Advise on this painting please..

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kristiekoz wrote
on 16 Jul 2014 9:06 PM

I am about half-way done with this painting. I am still putting a large tree and a silhouette of a Field Spaniel in the front/ foreground. My concern is that the outer edge (red/maroon color) is too dark. I really want to lighten it or change it somehow! I'm pretty sure there isn't much i can do without making it milky. If anyone has an idea before i proceed with finishing it I would very much appreciate it. Hmm

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on 17 Jul 2014 7:23 AM

If you take azo orange, my first choice, or any orange, or a light yellow, perhaps yellow oxide, very watered down and glaze the colour over your maroon as many times as you feel is necessary to lighten your maroon, should work quite well.  You may need to apply, let dry, a dozen times with a very watered down orange.  You could play with the water/paint proportions.  

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kristiekoz wrote
on 17 Jul 2014 10:07 AM

Hmmmm, I guess i'm afraid if i go over it in any way the two edges where the orange/yellow and maroon meet there will be a noticeable jump of new paint vs old (if that makes sense). Very good idea Valerie, i'm afraid though! Haha :P.

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on 17 Jul 2014 3:02 PM

Try an exercise on a piece so paper:  paint the dominant colours you have used in your painting yellow/orange, maroon touching each other, about a four to six inch square with the two colours.  Let dry.  Now water down an orange colour with quite a bit of water, then with a soft brush paint over part of your maroon, do it several times to see how it goes.  Do you see a marked line in the maroon or does it just appear altered.  Does this area next to the yellow/orange look very different or just altered.  I' m not suggesting you try this on your painting if you don't feel comfortable.  It's an exercise for you to feel comfortable with your paints, and to see how you can lighten something slightly.  You can also do this to darken an area.  You can go over large areas with watered down white to lightened the whole area, ie, if something is too dark.  You can, as I mentioned before alter the amount of water you use in this glazing technique.  I know only to well the fear of messing something up.   Having tried various things over the years with acrylics, it doesn't bother me now to try something because I know I can go back in and and fix it up, even though the process can be frustrating.  Although I have been known to say "why didn't I leave well enough alone" fairly often, when I've solved the problem, it adds to my confidence.  In any case, you don't want to go through every painting you do feeling fearful that you will mess something up - you want to gain confidence in the painting material you have chosen to use.  

 

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