to remind yourself of the parts of the form you don't see. by Bob Bahr Contour of a Woman Relaxing by Alex Zwarenstein, 2002, graphite, 20 x 30. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise indicated
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  • A look at the anatomical structure of the ear, and some helpful tips on how to draw people . by Ephraim Rubenstein Maddie 2005, pastel on sanded board, 19 x 15. In this portrait of my daughter, Madeleine, her ear is lit very dramatically from behind.
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  • The artists of the Ashcan School, known for their raw depictions of urban life, shared a background in newspaper and magazine illustration that shaped their drawing and painting styles. by Edith Zimmerman Far From the Fresh Air Farm by William Glackens
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  • by Bob Bahr Here are the basic art materials drawing. Drawing Graphite pencils A graphite pencil usually consists of a long, thin cylinder of graphite enclosed in a hexagonal wooden sleeve--the standard pencil. But solid graphite is also available in
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  • Screenprints can have subtle colors and edges, but the most stimulating examples are bold and crisp, as a selection from the Print Research Foundation, in Stamford, Connecticut, shows. by Bob Bahr The Hitchhiker by Robert Gwathmey, 1937–1943, screenprint
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  • Read the transcript from our online chat with top artist-instructor Dan Gheno. If you have more thoughts to share, chat with your peers on Artists' Forum , and check back for more online chats with featured artists. This chat was brought to you by
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  • Teachers of all grade levels and subjects can use museum resources to enhance their curriculum. by Erica Yonks African Mask 2006, 10th grade, charcoal and pencil. During a unit on the art and history of West Africa, students drew from figure sculptures
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  • This valuable lesson plan explains how to teach high-school students to draw landscapes. by Erica Yonks Green Trees 9th grade student, 2006, colored pencil. Grade Level: 9 Duration: three days Objectives • To depict landscapes with the illusion of
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  • We offered words of advice about drawing basics from Brian Bomeisler in the winter 2007 issue of Drawing magazine. Here, we present his five global skills of realistic drawing. Bomeisler helped a student correct and adjust the proportions of his self
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  • California artist Alyona Nickelsen uses odorless mineral spirits to dissolve some of the pigment in her colored pencil drawings, eliminating the pencil strokes and creating rich, luminous color. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Sincerely Yours 2006, colored pencil
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  • Read the transcript from our online chat with colored pencil artist Alyona Nickelsen. This chat was brought to you by Legion Paper . 2007-03-08 11:00:27.0 Administrator: You have joined a chat with Alyona Nickelsen, a colored pencil artist featured in
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  • As a supplement to our feature in the winter 2007 issue of Drawing magazine, we offer a more in depth look at Brian Bomeisler's drawing workshop with an extended version of the article, additional images of student work, and more photographs of the
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  • Cast Study—Laocoon 2005, charcoal and white chalk, 26 x 19. Collection the artist. Students attending contemporary art schools modeled after 19th-century academies often spend their first months on the drawing basics and making sight-size copies
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  • In past issues, we explained how to analyze and correctly draw different areas of the body. In this tutorial overview of the figure, we bring it all together. by Dan Gheno Weighted Stasis by Dan Gheno, 2006, colored pencil and white charcoal on toned
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  • If you know the anatomy of arms, you can use them to express much. by Ephraim Rubenstein Study of Arms 2006, red chalk, 26 x 19. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise indicated. This study shows the major masses of the arm in
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  • In the March 2007 issue of American Artist , Utah artist Brad Teare used a number of techniques to give his woodcut prints a fluid, organic quality that brings them closer in appearance to his plein air oil paintings . Here, we offer more the prints he
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  • by Edith Zimmerman From Hart’s Cartooning series (Watson-Guptill Publications, New York, New York). Anyone interested in the techniques of cartooning has probably heard of Christopher Hart . His instructional books have been read and reread by millions
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  • Depicting features is only the beginning. Putting life into a head drawing requires assimilating it with the rest of the body, capturing an attitude—and much more. by Dan Gheno Study for the Angel in Madonna of the Rocks by Leonardo, silverpoint
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  • In this excerpt from the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , David Mayernik discusses how copying the work of Old Masters trains his taste so he can draw and paint original work with the classical beauty he reveres. by Bob Bahr For David Mayernik , who has gone
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  • This helpful drawing exercise for drawing faces appeared in the fall 2006 issue of Drawing . If you have trouble seeing and drawing the nose close to the eye when you are drawing a head, be sure to try this exercise. by Dan Gheno Skull From Above by Dan
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored the art of drawing realistic heads. Here, we present an excerpt from the article about drawing with light and shadows. by Dan Gheno Study of a Boy With His Hand to His Mouth by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored the sometimes daunting task of drawing accurate heads. Here, we suggest one technique from the article that will help you use perspective to better gauge the tilt of the head. by Dan Gheno Stereometric Man
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored John Singer Sargent's brilliant drawings. Here, we offer an excerpt from the article that discusses Sargent's use of light and dark values. by Mark G. Mitchell ”I think the chief characteristic
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  • Ohio artist Linda Wesner depicts American scenes that are quickly disappearing because she feels it is important that the viewer recognize the universal theme of change. by Bob Bahr Light Along the Hudson 2006, colored pencil, 25 x 12¾. All artwork
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  • In the January 2007 issue of American Artist , Ohio artist Linda Wesner depicted American scenes that were quickly disappearing because she felt it was important that the viewer recognized the universal theme of change. We offer 16 more of her colored
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explained how to draw dynamic heads. We present an excerpt from the article about measuring facial features. by Dan Gheno In my “Portrait Painting” article in the February 1993 issue of American Artist
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored how the best lessons in value, light, and form are clearly visible in John Singer Sargent's drawings. We present a excerpt from the article that discusses how he taught drawing classes. by Mark G. Mitchell
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  • We recently spotlighted Christopher Hart and his cartooning techniques. Here, we present more images from Hart's Drawing Faeries series (Watson-Guptill, New York, New York).
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Drawing , we explored how Sigmund Abeles has shown several generations of artists the drawing basics : how to draw with organic lines, logical compositions, and lots of empathy. Here, we present an exerpt from the article about
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  • In the summer 2006 issue of Drawing , New York artist Lisa Dinhofer drew convincing objects in imaginary spaces, finding meaning in both the items and their presentation. In contrast, we offer nine of her playful oil paintings in this online exclusive
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  • Chicago artist Tim Lowly communicates compassion and acceptance in his depictions of vulnerable humans. by Joseph C. Skrapits Portrait of K 2006, charcoal on toned museum board, 19 x 141/2. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise
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  • This New York artist draws convincing objects in imaginary spaces, finding meaning in both the items and their presentation. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Into the Light: Yellow 2004, colored pencil and collage, 19 x 22. Collection the artist. New York artist
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  • Tonal drawing--the juxtaposition of relative values, the notion of seeing masses rather than outlines--more closely replicates the way humans see than do lines. This emotional way of depicting the world has been explored since Leonardo; modern artists
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  • “One of the biggest reasons painters get into trouble is because their pictures don’t have a solid foundation of accurate and expressive drawings,” says New York artist Jon DeMartin. That’s why his drawing workshops are so helpful
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  • As the son of Betty Edwards, the author of Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain , Brian Bomeisler helps students access the right side of their brains to improve their drawings. The following describes the first day of Bomeisler’s five day drawing
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