thoughts please on potrait drawing please?

This post has 6 Replies | 2 Followers
Not Ranked
Posts 4
Points 110
faith678 wrote
on 10 Jul 2014 3:29 PM

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 547
Points 4,585
on 10 Jul 2014 8:33 PM

Faith—

I think this is excellent. This is very, very good work. Your job from here on is to stick with it. Draw every chance you have.

You have the talent that you need to do truly outstanding work. The rest is up to you. You learn to draw by drawing. Every drawing is a step along the way to making everything you can out of the talent you have. This learning process is a life-long journey.

When you post your work for our comments, it is always a help to mention any training you may have had. This helps all of us in making meaningful comments and suggestions. I'm sure we would all like to see more of your work.

Hang in there—and keep up the fine work.
Paul

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 4
Points 110
faith678 wrote
on 11 Jul 2014 2:00 AM

Thanks for the feedback :) I have had no training atall im just self taught, I want to draw more photorealistic,  do u know what drawing tools I would need for that? Thanks :) xx

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 547
Points 4,585
on 11 Jul 2014 12:09 PM

Faith—

You are doing wonderful for being self taught. I'm sure you want to start making finished portraits right now. However, I am going to suggest that you put youself through a training course of your own. Get a couple of good books on drawing heads and hands and also on pencil portraits. Use these as work books. Study the structure of facial features and the construction of the head.

Also, study the work of successful artists who work with pencil. Some artists work with an almost photo-like smooth blend—while others accomplish powerful portraits with more of a drawn-line technique. On Google images, check the work of Rajacenna and also, Paul Calle for starters. They are artists who work in the two different methods I just mentioned. Also, Google "pencil portraits" under images. There is a wealth of material for you to study there.

As far as the materials that you need: I would suggest that you stay with pencils—probably HB, 2B, 4B and 6B. While you are studying facial anatomy, all you need is a soft house pencil or HB. Be sure you have a kneaded eraser. It's the pencil artist''s best friend. Regarding the paper you need for studying with books, all you need is coping paper. For more finished drawings, check you local art supply store for a good quality drawing paper in pad form. Eventually you will want to experiment will different kinds of paper. A hard finish can give interesting results. As you get more into this you may want to start doing your preliminary work on tracing tissue and transfer it to your drawing paper for the final rendering.

You learn to draw by drawing—

Paul

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 4
Points 110
faith678 wrote
on 11 Jul 2014 1:29 PM

Thanks very much will do as you have said, do you think I have the skills to go far if I keep learning? X

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 547
Points 4,585
on 11 Jul 2014 2:11 PM

Faith—

I believe that much of drawing can be learned. As I have mentioned, it looks like you have a lot of talent. The rest is up to you. Drawing is a unique coordination between your brain, your sight and your hand. That is the physical part. This takes dedication— time, practice and study. It is truly a life-long process of learning. You want to reach the point that drawing is second nature for you. You want to be able to "see" the image on the paper before you draw it.

The first step is learning the anatomy of the head and its features. Know it. Understand it. For a portrait artist, this is your ABCs. Always remember that you learn to draw by drawing. Working with books is a tremendous help. Studying other artist's work is a big help.

I suggested to another member that he get a large piece of thin poster board and fold it in half to use as a folder for drawings. Keep all your major drawings and date them. With effort, you will see a lot of improvement over a reasonable period of time.

Keep drawing—
Paul

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Posts 12
Points 195
on 12 Jul 2014 2:18 PM

Very nice piece, you are very good at proportions I see. The only critique I can give is the left eye is a little more round...open...the right one is spot on. Oh and remember the reflections in the eyes, it makes the eye look much more realistic and wet. The nose is perfect (I find noses to be the most difficult) More detail could be given to the clothes and hair ; faces need to be soft like you have done, but clothes need more strict detailing. The whole piece is a bit middle grey and I would suggest to go deeper on your shadows and be sure those highlights are nice and clean, it makes for a much more bold and 3d work. Great job - you are well on your way to photorealism!

I noticed you asked what materials to use, me personally (I was a portrait artist for many years as well) I loved to use just regular everyday materials...mechanical pencils and ball point pens (try shading with a ball point pen, many people never think of using it but it can produce amazing results)...when it comes to color I go for prisma colors and gauche paints. Normal paper can not compare to a good quality drawing pad though...I like to make sure my paper is decently thick and very smooth. I also see other artists on deviant art use colored paper and it gives a really nice finished and professional look, even when the piece is not "finished"

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (7 items) | RSS