amateur self portrait please share some tips/critics

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sobrion1 wrote
on 18 Feb 2012 11:36 PM

Hi :)

my name is Samantha and i am a self taught high school student interested in getting better at my art, so the picture attached here is of a school assignment that i obviously spent more time n then the teacher intended (not an art class assignment) but it was my first time really playing with oil pastels and i sorta lost control ha-ha

though i really enjoyed myself i am well aware that i have room for improvement, so please any tips or comments/critic is highly appreciated

 

PS: the quote that is in grey-thus blending into the background says "a man who asks is a fool for 5 minutes, a man who doesn't ask is a fool forever" -Chinese proverb

kinda fitting for this post now that i think of it lol


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broombug wrote
on 9 Mar 2012 11:54 PM

Wonderful first try. As a beginner I would recommend taking classes to further develop your gift. Then you could learn how to control proportion, edges, values and color theory. Keep it up.

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on 10 Mar 2012 9:35 AM

Samantha—

You have what appears to be all the basic talent you need. You say you really enjoy doing artwork and you want to improve. In that case, take the first step and start learning every thing you can about drawing. There are a lot of good books on this. Get a couple and use them as work books. Spend time learning the fundamentals. As Michelangelo wrote, ""Drawing constitutes the fountainhead and substance of painting, sculpture and architecture...".  It is the basic discipline from which other skills of the visual arts flow.

With a reasonable amount of talent, much of drawing can be learned. There are principles of drawing that can be taught. However drawing is a skill. Most of the work is learned through practice. You are actually your own best taecher. The more you draw the better you become. There are no secrets to becoming the artist you would like to be.  

Best of luck,
Paul

 

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BettiePages wrote
on 13 Mar 2012 9:15 AM

I really like the colors you used! I'd suggest maybe a book about portrait, with the tips for the distance between the features of the face.. (like, the distance between eyes are an eye, etc) But that's a good beguining!

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http://www.diffuseart.com the free gallery!

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sobrion1 wrote
on 13 Mar 2012 11:07 AM

Thank you for your comment Big Smile

do you have any recomendations as far as books or workshops in the Twin Cities MN area?

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broombug wrote
on 13 Mar 2012 7:41 PM

There are a lot of free or low cost references here at artist daily. From my experience you can spend a lot of money on  videos and books and still learn nothing. I would recommend the resources at artist daily and a local hands on art class for a beginning. There are a lot of free demos on youtube and various places on the internet.

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KatPaints wrote
on 14 Mar 2012 6:47 AM

Hi Samantha,

Here's my advice, take it or leave it. Just keep doing artwork and surround yourself with others. WATCHING other people is a great way to learn. If you were to take any workshops or classes, I would suggest taking a design class. Design classes usually can teach you the most information without getting picky telling you little worthless stuff like how to paint a tree. Depending on where you live, there are pay as you go, life drawing classes. Many will allow teens to join with parental permission. It will only be about $10 with no instruction, but you will be surrounded by others. Other artists can be your best teacher. Avoid judging yourself or comparing yourself to others.

Just keep doing artwork and monitoring your progress.

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on 14 Mar 2012 11:22 AM

Samantha,

You have received a lot of good advice. Believe me, it is best to begin by learning how to draw. Nothing can substitute for the skill of drawing. Drawing is the essential coordination between your hand, your mind and your eye that will allow you to put your ideas on paper and share them them with others. 

You asked if I could suggest a few good books for you to begin with. There are quite a number of good books on drawing available at Amazon.com  Some of these are quite reasonable. You might look at "Drawing for the Absolute Beginner" ,  "Drawing the Human Head" by Burne Hogarth and "Draw Real People" by Lee Hamond. All of these books are about $15 or less. If you want to be an artist start drawing.
There are artists all over the place who are less than they could be because they lack this basic skill, drawing. 
Paul Sullivan
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sobrion1 wrote
on 14 Mar 2012 4:39 PM

wow thanks for all the awesome tips!! I really am thankful for all the new reasources that you've all told me about :) i have a new sketch i am going to post soon, please anymore critic is always accepted, encouraged, and appreciated

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