Gouache

Opaque watercolor.


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  • Overlay by Ali Cavanaugh, 12 x 12, watercolor painting. As a wannabe artist, I have a lot of years ahead of me to invest in perfecting my painting. Knowing this, I often think about the medium I will choose to work with—what will grow with me through
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  • Passing clouds from my window by Jos van Riswick . The artist has made a commitment to doing a postcard-size oil painting a day. Wherever I visit, I always send my parents postcards. It's a way of sharing my travel experience with them; giving them
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  • I’m a color junkie. In fashion, in design, and especially in painting, vibrant color is what gets me creative. But before the image of Mimi from The Drew Carey Show becomes forever attached to my name in your mind, I’ll point out that I can control myself…sometimes. It’s tough
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  • Slicker by Mary Whyte, watercolor painting, 18 1/2 x 18. I went through a phase when I thought I could control everything--where my career was headed, how my relationships were going to turn out, and what kind of life I was going to have. Ah, I crack
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  • On a sunny winter day it's so hard sometimes to overcome the temptation to go outdoors with a sketchbook! Snow and sun make a special light and colors you never see in any other season. So why not to go out for a winter plein air painting session
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  • If you haven't had an opportunity to see the works of Anders Zorn in person, you might want to get a copy of the exhibition catalog for a show of his work at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The book, Anders Zorn: Sweden's Master Painter
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  • Over and over again I hear artists cooing about the thick richness of oil paints and its appealing spreadability, and yes, all of that is totally true. But artist Bev Jozwiak is giving oil a run for its money in terms of buttery appearance and saturated colors, and she’s doing it with watercolor
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  • A couple of months ago I posted some outdoor watercolor painting sketches of my Finland trip in the Artist Daily Member Gallery . One of the comments I received was from Harry R. Gray, in which he wrote: "...and giving watercolor its full respect
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  • As we head into the end of the year and the heart of winter, it is nice to keep our inner artistic fires burning with visual inspiration and a wellspring of techniques to explore so that we make the most of a period of time that can otherwise just slip
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  • No apologies from me for that attempt at sensationalism (I would have written tabloid headlines in another life). The truth is I was lucky enough to sit down and chat with artist and instructor C.W. Mundy, who is generous with both his time and his talents. We chatted about his upbringing, strategies
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  • The Girl with the Wineglass by Johannes Vermeer, 1659. We are in a social time of the year. Holiday parties, galas, end-of-the-year revelries—there are celebrations galore. What’s great about such occasions for artists, in addition to seeing
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  • There is great interest today in reviving traditional methods and techniques of painting. Much of this interest comes about from the loss or absence of these methods in the teaching curricula of many art schools and university art programs. We have informally
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  • The Lantern Bearers by Maxfield Parrish, 1908, oil on canvas board, 40 x 32. I have a confession to make: I've never glazed an oil painting. The process intimidates me a bit—creating luminosity and an inner glow on canvas is no easy feat—and
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  • Good painters don’t merely re-create what is in front of them. An experienced artist knows how to create a successful painting no matter what situation or model he or she is presented with. Of course, this often comes after years of practice and experimentation—as well as the development
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  • Jacqueline Kamin paints with a sculptural sensibility that isn’t at all foreign to her practice. Earlier in her career she spent time as a bronze bust sculptor. “Working with sculpture is a lot of fun,” Kamin says. “It is very tactile and organic, but it takes a toll physically
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  • The limbs of each figure is achieved with a quick stroke in this watercolor sketch by Wendy Artin. When I think of gesture drawings or quick studies, I see myself with a pencil in hand—that's always just made sense for those kinds of spirited
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  • I'm always surprised that the so-called ‘Painter of Light' isn't a watercolorist. Luminous light effects are what the medium is all about, and watercolor artist Jean Grastorf has created a unique body of watercolor paintings showcase
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  • Shaker Barns by Charles Sheeler, 1945, tempera on board. When I think of the features that make up a truly American landscape, there’s one structure that always sticks out in my mind—a big, broadsided barn. They dot the countryside from coast
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  • J.M.W. Turner's works are awe-inspiring because the artist started with movement and power, light and volume, before ever even settling on his subject. I hit a wall trying to write today. I wanted to write about the importance of expressing strong
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  • Successful artists wear many hats. That's just the way it is. You are a one-person art business: a marketer, gallerist, art dealer, web master, agent, and, lest we forget, the creator of paintings or drawings that are worthwhile, powerful, and have
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  • When I’m landscape painting I’m always drawn to the curious, in-between places where the outdoors and indoors meet. This could be an ivy-smothered barn that almost looks like it is disappearing into the landscape, or an ocean view from an open window. The places where architecture and the
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  • Drawing with ink takes the precision of a master draftsman and the skill of a watercolorist handling a fluid medium. When I was in school I was completely captivated by the silky dark lines of one of the most famous pen and ink artists, Aubrey Beardsley
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  • Fall is my favorite season. It's the season for starting over and discovering something new, harnessing your potential and looking around you with fresh eyes. As an artist it is the perfect time of year to cleanse your "palette" and take
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  • I judge a successful cityscape painting by whether or not the architecture, the weather, and the figures—everything in the painting—combine to transport me somewhere different. If that happens and the barrier between my reality and the painted alternative gets a little blurry, letting me
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  • Artists are the sharpest of observers, attuned to a person's passing gesture or the play of light and shadow on a building façade—but not everything that catches our eye is a painting waiting to happen. For Utah watercolorist Joseph Alleman , the stories that hold his interest are reflections
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  • With summer in full swing, I've been spending as much time as possible outdoors, going to concerts and plays, walking from place to place when I do my errands, and just finding every excuse for an outdoor excursion. Landscape painting is another perk of the season. There's something invigorating
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  • Sketching on location is definitely one of the most powerful sources of information, joy, and inspiration for an artist. At least for me. I love to paint cityscapes--the buildings, roads, cars, and people. To collect ideas for my paintings I just walk
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  • Jeremiah by Michelangelo Buonarroti, Sistine Chapel, 1511. Rondanini Pieta by Michelangelo, 1564. I think the affinity that I have for art is definitely inborn. Art isn’t something I grew up with or was tutored in, so when I stumbled upon it on
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  • Collage materials can add visual interest and texture to a painting surface. Artwork by Misty Mawn. When I feel creatively blocked or bored, I revert back to childhood and start to play. Doodling, writing stream-of-conscious text, or painting loosely
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  • There is a lot we have to juggle in our lives. As I think I've told you before, I have a list to keep track of my to-do lists because there are so many little details swirling around in my head. I know it is pretty much the same for you. But I also
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  • The initial idea of this watercolor painting came to my mind when I was caught at the bus station waiting until a heavy rain was over. I took several photos on my cell phone while I was there. You can see how different are all these pictures are! The
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  • Brooklyn-based artist Allison Maletz doesn't want to use watercolor in a traditional way. Although her work is representational and often figure-based, exploring themes of human connection and the quirky, often dysfunctional, "average American family," she refuses be bound by any rules
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  • William Zorach is a well-known 20th-century sculptor who participated in the Armory Show of 1913 and whose work is held in numerous public collections. But as his career unfolded and he found his way as a sculptor, watercolors were always part of his practice.
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  • Almost any artist will tell you that there's a certain appeal to working outdoors that can't be found anywhere else. With spring in full swing, many of us have left our studios for our porches, backyards, and beyond. To celebrate the season and all of the landscape art being made, here are 10
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  • One of the best things about joining the Artist Daily team is seeing incredible artwork on a daily basis. This is especially true in the area of watercolor. I wasn't too familiar with many contemporary artists working in the medium before I started working here, but I've become quite the watermedia
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  • As we all start getting ready to step outside our studios and paint outdoors or create studio landscape painting based on our experiences in nature, I wanted to explain the design elements that I put together for this particular painting, Summer Wind
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  • It’s only May, and already I’m fantasizing about summer road trips and exotic jaunts. But then I remember that almost every time I go on vacation my glow wears off once the artists show up. Inevitably, I see a traveler who is painting or sketching, creating significant and personal mementos
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  • For just a few seconds, I thought that watercolor painting pencils were some kind of April Fool's come lately prank. I mean, everything I think of and know about watercolor painting is that it is fluid and kind of uncontrollable. In a pencil, how
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  • We are not alone as artists in our passion for gardens. We follow in the footsteps of several rather impressive artists throughout history. Our personal gardens are designed for plein air painting and inspire us in every season. But this year, we have
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  • You can go the less extreme route, of course, but there is something to be said about a studio painting session in which you don't pick up a brush. You don't make any sketches. You just observe. I find myself doing this again and again when I
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  • Let me first clarify that the watercolor painting technique of white-on-white isn't a highfalutin, conceptual idea of existentialism and the true meaning of art. No, it allows watercolor artists to achieve brilliant and bright shades of white and
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  • Is color important in a work of art? Most would say a loud yes! However, look at the wonderful work of the great, late artist, Andrew Wyeth. His Dad, the famous illustrator N.C. Wyeth, was often telling Andrew that he needed to put more color in his paintings
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  • Artist Allison Maletz forcibly breaks with convention and defies the observed rules of watercolor painting, working in ways that seem contrary to what the medium is capable of doing and exploring subject matter that can spark uncomfortable and often contradictory
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  • Here's a sneak peek at a great upcoming watercolor blog by artist and instructor Robert Reynolds on the importance of color and how personal choosing pigments can be. And after you are done, be sure to check out the new book, Watercolor Unleashed
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  • Working with artists is a lot of fun. Really, I would put nothing before it in terms of what I want to do with my life's work. But sometimes it can be a little like herding kittens, and it can get really frustrating if the artists aren't organized
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  • It’s quite sad that 18 th -century painter Luis Melendez died poor and relatively unknown and yet he is now recognized as one, if not the, greatest still life art painter of his day. His style and approach as a still life artist breathed new life
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  • We're pleased to announce that the Grand Prize winner in the "What Do You Love?" watercolor art contest is Johne Richardson, of Overland Park, Kansas. Congratulations, Johne! The winning image will be featured alongside the artist's
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  • Another slice of my personal humble pie is the fact that I'm pretty bad at math in general and downright horrible at geometry in particular. You'd never ever find me trying to use these skills when making art--or so I thought. But when I was gleaning
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  • Artists who step outside their studios take a leap of faith. When you determine that you are ready to create a plein air painting , you take a chance with lighting, composition, color, and time. All of these are variables that you need to contend with
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  • As much as I love the holidays I also stress a lot about gift-giving. I'm a people pleaser and want the friends and loved ones in my life to feel appreciated, which means I can sometimes get super anxious about how to show them how I feel. Myths:
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  • When I met a woman who told me about the best watercolor painting instructor she'd ever had, I had to know more. There are so many artists out there whose work is compelling but that doesn't always make them good teachers. I had to know what put
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  • We all enjoy using Facebook to stay connected to our friends and family, and Pinterest is a lot of fun for collecting and sharing ideas, but have you thought about how you can utilize these social media tools as part of your overall art business marketing
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  • I love that John Cougar Mellencamp song! Mostly because it reminds me of being young, and that life is full of possibilities and change. It's also a great reminder that the "small" stories of our everyday lives are the ones that matter most
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  • When it comes to putting additives into your paints, it just isn't the same as eating a Twinkie or bag of Doritos. Additives are necessary in some cases, especially for landscape artists who work with varying conditions when painting outdoors . They
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  • I am rolling my eyes with embarrassment when I tell you that when I first saw watercolor paintings with wide expanses of color I assumed that these were applied and then wiped out and smoothed over after they were laid down. I had no idea that there were
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  • I was reminded that art grows in the most unlikely places and conditions when I recently heard about the art scene that is showing distinct signs of life in Fayette County, Georgia. Wildlife watercolorist Dylan Scott Pierce teaches students about layering
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  • It's that time again: the time for nations big and small to meet and lay claim to their dominance based on overinflated biceps--um, I mean, athletic prowess. I'm talking about the Olympics, of course. Whether you're an avid Games-watcher or
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  • Every now and then an artist's body of work will resonate with me as being amazing, incredible, and just right not because the paintings or sculptures show technical skill or I'm moved by the subject matter, but because the artist seems to have
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  • If art was a place on the map, pencil sketching would be its somewhat lawless backcountry. Sketching is all about freedom from rules and learning how to sketch what's in front of you no matter how unexpected. That's why sketching seem like the
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  • When an artist chooses to work representationally, he or she inevitably has to take a stance on the use of photographs and the artistic merits of photorealism. Whether perusing a workshop catalog or engaged in a debate with fellow colleagues, the question
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  • Painters and draftsmen alike puzzle through perspective drawing issues. They almost have to if they want to establish any kind of sense of space in their work. Without linear perspective, all that remains is the flatness of the surface-and no artists
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  • Plein air artists are the first to tell you that you can go back to the same site over and over again during different times of day and it is like being in a whole other place. Light does that! It can turn a bright and sunny scene into a murky and mysterious
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  • We had a run of some pretty severe thunderstorms in the New York City area recently, and as a father of three, that's terrifying. Nothing can be worse than three kids under the age of five locked up in a house for a day, especially when the thermometer
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  • I chatted with a watercolor painting workshop student the other day who sighed, "I'm not a real artist. I probably never will be." "Why?" I asked. "First, because I'm still taking painting workshops and learning. Second
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  • Watercolor Painting Step-by-Step Demonstration Rousillon is a sleepy village in the Luberon region of Provence, well-known for its ochre mines that provided the pigments for the manufacture of paints, including the ones we artists use. On our last workshop
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  • When plein air painting , one of the most enjoyable and facile medias I've found to work with has to be watercolors. Hands down. The supplies are minimal, you can paint quickly and move from place to place making sketches of what catches your interest
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  • In any painting, the biggest expenditure for the artist is the frame that goes around the finished piece. If it's a watercolor painting, there's the matting, the glazing, and the frame holding it all together; for the oil on canvas or acrylic
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  • I now have my own range of watercolor painting brushes and while going through the process of choosing their design, fond memories came flooding back to me from my time living and studying art in China. There I was fortunate enough to meet a wonderful
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  • We are big admirers of J. M. W. Turner's work in oil and watercolor, especially his magnificent, ethereal watercolor paintings . Unfortunately many of his paintings are much less vivid today than they were when he painted them. We know this from written
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  • Regardless of the kind of art you practice, if you have any hopes of making a living at it, you'll eventually have to share your creations, whether at an open mic, in a YouTube video, or putting together an oil painting group show with artist friends
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  • You don't have to think terribly hard to figure out that the painting genre that has all of these characteristics in common is floral painting . It is a practice that has inspired artists to create beautiful, graceful paintings for centuries, but
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  • My mom is an artist, but she's nothing like me. For all that, we're both artists. If you want to know where I got my artist genes, I got most of them from her. Genes alone don't make an artist, though. Making art is kind of a stupid career
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  • I've heard of painting for yourself, for school, for work, but painting for the trash can?! Artist and watercolor painting instructor Jean Haines explains why working this way isn't rubbish at all. Enjoy! The aim of being an artist is to create
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  • The Sensorium by Walton Ford, 2003, watercolor, gouache, pencil and ink on paper, 152.9 x 302.3 cm. Yes, that is a complete exaggeration. But my point is that a lot of times in the art world people tend to silo or separate genres of painting to such an
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  • Carnations flowing in a loose watercolor with exciting watermarks and color effects evident within the composition. I have just taken a week of watercolor painting workshops and I came across a problem that many watercolor artists have in common. Many
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  • In our new special issue, American Artist guides you through the most important aspects of the painting process, from selecting your materials to preparing a canvas to advanced techniques for accurately depicting landscapes and figures.
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  • Moonrise, La Giudecca, Venice by JMW Turner, 1829, watercolor painting, 8 7/8 x 11 1/4. Delicacy, luminousness, light, and color--these are what you can expect when you look at a watercolor painting . But details? Heck no--or at least, not much. With
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  • At least I feel that way. I set myself a goal this week—I wanted to learn a few new watercolor painting techniques because I feel like when I contemplate working in watercolor, I only know the "first gear" approaches. I feel like Tim Saternow
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  • The aim of being an artist is the ability to create. But with this desire of wishing to constantly achieve wonderful paintings that can be framed or exhibited comes an enormous amount of pressure on our shoulders. We expect to always succeed in our goal
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  • Elton , 11 x 14, mixed media on gesso board, 2011. Yesterday was an interesting day for me. I thought I was near finished with a painting I had been working on for over three months, but when I sent it over to my agent in New York, who I call my third
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  • Old Cedar by Bill Guffey, oil, 18 x 24. Peasant by Joan Langdon, watercolor painting, 10.5 x 11.5. Tomiko by Adriana Guidi, oil on canvas panel, 14 x 18. That's Brian Neher's mantra for his upcoming free art contest , and it is one that I can
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  • Astor Place by Emily Falco, watercolor painting, 14 1/2 x 14 1/2, 2009. It warms my heart when I hear artists expressing excitement about their chosen painting medium because artists are the ones in the business of knowing all the ins and outs of their
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  • We spent a lot of painting time along the cliffs outside San Juan. Painting can be a pretty isolating affair, and though I love the alone time spent with my muse, I miss the collective energy that working in a group of like-minded colleagues provides
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  • Philadelphia Story II--Spires by Sarah Yeoman, watercolor painting, 14 x 20. I don't mean literally shrink it, but if you take a photo of your painting and reduce it to thumbnail size and it still holds together compositionally, you've got a good
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  • Watercolor artist Thomas Schaller achieves convincing and dynamic effects in his skies ( Salisbury Cathedral , watercolor painting). I know it is a bias, but sometimes I can't help thinking that painting skies belongs to a particular realm of watercolor
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  • I adore color—deep ruby reds, bold blues, verdant greens, rich golden yellows...I could go on and on, but one thing that I often forget in my zeal is that color is not just a matter of hue. Saturation and subtle color layers also play a huge part
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  • Ariadne by Janet Rogers, watercolor painting. Since coming to Artist Daily, my parents are both super supportive of me and our web community. My mom does her best to get everyone she knows to join us at Artist Daily, and my dad buys me art supplies in
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  • The Coming Storm by George Inness, 1879, oil on canvas, 27 1/4 x 41 3/4. Are you as bored of pretty outdoor painting scenes as I am? My eyes just seem to glaze over when I see a plein air painting scene with picture perfect sunlight over an idyllic landscape
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  • The Gossips by Norman Rockwell, 1948. I think every one of us loves Norman Rockwell's illustrations, whether it is a little bit or a lot. They tell stories and always seem to capture expressions and reactions so perfectly. My favorite has always been
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  • This is one of the artist's more traditional pieces in terms of his painting process. ( Raspberry House by Jamie Wyeth, 1988, watercolor, 22 1/2 x 28 1/2.) Watercolor is one of those wondrous materials that can be manipulated in so many different
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  • Farm Visitors by Hardie Gramatky, watercolor, 1971. I can't get over the fact that Watercolor magazine is celebrating its 25 th year. For a quarter of a century it has been the eyes and ears of watermedia artists all over the country, and has featured
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  • This issue marks the 25th Anniversary of Watercolor. To celebrate, we present 25 tips, 25 painting locations, and 25 tools that today's top watermedia painters say they can't do without. We also take a look at the innovations of early practitioners and trace the masterful use of watercolor throughout
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  • Self-Portrait by Kristin Kunc, oil on linen, 2011. As you probably well know, I'm online...a lot. And I'd like to think of myself as somewhat well informed about artist websites. I'm on them all the time—whether it is through an email
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  • When I flipped through the Fall issue of Watercolor magazine—celebrating their 25 th year in print (whoop whoop!)—I was super impressed with the feature article on "25 Artists to Watch." It confirms what I know is happening out in
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  • I was born and raised in the suburbs, with rural farmland and city centers nearby so I have an unbiased appreciation for both. I'm attuned to the natural elements around me and I love to be outdoors, but I also get so energized by the sights and sounds
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  • I put aside my oil painting work to take up a sketchbook and watercolors to capture the sights and sounds around me during my trip . If you are a painter, you know that sometimes the best thing to do is get away from it all...and do more painting. I was
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  • John had to deal with rapidly changing weather conditions as he worked on his plein air watercolor painting, Cub Lake Trailhead . We outdoor painters are always on the search for beautiful places to paint, and so we become inveterate travelers and explorers
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  • Ocean II by John Hulsey, 30 x 40, oil painting. The painting Ocean II was created from a smaller plein air study created at sunrise on Isle of Palms, South Carolina. I liked the composition and colors, and especially the way the wet sand mirrored the
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  • New Year by Mary Whyte, watercolor painting of a milliner from Atlanta, GA; 2009, 22 1/2 x 29. Sometimes I get so sick of people calling a painting or drawing 'art' because it has a good-looking person in it. Who wants to hang out with Barbie
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  • As any artist can attest, versatility is the key to a long and illustrious career. The ability to work with a variety of media, subject matter, and techniques helps keep skills up-to-date, the mind engaged, and one's creativity consistently challenged. With that in mind, we've decided to use
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  • America is a land of rich diversity that extends throughout our landscapes, cities, and regions. I'd say that one of the most distinctive places we have is Cape Cod. Now, being a born-and-raised Southern girl, I have always romanticized the northern coasts and beaches because they always look so
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  • Plein air watercolor sketches of sites in Kansas and Charleston, South Carolina. All works by John Hulsey. It took me awhile to realize it, but I have invented a time machine. I didn’t set out to invent a time machine exactly, but like many other
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  • In a recent post on how to paint clouds at sunset , we diagrammed a pastel painting and explained a bit about the types of clouds one may encounter when painting outdoors . This time, we have dissected a watercolor, Ghost Ranch IV , that I painted in New Mexico near Georgia O’Keefe’s house
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  • My answer to that is nada! Zippo! Zilch! As the weather heats up from coast to coast, now is the time when artists turn their attention to the excitement of landscape painting. But I'll be honest with you. I'm still intimidated by the whole landscape painting process. There seems to be so much
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  • Champs Elysees by John Salminen, watercolor painting. John Salminen: Weekend With the Masters Instructor John Salminen was born and raised in St. Paul, Minnesota. He earned his bachelor's degree and master's degree from the University of Minnesota
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  • Serra Chapel by Timothy Clark, watercolor painting, 29 x 40, 2006. Timothy J. Clark: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Timothy J. Clark is a master watercolorist and oil painter whose work is included in the permanent collections of The Butler Institute
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  • Graffiti by Mary Whyte, watercolor painting. Mary Whyte: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Born in Ohio in 1953, Mary Whyte grew up with all the rural Midwest has to offer. She graduated from Tyler School of Art, in Philadelphia, in 1976 with a Bachelor
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  • February Shadows, Rio Grande by Stephen Quiller, acrylic painting, 17 x 19 1/2. Stephen Quiller: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Stephen Quiller is an internationally known painter who works primarily in water media, monotypes, and intaglio printmaking
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  • Handline Hook by Stephen Scott Young, watercolor painting, 2010, 10 1/2 x 19 1/2. Stephen Scott Young: Weekend With the Masters Instructor Stephen Scott Young grew up in St. Augustine, Florida, and studied at the Ringling College of Art and Design, in
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  • Here's John using his heavy-weight watercolor gear while painting in Colorado. Through trial and error, over the years, we have figured out how to pack for our foot-powered plein-air painting adventures. We like to keep our heavy-duty Eagle Creek
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  • Slicker by Mary Whyte, 2010, watercolor. Watercolor magazine and the Burchfield Penney Art Center in Buffalo, New York have come together for a very special event: WaterMedia Weekend 2011 . It is the opportunity for total immersion in the medium you love
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  • Turn Mistakes into Masterpieces; create the element of surprise with acrylics; get creative with Sunlight and Shadow; use value studies To Save Time; go inside Workshops With the Pros
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  • Learn more about Mary Whyte’s full-length DVD. I'm a reader and studier by nature, but the lessons and techniques that I learn from books and magazines always seem to click much quicker when I watch an artist paint, rather than try to puzzle
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  • Sunlight by Carol Carter, watercolor, 22 x 30. Mark Mehaffey, Nicholas Simmons, Keiko Tanabe, Carol Carter, Thomas W. Schaller, and Kathleen Alexander have formed the North American Watercolor Artists, a group of six U.S. watercolor artists, to represent
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  • Watercolorist Stephen Scott Young getting into the details of his watercolor technique with students. All photos by Manuel Rodriguez . Artists of the past are often remembered as working solo, toiling alone in their private studios and intimate garrets
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  • On the Cover: Seaside Stroll (detail) by Alan Wylie, 1993, watercolor, 15 x 21. Private collection. FEATURES Artist to Artist: Dale Meyers Cooper With a career spanning nearly 50 years and work in the permanent collections of such institutions as the
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  • Experiment with Acrylic; Learn from the Masters: Hawthorne, Hensche & Sargent show you how to become A better artist; Drawing from Life; Combine Media in Deep & Meaningful Still Lifes
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  • It’s often said in sports circles that the best players often make the worst coaches. That’s because it is hard for naturally gifted athletes to relate to players who are not so innately talented. A perfect example of this is former Boston
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  • When I moved to New Hampshire in the mid-1990s, I joined a local art association where the members were a mixture of "newbies" as well as seasoned professionals. In many cases the "old pros" helped us newbies learn, not only how to
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  • Greek Steps, Sifnos by Thomas W. Schaller, 2008, watercolor, 12 x 9. I just finished writing an article on Thomas W. Schaller's watercolor paintings for the April 2010 issue of American Artist, and it occurred to me that Thomas is the third licensed
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  • Back in 1994, after my husband and I relocated to New Hampshire, an artist friend invited me to join a group of painters and photographers who met every Wednesday morning at a quaint café in downtown Nashua. This group of about a dozen artists
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  • The beach scene in Manuel Antonio. I normally paint with oils mixed with Galkyd fast-drying medium, so I assume I can make radical changes in the composition of shapes, values, and colors as I formulate the intended outcome of my pictures. But I had to
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  • The basic set of supplies John Hulsey uses when painting on location. The recent spat of wet weather in New York has made it difficult to get outside to paint, but that doesn’t mean we in the American Artist offices haven’t been thinking about
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  • Check out what's featured in the December 2009 issue of American Artist .
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  • Roses and Delphiniums by Janet Walsh, 2009, watercolor, 201⁄2 x 16. Janet Walsh recently stopped by our New York office to deliver a new set of watercolor paintings to be photographed for her next article in Watercolor magazine. The images will
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  • Although I am known for using vibrant colors to create what appear to be playful, spontaneous images in my watercolor paintings, the key to the success of these paintings is the value structure of the compositions. Here’s how I teach others to use studies to plan effective compositions.
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  • Antonio Masi employs both the atmospheric and graphic capabilities of watercolor in his commanding paintings of New York icons.
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  • Michigan artist Jim Johnson offers valuable hints for successful watercolor painting outdoors.
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  • Check out what's featured in the October 2009 issue of American Artist.
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  • Lori Woodward Simons kicks off her new blog with a post about the 20-hour challenge
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  • Using subtle washes and minimal detail, Keiko Tanabe creates a powerful sense of time and place.
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  • The winners of the Hot 100 Watermedia competition are announced.
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  • Steve Doherty talks about upcoming exhibitions by national watercolor societies, and asks readers to relay their any experiences they have had while participating in juried exhibitions.
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  • The Table of Contents from the May 2009 issue of American Artist .
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  • Artist and teacher Mel Stabin recommends painting loosely and boldly, an approach that has defined his career.
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  • Steve wishes a happy 70th birthday to Joe Miller, owner of Cheap Joe’s Art Stuff, in Boone, North Carolina.
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  • Q: I used masking tape to mask out the border of my watercolor painting but it abraded the surface when I tried to remove it. What did I do wrong? Should I have used frisket? A: Two things may have contributed to your problem with the masking tape sticking
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  • Q: Is there a spray fixative for watercolor paintings, and if so, should I use it? A: There is no fixative for watercolors. Fixatives are primarily used for four purposes: 1) to allow the piece to repel dirt and allow for light cleaning; 2) to make it
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  • Q: Is there a sealer that can be applied to a watercolor painting so that it can be framed and displayed with a glass cover? A: I would suggest using Lascaux Fine Art Fixative. It protects paintings from UV rays and prevents yellowing. It will protect
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  • Q: I’m interested in trying watercolor painting. I took a few classes from a local artist, but I need to learn more of the basics. How can I educate myself about color? I need to experiment, but I also need to read about it. I have medium texture
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  • Q: I don’t know which white to use in my watercolors. How do you choose the right white? A: Many traditional watercolorists will say the only white that should appear in a watercolor painting is the color of the paper—either untouched by the
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  • Emerging oil and watercolor artist Janette Jones is the focus of this exhibition at the Knowlton Gallery, in Lodi, California, during the month of February. Jones, who began her career working in watercolor but recently switched to painting outdoor in
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  • Steve Doherty discusses the social aspects of watermedia painting and the proliferation of watermedia organizations.
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  • Gainesville, Florida, artist Marion W. Hylton is adept at oil, masterful in watercolor, and award-winning in pastel. High Water 2006, pastel, 19 x 26. Collection the artist. Best in Show at the St. Augustine Art Association's Honors Show. By Bob Bahr
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  • We have provided a list of links to online art resources that we think are helpful. You can also access these links in the Art Educators section of our website. Art Associations Plein Air Plein Air Painters of America The Plein Air Scene Indiana Plein
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  • Taylor Road Barn 2007, watercolor, 15 x 22. This week, Joyce Washor looks at a watercolor painting by one of our readers and suggests varying the edges to add a sense of distance to the painting. The artist has done a remarkable job on this painting.
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  • James Toogood comments on Ross Sterling Turner's watercolor painting Fairylands, Bermuda. Fairylands, Bermuda by Ross Sterling Turner, 1890, watercolor and gouache, 18 x 25 1/2. by James Toogood What's most interesting about this painting is the
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  • For many artists, growing and tending to their own gardens provides an additional outlet for creative expression. by Naomi Ekperigin Tulips in a Square Vase, by Susan Van Campen, 2006, watercolor, 23 x 30. Courtesy Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York
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  • In the November 2008 issue of American Artist, we discussed how John Falato enjoys introducing students to the nuts and bolts of watercolor painting. Here, we reproduce additional images of Falato's paintings. Autumn in Southford 2005, Casein on Masonite
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  • Connecticut artist John Falato primarily paints in oil, but he also enjoys introducing students to the nuts and bolts of watercolor in his exciting, fast-paced beginner classes. August Road 1983, watercolor, 21 1/8 x 16. All artwork this article private
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  • Connecticut artist John Falato primarily paints in oil, but he also enjoys introducing students to the nuts and bolts of watercolor in his exciting, fast-paced beginner classes. August Road 1983, watercolor, 21 1⁄8 x 16. All artwork this article
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  • Warm-up exercises are as important for artists as they are for musicians and athletes. by Daniel Grant Warm-ups for artists often involve being spontaneous, loosening up your muscles, and letting go. But jogging might work too! Athletes stretch before
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  • When Chris Krupinski made the transition from oil to watercolor painting, she refused to sacrifice her love of detail and bold, rich color. A Glass of Cherries 2004, watercolor, 30 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist. by Naomi Ekperigin
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  • Painting with watercolor requires an understanding of not only the paints themselves but also how to apply them. by James Toogood Breakers on a Rocky Coast 2005, watercolor, 24 x 18. Private collection. The predominate color in the water is Prussian blue
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  • James Toogood comments on Ogden Pleissner’s watercolor painting St. George's Harbor. by James Toogood St. George's Harbor by Ogden Pleissner, 1953, watercolor, 14 1/4 x 20 1/4. Collection Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art, Paget, Bermuda
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  • James Toogood comments on William Trost Richards' watercolor painting A Rocky Coast. by James Toogood A Rocky Coast by William Trost Richards, 1877, watercolor and gouache on fibrous brown wove paper, 28? x 36¼. Collection The Metropolitan
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  • James Toogood comments on Judy Morris' watercolor painting Chinatown: San Francisco. by James Toogood Chinatown: San Francisco by Judy Morris, watercolor, 34 x 28. This is a delightful piece, not overly serious but beautifully executed. It's a
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  • James Toogood comments on Frederick Brosen's watercolor painting Brooklyn Bridge. by James Toogood Brooklyn Bridge by Frederick Brosen, 2006, watercolor over graphite, 28¾ x 51¾. Courtesy Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, New
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  • James Toogood comments on John Singer Sargent’s watercolor painting Venetian Canal. by James Toogood Venetian Canal by John Singer Sargent, 1913, watercolor and graphite on off-white wove paper, 15¾ x 21. Collection The Metropolitan Museum
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  • James Toogood comments on Mary Cassatt’s watermedia painting Self-Portrait. by James Toogood Self-Portrait by Mary Cassatt, watercolor on ivory wove paper, 33 x 24. Collection National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC. Mary Cassatt was not known
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  • Barbara Edwards experiments with media and techniques in her paintings that make use of both representation and abstraction. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Mountain Pasture 2007, acrylic, 27 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise
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  • Congratulations to the 10 finalists chosen in the 2008 Watercolor Cover Competition. These accomplished artists each take a different approach, revealing the versatility and adaptability of watermedia. Here, they describe their sources of inspiration
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  • As an experimental artist, Minnesotan Lana Grow has no rules. She begins her paintings in different ways and lets them evolve. Like what you read? Become a Watercolor subscriber today! by Linda S. Price Simply Flora 2006, watermedia, 22 x 22. Collection
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  • For this Massachusetts artist, water is both her subject and her medium. Iceberg From Our Zodiac, Antarctica No. 2 2005, watercolor, 24 x 36. All artwork this article collection the artist, unless otherwise indicated. by Naomi Ekperigin The majority of
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  • James Toogood comments on Thomas Girtin’s watercolor painting Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire: Evening. by James Toogood Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire: Evening by Thomas Girtin, ca. 1800, watercolor on laid paper, 12½ x 20½. Collection Victoria
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  • This self-taught artist has found that learning to paint in watercolor is not only fun and challenging, but it also enables her to explore the world around her. Day Job 2007, watercolor, 22 x 12. All artwork this article collection the artist. by Naomi
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  • With the wide range of watercolors available, it is important to know the different formulations to create a palette that best suits your needs. Each side of the table above lists 4 common transparent and opaque pigments. by Naomi Ekperigin Watercolor
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  • This artist, who primarily paints landscapes in transparent watercolor, finds the unpredictability of the medium to be its most enjoyable trait. by Naomi Ekperigin Cascade 2004, watercolor, 19 x 28. All artwork this article private collection unless otherwise
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  • An appropriate background is essential for setting the scene in a still life composition. by Janet Walsh Silver Server With Cups 2002, acrylic, 12 x 24. The artist has done a nice job painting these still life items. However, the artist may want to consider
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  • James Toogood comments on Richard Parkes Bonnington’s watercolor painting A Fisherman on the Banks of a River, a Church Tower in the Distance. by James Toogood A Fisherman on the Banks of a River, a Church Tower in the Distance by Richard Parkes
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  • James Toogood comments on John Sell Cotman’s watercolor painting The Drop-Gate, Duncombe Park. by James Toogood The Drop-Gate, Ducombe Park by John Sell Cotman, ca. 1806, graphite and watercolor on laid paper, 13 x 9. Collection the British Museum
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  • James Toogood comments on Thomas Eakins' watercolor painting John Biglin in a Single Scull. by James Toogood John Biglin in a Single Scull by Thomas Eakins, ca. 1873, watercolor (and gouache?), 19 5/16 x 24 7/8. Collection The Metropolitan Museum
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  • Watch an audio slideshow demonstration, by Lori Woodward Simons, of a watercolor portrait—one of the step-by-step demonstrations in the summer 2008 issue of Watercolor magazine (3:12). Watercolor Portrait with Simons Posted to Artist Daily by Karyn
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  • James Toogood comments on Winslow Homer's watercolor painting Road in Bermuda. by James Toogood Road in Bermuda by Winslow Homer, ca. 1899-1901, watercolor over graphite on cream paper, 14 x 21 1/16. Collection Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, New
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  • Watch summer 2008 Watercolor featured artist Donna Zagotta combining watercolor and gouache to play with color and form in the interior painting Valencia (1:27) . Watercolor demo of hotel interior Posted to Artist Daily by Karyn on October 08, 2009 Click
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  • One of Carla O’Connor’s objectives in a workshop is to persuade students to stop thinking about the tools of watermedia painting—the brushes, paints, and paper—and to focus on expression. To her, focusing on materials is like wondering
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  • Known for his innovative method of using transparent watercolor on a nonabsorbent surface, this California artist employs an open-ended approach. Like what you read? Subscribe to Watercolor today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli Sunday Morning Nougat 2003, watercolor
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  • An elegant combination of traditional tonalism and contemporary design allows Utah artist Shanna Kunz to speak to her viewers in a gently alluring voice. by Jennifer King Christmas Meadows 2003, watercolor, 20 x 24. Private collection. “All of your
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  • As one studies a new medium, it can be useful to learn about the process of masters that came before in order to gain inspiration and insight into tackling various techniques. Here we focus on the great watercolorists of the past. Mink Pond by Winslow
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  • Watch a plein air watercolor demonstration by spring 2008 Watercolor featured artist Lori Woodward Simons Lori Woodward demo on plein air Posted to Artist Daily by Karyn on October 12, 2009 Click to Play | View Details
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  • Varying color and subduing the background helps create an effective floral composition. by Janet Walsh Geraniums 2005, acrylic, 8 x 10. The artist has certainly made good color choices in the bouquet, and has created the feeling of sunlight throughout
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  • Having completed more than 400 watercolor portraits of children, Jane Paul Angelhart knows how to avoid potential problems with muddy paints, uncharacteristic poses, nervous children, and overbearing mothers. Like what you read? Become a Watercolor subscriber
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  • Renowned for his watercolor paintings of the figure, this artist reminds others to simplify, merge the subject with the background, and respond in a way that is natural and authentic. To read more features like this, subscribe to Watercolor today! Watercolor
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  • From the thousands of art-instruction books available, we offer a list of those that have proven beneficial to new artists. by Naomi Ekperigin There are many options available for artists wishing to improve their skills. However, the price and time commitment
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  • We present biographies and artwork from our 20 esteemed watercolor teachers. by Beth Patterson Mary Alice Braukman The Power of Letting Go by Mary Alice Braukman, 2005, mixed media and collage, 22 x 30. Collection the artist. Mary Alice Braukman is an
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  • This New York artist discovers many of his breakthroughs through drawings, depicting strictly what he sees with little thought for accepted standards of draftsmanship. by John A. Parks Study for Eroded Cliff 1955, sepia wash on paper, 18¾ x 23
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  • Throughout his long career, Henry Casselli has looked to drawings to clarify his impressions and better understand his subject. To read more features like this, subscribe to Drawing today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli Study for Sparring Partner 2005, graphite
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  • We present the semifinalists in the pastel category. by Karen Stanger Johnston Changing Channels by Mike Barret Kolasinski, 2007, pastel on archival foam board, 12 x 24. First Place: Mike Barret Kolasinski Chicago artist Mike Barret Kolasinski is passionate
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  • Combining close observation with an intuitive approach, Joyce Washor creates tiny paintings with big impact. To read more features like this, subscribe to Watercolor today! by Tina Tammaro My Cup Runneth Over III 2007, watercolor, 4¾ x 3¾
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  • Despite the demands of her busy life, Arizona watercolorist Carole Hillsbery finds time to paint thoughtfully executed watercolors. by Linda S. Price Puerto Penasco 2006, watercolor, 30 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist unless otherwise
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  • Drawing is critical to Gary Akers’ creative process, helping him to know the subject, decide the value structure and composition, and define the focal point. Like what you read? Become a Watercolor subscriber today! by Lynne Moss Perricelli The
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  • Alabama artist Clint Herring has been successful with watercolors that focus on the architecture and people of the Southern United States and the Bahamas. As one of his dealers explains, the strength of the work is its connection to the rich traditions
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  • When Rhode Island artist Peter Hussey taught himself to paint, he noticed that great artists often used diagonal and curved shapes to bring viewers into and around their pictures. That lesson, along with many others he learned by studying both historic
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  • Most artists want their paintings to be viewed and appreciated by others, and many hope that connection will result in selling art . However, a lot of artists produce more paintings than they sell, and even the most acclaimed artist cannot boast of selling
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  • Likening her process for painting flowers to that of her portraits, Maine artist Susan Van Campen puts patience, skill, and heart into interpreting the life of a flower. by Allison Malafronte Bouquet, June 2006, watercolor, 42 x 29½. All artwork
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  • In the March 2008 issue of American Artist, we discussed how watercolorist Patrick Gordon transitioned into creating large, multipanel oil paintings of flowers. Here, we offer more of his oil flowers as well as a selection of the watercolors from the
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  • After a successful 20-year career as a watercolorist in Tulsa, Patrick Gordon moved to New York to create large, multipanel oil paintings of flowers. “I’ve never worked harder or had more fun than I have in the past few years,” he explains
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  • Texas cattle rancher Lonnie Shan depicts the animals he admires in stunning watercolors, taking great care to capture their personality and soul. by Naomi Ekperigin Hard is the Journey 1991, watercolor, 14 x 10. Collection the artist. Viewing one of Lonnie
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  • Water-soluble colored pencils offer the perfect solution for artists who want to create watercolor effects without the hassle of watercolor paints. by Stephanie Kaplan Plumeria 2006, watercolor pencil, 8 x 10. Watercolorist Kristy Ann Kutch owned a set
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  • Selecting a palette of colors often means limiting the choices, making studies, and experimenting along the way. by Christopher Willard One of the keys to successful watercolor painting is to choose a workable set of colors. Today, with the wide range
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  • By employing a most unusual form of contrast, Yachiyo Beck has found a way to create still lifes with a distinctly personal flavor. by Jennifer King Afternoon Apples 2005, watercolor, 18 x 28. Collection the artist. If one of her paintings looked like
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  • Santa Barbara artist Ann Sanders finds natural beauty in her surroundings and puts it down in pastel using proven methods—and she stresses that you can too. by Bob Bahr Devereux Afternoon 2006, pastel, 11 x 15. Collection Shirley Dettmann. The scenes
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  • We present the semifinalists in the watercolor category. by Karen Stanger Johnston After the Harvest by Gail M. Wheaton, 2003, watercolor, 30 x 22. Collection Evan and Patricia Harter. First Place: Gail M. Wheaton Arizona artist Gail M. Wheaton completed
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  • Renowned watercolorist and workshop instructor Mary Whyte offers readers five tips for creating dynamic works of art in any medium. To read more features like this, subscribe to American Artist today! by Mary Whyte Bean Soup 2006, watercolor, 38 x 28
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  • The National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, DC, is presenting this exhibition of portraits of the former associate justice of the United States, Sandra Day O’Connor, through October 8. The National Portrait Gallery Presents “Portraits of
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  • Knowing how watercolor paints are classified, and how the colors appear on paper and differ among manufacturers, is the critical first step for any watercolor artist. Here’s what you need to know. by Christopher Willard When it comes to watercolor
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  • Childhood memories can have a lasting impact on the artistic imagination and even the creative process. by Carl Dalio Along the Oregon Coast 2007, watercolor, 14½ x 21½. This high view of the Oregon coastline presents a story of endurance
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  • Primarily an oil painter, Elizabeth O’Reilly makes a point of painting the figure in watercolor, where she stretches her painting skills to solve new kinds of problems. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Large Woman With Umbrella 2006, watercolor, 16¼
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  • View a demonstration of Slice of Life by Watercolor magazine feature artist Scott Moore (5:06). > Moore process of still life watercolor Click to Play | View Details
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  • Watercolorist Terry Sellers Buckner, the subject of a feature story in the Spring 2007 issue of Watercolor magazine, explains how she created the portrait Grant Irons in this three-step audio slideshow demonstration. Buckner portrait demo Click to Play
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  • Watercolor Watercolor pigment is sold in cakes, tubes, and pencils. The binding agent for the pigment is usually gum arabic. Many artists prefer watercolor colors in tubes because they allow more-fluid application and increased control over color intensity
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  • Oil Painting Pigments and mediums Oil paint is pigment suspended in oil, usually linseed oil. Painters thin oil paints by adding either more oil or a solvent, such as turpentine--or a mixture of both. In addition to linseed, artists use walnut, poppy
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  • After Colorado artist Stephen Quiller finishes presenting exercises, demonstrations, lectures, and critiques during a workshop, students often comment that no other instructor has covered that vital information with such depth and clarity. Even experienced
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  • After Colorado artist Stephen Quiller finishes presenting exercises, demonstrations, lectures, and critiques during a workshop, students often comment that no other instructor has covered that vital information with such depth and clarity. Even experienced
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  • California artist Alyona Nickelsen uses odorless mineral spirits to dissolve some of the pigment in her colored pencil drawings, eliminating the pencil strokes and creating rich, luminous color. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Sincerely Yours 2006, colored pencil
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  • Despite the differences in their styles, materials, and techniques, the teachers we surveyed offered similar recommendations—up to a point. by M. Stephen Doherty Funchal by Frank Webb, 2005, watercolor, 22 x 30, Collection the artist. Over the past
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  • Helen Klebesadel offers tips on how to introduce the sometimes daunting medium of watercolor to novice painters. by Leanne MacLennan Cedar Dance II 2004, watercolor, 30 x 22. All artwork this article collection the artist. Watercolor instructor Helen
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  • Lori Simons explained her techniques for painting watercolor still lifes . by Lori Simons Velvet Red Bouquet 2005, watercolor, 18 x 14. Collection Kent and Meg Ulery. Never be in a hurry when watercolor painting. Make sure you have ample time to complete
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  • The Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, presents this exhibition of more than 50 watercolors and drawings by American followers of John Ruskin, including nearly a dozen rarely seen works by Ruskin himself, through July
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  • As well as any artist before or since, John Singer Sargent learned the best lessons in value, light, and form and used them throughout his life—lessons clearly visible in his drawings. by Mark G. Mitchell Sleeping Child 1872–1873, graphite
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  • The man who has shaped American watercolor for more than 60 years identifies the historic painters who have made the most of the medium. by M. Stephen Doherty 1. Milton Avery (1893–1965) Tall Tree by Milton Avery, 1943, watercolor, 22 x 30. Private
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  • Offering constructive criticism to students is one of the most important parts of the teaching process. Here we offer educators tips and exercises for facilitating successful critiques among students of different age levels. by Leanne MacLennan Constructive
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  • Forbes and American Artis t again invited a group of artists to spend a week together interpreting a vast Colorado ranch in their choice of medium, subject, and style. by M. Stephen Doherty View of Cat Mountain by Ephraim Rubenstein, 2006, oil, 9 x 17½
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  • While on location at the Forbes Trinchera Ranch, in Colorado, Ruth L. Beeve used watercolor and water-soluble oil to capture a variety of subjects. Back in her California studio, she uses those studies as the basis for more ambitious graphite drawings
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  • We went in search of Anders Zorn in his homeland and discovered a personality large enough to encompass numerous contradictions—and a natural ability to paint in both oils and watercolor. by Bob Bahr When Anders Zorn's name is mentioned in the
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  • Steve Rogers can point to the specific time in his career when his watercolors changed from being average to exceptional. That occurred when he met his future wife, found a subject he was passionate about painting, and had a religious experience. by M
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  • In the “The Art of Travel” article in the January 2007 issue of American Artist , watercolorist Gayle Garner Roski explained how art enhanced her traveling experiences, allowing her to better appreciate her surroundings. Here, Roski further
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  • by M. Stephen Doherty Winter Ain't Far Away watercolor, 15 x 15. Can a pharmacist who describes himself as cheap actually convince artists to trust his advice about buying art supplies? He can if he is passionate about art, respectful of painters
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  • In the fall 2006 issue of Watercolor , we showcased 20 artists that offered a glimpse of what the 25th anniversary issue of Watercolor magazine might look like. Here, we highlight additional paintings by many of these artists in the field of watermedia
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  • What will the 25th anniversary issue of Watercolor magazine look like? The answer could well be determined by the artists in this article who were recommended by teachers who are in contact with some of the most promising watercolorists. We asked those
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  • Editor-in-chief of Watercolor magazine, M. Stephen Doherty, recounts his memorable visit to the home of legendary watercolorist Andrew Wyeth. by M. Stephen Doherty In this account of my visit with Andrew Wyeth, I hope to convey the sense that he is like
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  • Sondra Freckelton is widely recognized for her well-planned, thoughtful, and expertly crafted watercolors she develops using principles that expand artistic expression; and she is appreciated for helping others learn those principles while gaining a concrete
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  • Lee Boynton, a master of Impressionistic watercolor painting, explains how to learn more about color and value by simplifying your subject and painting it repeatedly under different light conditions. by Linda Gottlieb and M. Stephen Doherty Cozy Harbor
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  • This New York artist draws convincing objects in imaginary spaces, finding meaning in both the items and their presentation. by Lynne Moss Perricelli Into the Light: Yellow 2004, colored pencil and collage, 19 x 22. Collection the artist. New York artist
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  • Artists often limit their potential by not taking full advantage of watercolor paints and supplies. Here’s advice that has proven helpful to my students. by Catherine Hillis There is so much conflicting information and advice available to watercolor
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  • "My goal," says Andy Evansen, "is to finish a painting in only three washes." Through simplification, bold brushstrokes, a bit of planning, and confidence, the Minnesota watercolorist capitalizes on the medium's ability to render
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  • Celebrated English watercolorist Alexander Creswell is the focus of this exhibition at Hirschl & Adler Modern, in New York City, October 5 through November 4. The Grand Scale: New Watercolors by Alexander Creswell October 5 through November 4, 2006
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