Drawing - part of the ride or the destination for you?

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Robin11 Big Smile [:D] wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 7:31 AM

I'm wondering how you view the act of drawing?

For some of us, our final piece is a drawing.  For others, it's the base from which we paint.  For others, drawing is our daily fitness routine to keep skills up to do what we really want to get to.

Were finished drawings the stepping stone from which you leaped into another medium?

Do you find a drawing is harder to execute beautifully than painting?  Is it as expressive?

Just curious!

Robin

 

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j.b2 wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 8:19 AM

It is for me part of the ride and also a destination.

Under all of my paintings there is a drawing, sometimes more abstract than the finished painting. there are times when it shows through..

Then there are the underpaintings that I leave as finished. I find those very interesting. I also draw to draw. My lack of time this fall has not allowed me to post much of anything. I am working on changing that... 

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Margo5 wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 11:37 AM

Robin, I started off with drawing, but am so drawn to color that I had to get my hands on a paint brush. I have finally gotten my studio and have just set up my easel so it should be easier to get back to my drawing. To some extent I do drawing with my paint brush by drawing a simple line drawing in pencil and then sculpting out the rest with paint. For now, I work mainly from photos because I am not very good at getting the "arabesque" onto paper without help from my computer, but some of my paintings are just from line drawings that I have done freehand (you can probably tell which are which just by looking). One painting that I have been working on lately is on mat board. Our teacher gave us a piece of pre-cut mat board and told us we had to gesso it and come up with a painting in watercolor. That has been fun because you had to kind of sculpt out texture on the paper and go from there.

Probably, everybody is different and many of us probably take a different approach with each painting.

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Robin11 wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 3:09 PM

JB, that's cool, it really is part of the ride and destination for you.  I think painting and drawing are very different and it's neat to go back and forth between the two, you learn something from each of them.

Margo, your class sounds so cool!  The love of color AND drawing got me in tight with colored pencil.   It's my favorite medium.  I like to paint, too, but there's something about cps and the easy way to combine the two that I really love.

It's really interesting to hear other artists' thoughts!  Who's next? 

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Ann Nemcosky wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 6:52 PM

This is an interesting topic. I would have to answer that drawing is both, sometimes for the practice of seeing, sometimes just to draw, and sometimes it's the final product. I agree that drawing and painting are very different. I started out as a painter, with drawing only being an exercise. For me, painting is a very active process while drawing is more meditative. They do complement eact other though, and it is nice to go back and forth from one to the other. I find working in each media influences my work in the other.

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j.b2 wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 8:47 PM

Margo, try massing in the head and then wiping out the areas of light with a paper towel.

Then add the shadows. Three values..

That's how I start most paintings...

Robin, to me drawing & painting are two different things.

Painting is closer to scutpture..

And drawing is..I'm not sure what to compair it to, umm..drawing...

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Margo5 wrote
on 5 Nov 2009 10:20 PM

j. b, do you paint with oils? I use watercolors, but I find that if you make adjustments for the type of medium you use the same principles seem to work well for all the different mediums. Thanks to you and Robin both for the information. It seems to me that you can kind of sculpt with drawing if you tone the paper first. To me, both painting and drawing involve a certain push and pull to them.

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j.b2 wrote
on 6 Nov 2009 5:35 AM

Oils, opps.

The watercolorists I have watched have all used a light pencil line to start,  then with a flat brush they mixed a color and put it down. That's about all I know about watercolor, which isn't much..

I keep saying that I'll give it a try and haven't yet...

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Robin11 wrote
on 6 Nov 2009 8:11 AM

Margo, I think watercolor is VERY HARD to learn! 

J.B.,  there's drawing and there's drawing, though.  Some drawings convey a lot of depth, like a one color painting.  But others are lines.  So they CAN be sculpturey, don't you think?

And colored pencil can be very painterly but most ppl still consider it drawing.  But the way I work isn't what most people think of when they talk about a drawing.

Ann, love your avatar!  I find there's a meditative aspect to drawing, too.  My life drawing classes have helped me see better which helps in all my art.  Also helps me with confidence.  I CAN do this, I'm doing it in front of other people, etc.  Being hidden in a home studio can sometimes be a crutch!

Neat discussion!  Looking forward to more thoughts!  Robin

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Margo5 wrote
on 6 Nov 2009 9:55 AM

j.b, that is pretty much how the watercolor starts out. The sculpting part comes in when you lay down exactly the right value of a color and later go back in and lift out etc. If you do it right, you can use color as a value in itself (I am still trying to get a real grasp on that). You should try watercolor unless you don't like the thrill of watching the paint take off and do its own thing. Obviously you don't always want it to do that. You have to learn when and how to control it, but I love the way colors will play with each other on the paper (wet-into-wet).

I love the way oil paintings look and maybe someday I will try an oil or acrylic; however, I really like the ease of clean-up for watercolor.

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Margo5 wrote
on 6 Nov 2009 10:56 AM

Robin, I tried to answer this and the internet ate it up. I agree that colored pencil and pastels both can result in amazingly gorgeous paintings and some drawings capture values and nuances so completely that they look more like paintings.

Watercolor is so thrilling if you like color and like to experiment. I love watching the colors almost literally play with each other when you drop them in wet-in-wet. You do have to learn to control the amount of water and pigment, and you have to learn when to use transparent, semi-opaque, and opaque.

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Margo5 wrote
on 6 Nov 2009 10:57 AM

Ann, I agree with Robin; your avatar is very nice.

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j.b2 wrote
on 7 Nov 2009 2:40 PM

Oh yes, there are a lot of drawings that are very sculptural. I think of oils that way and never really thought about drawing in that way. You may have changed the way I draw, time will tell.

I watched a watercolor demo a few months back and it looked interesting. The painter was very skilled as he made it look easy. I wanted to try it, but just haven’t. But that will happen in the near future I think. I did try a flat brush with oils & never adjusted to them. I'm a filbert painter. Painting with a hazelnut is a lot of work!!

There are a lot of watercolorists that just knock me over. How did they do that???

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Robin11 wrote
on 7 Nov 2009 8:03 PM

JB, the good ones always make it look easy, don't they? :)

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on 8 Nov 2009 3:02 AM

I think of drawing as a finished work of art. When I draw I am really painting with a pencil and when I am painting I am drawing with a paintbrush. So for me I think of it as finished. However, when working out an idea, drawing becomes a method of thinking an idea out which is something I never do with paint. When I look at drawings I see how an artist is plotting the course to the destination. That is something I dont want to show up in a painting though.

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