How to keep oils on palette alive longer?

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on 20 Aug 2014 11:40 AM

Hello,

 

I have noticed that the oil paints today dry much faster on my palette than the oils I used 20 plus years ago.   I used to put out a blob of paint and it would usable for a much longer period of time, even if it skinned over.  Has anyone else noticed this and any idea why?

I am using Gamblin and Winsor Newton brands. Twenty years ago I used Winsor Newton and Winton.

Please share how do you keep your paints fresh and usable for a longer period of time.   

 

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on 21 Aug 2014 12:46 PM

There are a few things I do to keep my oils from drying fast. Use a shallow plastic container the size of your palette paper and place moist sponges on the bottom, once you add your palette paper or wax paper on top the paints will stay wet longer. Try and cover your paints up (air tight is the best) in your container when not using them. If your roommates/spouse doesn't mind, store your palette in the refrigerator. I keep a mini fridge in my studio for palette storage. The last technique is to add a drop of mineral sprits to the top of each color or a drop of water if it is water based.  

Hope this helped or gave you some ideas!

 

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patrickart wrote
on 28 Aug 2014 12:50 PM

press and seal wrap. and put your pallet in the frig.

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on 6 Sep 2014 3:33 PM

Because of the $preciousnes$ of good oil paint, I simply use it very sparingly - putting out only what I might use within a two day period.  I have heard people say you can immerse your oils in water, too (?!), but I am concerned with too much cold changing the chemistry of them . . . I always fret if there is a lot of color left over, and they do of course oxidize even over a 2-day period.  Conservation is my solution.

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on 9 Sep 2014 10:30 AM

Hello,

Regarding my question posted on 8/20/14, on keeping paints alive longer, this is what I gathered from my research:

As most of us know by now you can  seal them with plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze them. I use inexpensive white plastic ice trays as my holding tray for extra paints and put them in a large Zip-Lock bag.   I found this method worked pretty well, but my paints did change texture after a month or so. 

So I will  trying oil of clove as a retarder.  Of what I read  years back, and learned from the rep at Gamblin paints, it should help.  This is what he shared with me regarding clove oil:   

"Clove oil retards the drying time of the oil by evaporating into the airspace inside the covered palette.  This concentration of evaporated clove oil makes it more difficult for the oil paint to borrow oxygen molecules out of the air (oxidation=drying).  The once the palette is opened, the clove oil escapes and the paint used should dry at its usual rate on the canvas."

Finding clove oil was not easy... it  used to be found in old-style pharmacies, but is rarely found in CVS- type pharmacies.  I did find it on Amazon for a reasonable price.  I will be trying the clove oil this week and will post my results.   

 

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rguetre wrote
on 20 Sep 2014 2:12 AM

carol cottone-Kolthoff:

Hello,

 

I have noticed that the oil paints today dry much faster on my palette than the oils I used 20 plus years ago.   I used to put out a blob of paint and it would usable for a much longer period of time, even if it skinned over.  Has anyone else noticed this and any idea why?

I am using Gamblin and Winsor Newton brands. Twenty years ago I used Winsor Newton and Winton.

Please share how do you keep your paints fresh and usable for a longer period of time.   

 

 

http://www.nitpickyartist.com/clove-oil-to-slow-drying.html

 

you can get clove oil at health food stores or at any east indian foods store

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asimpson123 wrote
on 18 Nov 2014 10:02 PM

Having just read your post, there is another way to store/use your oil paints.  I use Masterson palettes, found in most art supply stores and online. It is rectangular with a blue lid.  Also, I use a piece of glass inside instead of palette paper.  The paper absorbs oil out of the paints, the glass does not.  Most people don't like mixing on the glass, but I found it works well.  Also, clean up is just using a paint scraper, not tearing off a sheet each time.  Because the lid seals tightly, you can place the whole container in the fridge, but it is not freezer proof.  Freezing paints works well, but only for a couple weeks, much more seems to still dry them out. 

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asimpson123 wrote
on 18 Nov 2014 10:03 PM

Having just read your post, there is another way to store/use your oil paints.  I use Masterson palettes, found in most art supply stores and online. It is rectangular with a blue lid.  Also, I use a piece of glass inside instead of palette paper.  The paper absorbs oil out of the paints, the glass does not.  Most people don't like mixing on the glass, but I found it works well.  Also, clean up is just using a paint scraper, not tearing off a sheet each time.  Because the lid seals tightly, you can place the whole container in the fridge, but it is not freezer proof.  Freezing paints works well, but only for a couple weeks, much more seems to still dry them out. 

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on 20 Nov 2014 2:00 PM

Hello...thanks for the suggestion on the glass vs. the paper palette.  I have used the waxed paper palette, but I assume it could absorb just the same. 

And I did notice you cannot freeze the paints after a month.  Just like a steak, after being frozen too long, it seems to get a kind of "freezer-burn ".

Had you tried the oil of clove yet? 

Best,

 

Carol Cottone

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