Landscapes From Imagination

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on 20 Oct 2009 6:56 PM

 

Aside from a couple of ink wash landscapes the rest are all watercolor and white gouache for the lights.

Feel free to critique.

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Margo5 wrote
on 20 Oct 2009 7:41 PM

Gregory, one of the nice qualities is the way you have captured your lights. Do you mind if I ask if you use more of a wet-into-wet method, or do you work dark to light like in an oil painting, using white gouache at the end? Do you mix white gouache with your transparent pigments? Do you have access to a good library with lots of books on watercolor? Do you use transparent pigments or more opaque pigments? Do you prefer to paint from imagination, or do you have a chance to take photos? It would be more than impossible to paint plein air while watching a toddler. Have you ever tried gently lifting a small amount of your pigment out of your clouds with a kleenex tissue? Do you ever plan ahead to save your whites so that you don't have to use the white gouache or do you prefer to use the gouche? There are good books on design at the library that might help you plan the placement of your landscape objects. Looks like you have a good start and the fact that you are having so much fun at has to count for something

Whatever you do, don't quit painting.

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Margo5 wrote
on 20 Oct 2009 8:33 PM

Also, Gregory, you do know that Cheap Joe's and Jerry's Artarama both have websites with short video clips on watercolor and other mediums that are free. You may also want to check out www.VirtualArtAcademy.com.

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on 21 Oct 2009 2:46 AM

Yes it is wet into wet mostly except for the ink washes each layer I let dry. I work light to dark and I use the gouache to solidify my lights. I do sometimes mix the transparent colors with gouache but it always dries a different color and that is very challenging while you're in the zone, so to speak, so I try not to do that. I havent seen any good books on watercolor to be honest. I use transparent and opaque pigments.

I do prefer to work from my imagination but it is usually based on something I have seen. I stopped taking photos. The only time I refer to them is for color relationships. I have tried lifting pigment out of clouds but it always looks like that's what you've done. Beside I more often see ultramarine in the shadows of clouds and cerulean in the color of the sky.

I do plan ahaead to save whites but I haven't perfected that so I am forced to prefer the white gouache. lol. I do want to completely eliminate the gouache.

Yes the problem I face with landscape currently is placement where the foreground. middleground and background are not clearly defined. I am working on that. I think if I can nail down my value relationships it would go a long way toward helping to solve that issue.

A couple of things to check out are Erik Tiemens blog http://virtualgouacheland.blogspot.com/ 

As well as  http://nathanfowkes-sketch.blogspot.com/ 

www.wendyartin.com

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on 21 Oct 2009 7:24 PM

I posted a response to this and it didnt show up.

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on 21 Oct 2009 7:32 PM

Let me try this again...

I do use the wet in wet technique and I work light to dark mostly. I do sometimes mix the white gouache with the pigments but I am getting away from that by using the gouache at the end but I even want to get away from that and preserve the lights completely. I paint from my imagination and from life. I dont use photos anymore. Lifting out pigment always looks as if that is what I did.

 

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Margo5 wrote
on 21 Oct 2009 7:56 PM

Gregory, do you have a copy of the latest "Highlights from Master Teachers?" It is available on this website or in bookstores that carry magazines. There are some paintings and information in there that you might find interesting. You may have to "translate" some of the information from oil paints to watercolor, but it might give you some ideas to work with.

As far as lifting out pigments, some are very easy to lift out and others can tend to damage the paper because they are staining (eg. Thalo Blue), especially if you try to rub them off of the paper rather than simply spraying them off the paper.

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on 27 Oct 2009 7:53 PM

 

I overworked this one to death but I still like the composition.

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Paw2 wrote
on 27 Oct 2009 11:30 PM

hi

 number 8 counting from the top down.  It makes me want to know what is ahead where is the light coming from. It pulls you into the painting. very interesting.

Number 9 has movement in the clouds and the ground is stedfast. I like it

number 1 is complete and good but my interest were 8 and 9.

number 2 needs something and I can't put my finger on it maybe a little more in the trees. hold it up to a mirror see if that helps.

number 3 and 4 is a start but looks incomplete again use the mirror to see it differently.

number 6 and 7 are good but nothing special. Dig a little more inside your memory and what are you trying to say. your 8 and 9 have an appeal. it stirs thought in me.

I hope you keep up the good work. paint paint with each one we grow and sometimes we take a few steps back. hahah  don"t ya love the challenge. hahahah      

Have a good evening

Paw

 

 

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on 28 Oct 2009 2:21 AM

Paw, thank you for looking first of all and secondly thank you for a fair and honest critique.  I started with watercolor about 8 months ago and it really is a great challenge. I will continue to paint. And I hope that as I continue that yourself and others are there to provide honest critique. It really helps to push and stretch me.

I wish you all the best

Greg

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Paw2 wrote
on 28 Oct 2009 10:51 AM

Greg, you are very welcome. It helps to get feedback. But you have only started 8 months ago using watercolor? Good for you! it is different isn't it? Try yupo sometime. it is a syntthetic type surface and works very well with watermedia. cheap Joe has it in stock. google yupo. I love it. but i started watercolor on plexiglas so the yupo was easy adaptation. I think it is used more in europe. I am not fond of canvas, I recently am trying mix media on canvas of course part of it is watercolor.    

Okey dokey Greg,  enjoy the adventure of watercolor it will be all up hills and a few valleys but you are doing fab. in such a short time good for you!

Paw

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on 31 Oct 2009 9:07 PM

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on 20 Nov 2009 1:57 AM

 

I did this after watching Bambi with my daughter. Incredible watercolors in that movie.

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Margo5 wrote
on 20 Nov 2009 6:54 AM

Gregory, I really like this one. It is higher key and very fresh -- not the least bit overworked -- good aerial perspective, nice lights and darks, beautiful muted colors.

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on 20 Nov 2009 3:55 PM

Thank you Margo. This was the first time I've ever worked on a consitantly moist surface. My colors handled nicely. Alot more control.

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