New transparent acrylics

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on 12 Nov 2009 7:27 AM

Was going through my Cheap Joes catalog and noticed a new product by Windsor & Newton: Artists' Acrylics.

The description says that these have a new revolutionary transparent binder - is translucent when wet and dries clear... ensuring virtually no color shift.

 I've been looking for acrylic that has the transparency of oil, and up until now, I've been adding glazing medium to get transparent effects. I don't really enjoy the stark opaqness of acrylic mixtures as they aren't as luminescent as oils... however, I do love the quick drying and ease of cleanup. I'm thinking these new W&N acrylics could be the answer to this dilemma.

Has anyone tried these?

 

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j.b2 wrote
on 14 Nov 2009 3:59 PM

Nice.

This sounds interesting..

Keep us posted, and possiblity with an example...

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Margo5 wrote
on 14 Nov 2009 5:29 PM

Lori, this sounds interesting. Would like to know more.

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Ellen E wrote
on 16 Nov 2009 9:48 AM

I have been trying a few colors of these.  While it is true that there is almost no color shift from wet to dry, I'm not sure you can get oil-like luminosity with these (or any acrylic).  They still dry as your typical acrylic film.   It's worth noting that W&N is only advertising their lack of color-shifting, and not promising that they will look like oils.  I think they are a very good product, though, and I intend to switch over to them as I run out of my other paint tubes.

(Have you considered using water-soluble oils as an alternative?  They don't require solvents for cleanup or application.)

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on 16 Nov 2009 10:19 AM

Ellen, thanks for your reply and info.  Yes, I have been using water-soluble oils for a few years now - especially while I travel. I also have used alkyds - which I like for their quick drying. When I do use water soluble oils, I add a quick drying medium unless I'm working outdoors in warm, dry weather.

I'm still interested in experimenting with glazing acrylic - taking it on as a challenge to see if I can make 'em look like oils. I like the work of Gil Dellinger - his acrylics had me fooled - they look like oils. There are a number of acrylic artists out there whose works look like oils.

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Margo5 wrote
on 16 Nov 2009 10:25 AM

Lori, has anyone posted any water soluble oil paintings?

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on 16 Nov 2009 10:29 AM

I think so, but probably in the "Oil" section of this forum. I'd help you look it up but I need to get to the studio right now.

 

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Margo5 wrote
on 16 Nov 2009 12:27 PM

Lori, that's fine. I'll look it up.

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Ellen E wrote
on 16 Nov 2009 12:28 PM

I also relish the challenge of making acrylics look more luminous... personally I think you can achieve it three different ways (all of them requiring trial and error)...

1) glazing transparent layers (the most time-consuming IMHO)

2) a more impressionist approach where purer colors are strategically placed next to purer colors (not blended so much, or muddied)

3) working "bright to dark" where you block in your painting in high-chroma colors (maybe unnaturally so) and then shading/glazing down their intensity with darker/duller colors.

Although acrylics are seen as the "easy" medium, unfortunately I think beginning painters are not told the facts about acrylics - that it does take a little extra work to make them as vibrant as other media.  Certainly, technical advances can help - i.e. the new Winsor and Newton line - but "the right paints" will never completely solve the challenge by themselves.

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on 16 Nov 2009 12:41 PM

Ellen these are wonderful ideas. I haven't thought of or tried #3... starting bright and then glazing. Sounds like something I'd enjoy. I don't mind taking the time to glaze - one of the reasons why I want to use acrylics instead of oils.

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judyl40 wrote
on 17 Nov 2009 10:19 AM

Yup, these are great ideas. Smile Acrylic glazes will dry a heck of a lot quicker than oils, so you can get to it quicker.

I agree completely, Ellen, about the "right paints"! It's like someone saying that a gifted photographer has a good camera, without giving a nod to the choices the photographer made.

In the end, it's all about the choices...

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seventex wrote
on 18 Nov 2009 9:32 AM

Lori,

I was just at Jerry's "Art of the Carolina's" - I work for Golden Artist Colors in New Berlin NY.

Transparency and luminosity are probably more attainable with acrylics using gels and mediums because you can glaze repeatedly or apply a large quantity of mediums with dramatically less drying time than would be required for a similar application of oils.

But there is more to moving from acylics from oils than the finished luster of the paint on canvas.

 

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on 18 Nov 2009 11:52 AM

Seventex, I have a set of open acrylics, but haven't had much time to experiment with them yet. I am thinking they'd be great to work with outdoors in the warm weather. For studio painting, I definitely prefer quick drying time, so that's why I haven't used the OPEN product much yet. So many mediums... so little time Smile

I'm working on getting a larger studio space set up this week, and I expect that I'll be doing a lot more painting in the coming weeks.

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seventex wrote
on 18 Nov 2009 1:43 PM

That's awesome Lori. A larger studio, sounds like Christmas has come early!

 

Enjoy the new studio.

Christopher

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on 18 Nov 2009 1:59 PM

Christopher, thanks for your advice. I am now anxious to get started experimenting with Open acrylics. I also have a set of Chroma Atelier acrylics too - the company sent me some samples, and I owe them the time and consideration. I'm the kind of artist who uses products from a variety of companies - depending on what my painting objective is. I already have a whole palette of Open acrylics ready and waiting for me.

Now all I need is the time... but with quick drying, that ought to be a cinch! I do paint in oils often, and when I do, I usually paint alla prima. But when it comes to glazing, I'm far too impatient for waiting for the oils to dry - even when using alkyd medium... or alkyd for that fact. That's why I'm so interested in fast drying, no cleanup media.

Of course, I paint in transparent watercolor - for which my work is known, but I've also enjoyed using acrylics transparently on watercolor paper. What can I say - I'm a variety artist Big Smile

 

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