Tag: Oilblog

Van Gogh's Yellow

It is well known that the rise of Impressionism was due in part to the new developments in paint chemistry which created brighter, more stable colors previously unavailable for oil painting. View of Arles with Irises by Vincent van Gogh, oil painting. One of the artists who embraced and experimented with the new color technology…

What’s Sfumato with You?

Each day, people from all over the globe travel to Paris to visit the most famous oil painting in the world, the Mona Lisa. Many are just curious, and want to see the real thing for themselves. Some admire the famous enigmatic smile, the perfect proportions and ideal composition of the piece. Still others seek…

Should You Take a Workshop?

I deliberately entitled this post using a word that I have eliminated from my vocabulary: Should. Like sunrise to a new day, the right workshop can lead you to fresh new beginnings in your art pursuits. Awakening by Steve Henderson, 24 x 40, oil painting, also available as note cards. Too often we do things…

Silver Bullets and Miracle Pills

Different people attend painting workshops with varying expectations, but the ones who get the most out of the experience are those who recognize that workshops are not: A workshop gives you the opportunity to start at one point in your artistic journey and walk through your own passage to the other side. Passage by Steve…

Investing in Art

I love my Honda Fit. And while that may seem to have nothing to do with art, actually, it does. You see, I drive my Honda Fit everywhere and in the process of its being used it gets dusty, the tires see wear, the interior windows next to where my Toddler sits get coated with…

Get Out of Your Comfort Zone! Um . . . Why?

“When someone tells you to ‘get out of your comfort zone,’ wait for it. It’s highly likely that they’re subtly or not-so-subtly nudging you into doing something that they know you don’t want to do, but they need done.” — Steve Henderson Just because we’re in our comfort zone as painting artists, doesn’t mean that we’re…

How to Let Flashes of Inspiration Come

Swimming in the ocean of life, so to speak, it sometimes feels as though we must use every bit of energy to keep our heads above the waves. Over many years we have developed some techniques that help us to shed the heavy seaweed and barnacles of the daily thoughts that occupy our minds, and…

Are We Wired for Beauty?

Flamenco by Ann Trusty, oil painting, 48 x 60. The science community is busy investigating the mechanisms and processes by which people are able to perceive the world around them and make visual sense of it. There are many basic questions still to be answered. For example, a six-year-old possesses the mundane ability to distinguish…

Reflections on Creating an Artistic Body of Work

Inkhead, 2009, oil on canvas, 29 x 16. Dorothy, 2010, oil on canvas, 14 x 14. Anakin Padawan, 2009, oil on canvas, 44 x 28. I have blogged previously about preparing for my exhibit, “Myths and Individuals.” I worked on the paintings, and planned this show for almost three years, so needless to say, I…

Reconnect with Your Passion

The loss of an artist and teacher from childhood has caused me to reflect upon not only her life and work, but also those lessons that she taught me. The myriad distractions of daily life, from the constant need to earn money for survival to the many mundane chores and tasks required to keep it…

Self-portrait by Leonardo Da Vinci, red chalk drawing, 1510-1515.

A Simple Productivity Tip from Da Vinci

Ever wondered where Da Vinci found the time to create all his masterpieces? Alongside his fine art painting he managed to dabble as a scientist, geologist, architect, mathematician, engineer, and anatomist with a bit of aeronautical design thrown in for good measure! So how can we adopt a little bit of Da Vinci in our…

Portrait of Ginevra di Benci by Leonardo da Vinci,1474-1476, oil painting on wood, 16.5 x 14.5.

Painting Portraits with Personality, Mood, and Character

Portrait of Ginevra di Benci by Leonardo da Vinci, 1474-1476, oil painting on wood, 16.5 x 14.5. I’ve described the most important technical parts of my study of Da Vinci: line and anatomy. When I began to study how to paint, I opted not to follow his methods, so I haven’t got anything to share…