Logo Design for Illustration and Videography Business

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slynch1 wrote
on 19 Aug 2014 12:11 PM

Looking for feedback on a logo design for an Illustration and Videography business

Logo: Origami Hummingbird

Is it apparent what the logo is supposed to be?

What are your initial thoughts of this logo?

Still need to work on text...left out name of business.

JPEG Image does not represent the best quality.

Thanks!

 

 

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on 21 Aug 2014 12:52 PM

Slynch—

You mentioned that the name of the business has been left out. What ever it is, the name should be an integral part of your total signature. The name may justify the use of an origami hummingbird. However, I am not sure how this relates to your business. As an isolated design it is not an obvious symbol for the practice of "videography / illustration". Keep in mind that even an abstract design can work as a logo with enough exposure. However it takes a lot of exposure to establish a visual relationship between a design and a business. Make the design distinctive enough and it may still work. I'm sure you are familiar with some of the bizarre logos used by art studios.

You asked if it was apparent what the logo was supposed to be. I think it is obvious that it is a hummingbird. The origami concept may be lost because the fold effect may be taken as part of the stylization of the bird.

Here's something to keep in mind when designing a logo: Design it in solid black—even though you may eventually print it in a second color.  This means that your design will be simpler and have more impact—and will be easier to recall. When you make your design roughs work in pencil. Pick out the ones that work and refine them with a black sharpie. Stay away from the computer until you have several black sharpie roughs—then work in Illustrator or some other point oriented application.

Through my career, I have designed hundreds of logos professionally for everything from steel companies and hospitals to government defense projects. The best advise I can give you is keep it simple.

Paul

 

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slynch1 wrote
on 3 Sep 2014 10:15 AM

Hi Paul,

Thank you for providing this extensive feedback. These tips will definitely help us to create a better logo. The hummingbird was my first real attempt at a logo and feedback.

We are currently working through new ideas. It is challenging to think of logo ideas that will represent both videography and illustration....I suppose we are going more after "creativity" and "collaboration"....more branding as a publisher rather than two distinct videographers and illustrators.

We still have a lot of time left for planning and I'll definitely use this site again for feedback.

Hope you have a great week!

 

Shea

 

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on 3 Sep 2014 10:36 AM

Shea—

When you have a group of pencil or "Sharpie" roughs, I'll be happy to offer my thoughts. You are right, logos are very challenging.

I think your thoughts on the general direction of your design are good. Keep in mind that your logo does not have to somehow explain what you do. The design can work off of the name of the company. Think of airline logos. Some refer to flight and some are beautiful designs based on initials.

Have fun. Make a lot of roughs. If you are interested in my thoughts on your roughs, just let me know.

Paul

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slynch1 wrote
on 3 Sep 2014 11:43 AM

Thank you Paul, we will continue work on ideas and I will definitely reach out to you for feedback.

 

Shea

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slynch1 wrote
on 20 Sep 2014 9:09 PM

Hi Paul,

 

Just reaching out again to show you some more ideas we had for logos. We moved away from the hummingbird and playing with the lettering and also new logo ideas.

 

My fiance and I work better with creating thumb nails in photoshop and started by drawing them.

The business is Lynch Videography and Illustration, specializing in digital illustrations, painting for publications (magazine covers) and video for web.

Just let me know your quick thoughts on these ideas and we will focus on one project. Thank you for your help!

 

This would be a line drawing of a tree with a tire swing. We are thinking of either having a solid background square like above or have a white background with the leaves colored to be like Fall.

 

 

We were going to play with line thickness for the puzzle pieces. Also the text is just a placeholder. Maybe having all the puzzle pieces be blue with the gradient  would make it better.

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on 21 Sep 2014 1:31 PM

slynch1—

You aren't going to like this.

You have yet to hit on a good solution. This is not uncommon. I have developed as many as 20 or 30 designs before reaching something that works. Remember to keep these in the rough stage at this point—preferably sketched by hand with pencil and/or "Sharpies". Why? Because computer "roughs" can be very finished looking even though they don't really have any merit. In other words, they can fool you during the development stage.

Remember—these things have to work in nothing but BLACK & WHITE to be a strong logo design. The color comes AFTER you have a strong concept. They have to be able to be reduced and still have impact. You are ignoring these important points. Keep this work strictly at the concept-level at this stage. Do you folks have publications and books on modern logo design? Logos work with the simplest of design elements, yet they have a language and style of their own.

Regardless, I'll comment on these:

•  The tree, as a fully rendered tree, becomes a rather generic element. Does this have a relationship to the business I do not understand? Can this work as a more symbolic tree with half of the tree made of the ones and zeros of digital code and half as a stylized tree? As it is, it could be anything. The comparison between digital code and reality has been done before but there may be room for additional thought. I'm not suggesting this—just mentioning it in passing.

•  I like the large name as a starter but the rest of it falls flat. It is relying on complicated color and abstract design. "Doing something" with the characters is a good design premise but this is not saying anything.

•  No mater what Fonts.com might say, brush italic lettering went out in 1958. However the general look of this thing has some merit. One good thing is the large name and the way you have handled the "videography / illustration". Here again the design relies on color to make it work. This may not seem that big a deal to you. However a logo that can work in one color is that much stronger as a design—and that much more versatile. Also, this splash stroke is well done but doesn't it refer to the painted illustration side of the business with the exclusion of digital media and video side? What would happen if that same splash started out (in the upper left of the shape) as large pixels that did a simple morph into the paint splash shape (at the lower right)? You might try this against a white background in nothing but B&W—letting the overlap on the "L" reverse at that point. (A color version could be more involved yet be the same design.) If that whole thing works, I would try enlarging it in relation to the name.

• Puzzle concepts are all over the place. This has been done too often. But here is an off beat suggestion—you might make puzzle-opening shapes out of parts of the LYNCH name— with a couple of puzzle pieces above and below.

I hope this helps —
Next time, lets see black and white hand-drawn roughs. I don't care how crude they may be. Drawing roughs by hand makes you think. Lets see how many ideas you can come up with.

Paul

 

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slynch1 wrote
on 21 Sep 2014 5:55 PM

Thanks Paul!

We will continue to work on these ideas. Your feedback is very helpful to us.

We will keep in touch

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on 21 Sep 2014 7:18 PM

slynch1—

I'll be happy to offer all the help you want. I know my comments are blunt but I am talking to you two as fellow professionals.

The 1960s and early 70s were the hey day of logo design. This was before the computer came on the scene. However, a lot of designers used to refuse logo assignments. Logos were difficult to design for a lot of reasons and many designers saw them as a good way to loose money. Now with with the aid of computer applications like Adobe Illustrator, a lot of bad logo designs can be cranked out fast. But the heart of a good logo is its concept—its unique relationship to the entity it represents. 

There are only so many fresh ideas you can come up during an idea session. During an idea session try to record the roughest, quickest version of a design idea. Then go on to the next thought. After a time lapse, follow your idea session up with a development session. During the development sessions, refine your quick idea notes. These should still be rough (and black and white) but they should refine your earlier rough concepts. Later, follow this up with another idea session and later, another development session. Two people can work at the same time but each should be working alone. Very few good ideas come from group sessions.

Best of luck—
Paul

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slynch1 wrote
on 22 Sep 2014 8:22 PM

Hey Paul, just wanted to share with you some concepts we came up with for the paint brush / pixel idea. We both felt this was a good idea to continue working on.


Here are a couple thumb nails. We are continuing to work on other ideas as well but thought minds well give it a shot.

3113.Scan 1.tiff

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on 22 Sep 2014 9:18 PM

Slynch1—

This is a good look for raw idea work. Is this your "rough thinking" on a modification of the paint splash concept (the one with the brush italic lettering)—for a pixel / paint splash?  Or are you thinking of a brush image that starts out in pixels but morphs into a stylized brush?

A note of caution— someone has a pencil design that starts out as pixels and then switches into a real looking pencil. Chances are someone has a brush that does something similar. However, I always feel that there is room for variations on a general concept of this nature.

I'd suggest that you work on the development of the splash. I agree that it has a lot of merit. I would suggest that the splash start out as a simple ragged "swipe" shape made of pixels (at the upper left) then becoming the irregular paint splash (at the lower right of the total shape). During the development stage, it's good to start a design off in pencil, finishing and refining it in black "Sharpie". Try variations of the same design idea.This stuff should still be rough.

Here is my email address:   sully1251@cox.net

Feel free to send any of this sort of "idea / comment" exchange and any sketches via email—

Good luck and have fun—
Paul

 

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slynch1 wrote
on 22 Sep 2014 9:45 PM

Most of these thumbnails are for designs for a pixel/paint splash. I did explore a paint brush /pixel concept in number 1.

I will certainly e-mail you my progress. I will enjoy working on the pixel/splash idea as I think it marries both illustration and videography quite well.

I will reconnect soon

Shea

 

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on 23 Sep 2014 11:50 AM

Shea—

Sounds good.

PS

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