Trying out my mechanical pencil. WIP

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on 31 Jul 2014 6:08 PM

W.I.P of what I'm working on at the moment. I bought my first mechanical pencil the other day and wanted to try it out. It's brilliant for sure. I'm working on Bristol Board smooth hense why this drawing lacks in texture at the moment. I'm trying to work on that. Any tip's for that would be great. 

 I'm trying to draw Jack Nicholson, I haven't started on the teeth yet, It's the hardest part for me but I'll give it a go and try to get them quite realistic looking. Any feedback/critique is always appreciated. I will post the finished once it's done. (The drawing is supposed to be when he was younger..)

 

Sarah~ 

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on 31 Jul 2014 8:51 PM

Sarah—

This is looking real good. There is nothing wrong with "smooth". However it can be hard to control at times—especially with subtle facial contours. If you don't know what I mean by that—you will.

You might try bringing the entire drawing through all the stages toward completion at the same time—saving your darkest darks and final blending until last. That way you are working with the total head through the entire drawing process. That is the professional way of working. As it is now, you are completing it area by area.

Next time try working from your own photos. I believe I mentioned that before. Handle it just like you would work on a professional portrait assignment. Also, every drawing does not have to be a finished rendering. Do some that are sketches and some that are not meant to be photo-like renderings.

By the way, some of the light line work below the eye on the left side of the nose is excellent. As a first step, it's a good idea to pull the entire drawing up with lines about that light.

Please do not take my comments as heavy criticism. You have the talent necessary to do outstanding artwork.
Keep up the good work.

Paul

 

 

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on 1 Aug 2014 9:27 AM

Thank you Paul! I'm not sure what you mean by bringing the entire drawing through the stages, I'm not familiar with the stages which is why I just start with one eye and continuing on hoping the proportion is correct. 

I don't have a good camera to take my own photo's at the moment but once I get one I'll definitely follow you up on that.

Thank you for your critique its very much appreciated! I'm never offended by any crit as I need it to help me. Thanks again, Paul! 

 

Here's a little more progress; 

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on 1 Aug 2014 12:27 PM

Sarah—

When I mentioned "bringing the entire drawing  through the stages...", I was referring to "stages" of the drawing. The best way of working is to work with the entire head through each step—or stage—of the drawing's development. This means blocking the entire head in very lightly, carefully refining the entire drawing and then working through the finishing of the drawing, saving your very dark areas and final blending until last. With each one of these steps you should be dealing with the entire drawing—bringing it along as a unit to the next step toward completion. Keep clean paper under your hand at all times to protect the drawing paper.

Some artists—including myself— do the very first stages of a drawing (the roughing in of the head and features) on very thin paper, like tracing paper. This is so the preliminary work can be transferred to the drawing paper and and the rendering stages can begin on clean paper. Even with the preliminary work transferred to the paper, the actual rendering would begin with a light rendering of the entire head area—rather than completing it section by section. As your drawing progresses, it should begin to assume the darker grays and detail—always working with the entire head area.

Study the work of other artists you admire. Check "pencil portraits" in the images of Google and Bing. You should be working with some good drawing books on pencil portraits.

Again, this drawing is coming along very good. Hang in there!

Paul

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on 2 Aug 2014 9:38 AM

Thanks again for the reply Paul,

I have ordered a book on drawing portrait's, I read reviews that state it's a brilliant book so I shall see what it is like when it arrives. Thank you for all the tip's and techniques I shall definitely try them out!

I will post up finished image of the drawing once it's done.

Thanks again,

Sarah

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on 2 Aug 2014 4:14 PM

Okay so i'm done, I didnt spend too much time on it, on the clothing etc. 
The clothing was blury in the photo anyway. 
It actually looks better in person, less..sketchy. 

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