The Health Plan

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on 12 Oct 2009 6:16 AM

Health care is both a profession and a business.  Managing both effectively requires good ethics.  Credat Emptor means let the buyer have faith or credence.  In regards to health care, it means let the patient have faith in knowing that the physician will do what's in the best interest of the patient and not the professional.  Firstly, too many professionals/hospitals/attorneys do not want to leave money on the table.  If a service is provided and covered, then physicians are apt to order that diagnostic test or service.  Secondly, we live in a highly litigious society, and medical/legal responsibility is of primary concern.  No physician wants to go through the emotional drain of a lawsuit; hence, diagnostic tests are ordered to protect both the physician and the patient.  However complex and/or inadequate people believe our health care system is, you find the same issues with integrity and ethics, or lack thereof, in every profession, including government.  

Admittedly, our health care system needs refining, no argument there.  Whatever your opinion is, contact your local and state representatives.  You're voice is heard and speaks volumes for your country.

 

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Kisu wrote
on 6 Nov 2009 7:01 AM

Lili Anne Laurin:

I think the discussion we are having here is very important but I hope that all of you are also directing your passions and concerns about reforming the healthcare in this country by writing your representatives in government. Did you know that for every person who writes their congressman, senator etc about an issue, the politicians calculate that the one writer represents 9 other people with the same views. So your voice is amplified by the power of 10! 

This is so important.  I've also been calling their offices, even if I'm not one of their constituents.  The issue is too big and too important, and they need to hear from a cross section of Americans.  The media focuses only on the loudest, shrillest voices, so the sane, quiet majority has to make an extra effort to make ourselves heard.

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Robin11 wrote
on 10 Nov 2009 9:30 AM

My doc says this current bill will literally cause him to close his practice if passed.  YIKES!

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on 10 Nov 2009 10:26 AM

Wow. Did your doctor say why?

I'm a retired federal employee.  At least one of the plans being proposed is based on the health care benefit available to feds.  It's really quite excellent, which tends to put me on the pro side of the debate.  We have lots of choices and can pick among multiple plans depending on costs and our particular needs.

 

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Robin11 wrote
on 10 Nov 2009 11:31 AM

He said Medicare was already slashing what he could be paid by so much and that this health plan would do the same.  He said he has to charge to cover his overhead and support his family and can't even imagine how the young docs with school loans are doing.

He said Medicare denies payment for defensive medicine tests, he has to order tests all at once, rather than one at a time, see if this is it, etc., to protect himself from lawyers, but Medicare won't pay for them that way.  But if he doesn't do all the tests at once, he is opening himself up to being sued.  His malpractice insurance is astronomical and he has not even been sued (but is sure it's a matter of time, all doctors are getting sued frivilously and the insurance companies just settle and jack up the prices even higher) And this bill doesn't address this problem.

We already have lost a lot of doctors to other states because of the feeding frenzy of lawyers here.  It takes months ... and I mean months ... to get a gyn appt.

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on 10 Nov 2009 6:14 PM

I I've closely monitored this proposed health care reform.  There are many complexities to health care, one of which is tort reform.  Tort reform is limiting the circumstances under which injured people may sue and/or limit the amount of money a jury can award.  Without tort reform, it's just another staggering bill for Americans to cover.

As a board certified physician, I can tell you that first hand how difficult it will be for patients; long waits, limited care and exorbitant costs for everyone.  I've practiced for 22 years and as it stands now, I don't know how my practice will survive more cost cuts in reimbursements.  With limited reimbursements and percentage write offs,  it will be impractical to continue after paying malpractice insurance, business overhead including staff wages, utilities, taxes and state fees on x-ray equipment, etc.

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KatPaints wrote
on 31 Dec 2010 8:58 AM

I realize that this is an old post, but it is still relevant. I can't help but feel that this is one of the main reasons I am tied to my job. I really dislike the way society is set up so that becoming dependent on a company, insurance, government, etc. ..... is so easy and seemingly necessary. I unfortunately must have health care. Without it, I'm at high risk. It's a dilemma. I met someone on the internet who has Cancer in the UK, fortunately with their health care system, he has no stress about going broke, not having enough money to pay for bills, not to mention the red tape and stress of excessive paperwork. He moved to a more relaxing location, so he could enjoy retirement and the ocean. Imagine happily moving to a better location while you are ill/in recovery. Almost shocking and unthinkable in the US. The more likely scenario would be selling your house to pay medical bills and living in a low end apartment.

Anyone know of good self-employment health insurance for someone with pre-existing conditions?

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TJS1358 wrote
on 25 Jun 2012 12:22 PM

I know this is an old post. Hopefully Kat you will get this.  If you are truly considered 'high risk', many states have high risk pools for insurance that is extremely affordable that many people are not aware of. I have multiple sclerosis so the health care debate was an important one for me.  Check with your state. This may help:-)  

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KatPaints wrote
on 25 Jun 2012 4:57 PM

Thank you for your response. Fortunately, I am not high risk in the same way you are. I'm more likely to develop cardiac issues and joint problems.  I had a procedure this past Fall which makes me feel more reassured about my health. I decided the best I can do is hope to retire early and keep pursuing my art right now. Best of luck to you.

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Jay Babina wrote
on 2 Jul 2012 8:45 AM

The GOP had teams of lawyers ready to combat the plan before the ink was dry for no other reason than to uphold their promise to not let anything Obama does pass. November is the time you can voice your opinion for real. I worked for myself as a graphic designer for years and was getting killed by health insurance. I kept upping my deductible and they kept upping my premiums. I'm now on SS and finally feel some relief because of Medicare which the morons wanted to kill until they found out how bad politically it would be.

 

Why don't they just learn to paint. But then again, they would probably try to find out who is selling the most paints and invest in them and create intentional shortages.

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AnnMarieArts wrote
on 13 Jul 2012 8:39 PM

Thanks for asking, and I think some people just try to make a stink out of anything. Any president, or anything new that people are indifferent to, will be hated by someone. I just think of it this way. It's true that not everyone can be please with some things, such as this. It's defiantly great for people who can afford it, and people who have conditions who are now covered. It's great to know I'm still covered because Obamacare passed. If my dad's company didn't provide it for the employees, then my brother and I wouldn't have any health care. I think it's pretty terrible that huge billion dollar corporations are refusing to give healthcare benefits to their employees. My cousin's boyfriend worked at Walmart and he made only $7.50 an hour, with NO healthcare benefits at all. He got a new job that pays him $10,  plus provides healthcare for him. To my understanding, if your company provides health care insurance for you, then you don't have to pay for it yourself. If your company doesn't provide it, then you have to pay for it, or else you get some penalty for it. The biggest con is getting fined for not paying for the health insurance. Otherwise, there are many people who are benefited by it, especially people who preexisting conditions

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AnnMarieArts wrote
on 13 Jul 2012 8:41 PM

Well, I'm glad you got your Medicare. I feel bad for people who suffer under the GOP. All they do is want to help billionaire corporations. Pretty much everyone else are lazy and don't deserve anything, according to them. 

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KatPaints wrote
on 14 Jul 2012 6:10 AM

Now that we have heard plenty of complaints, LET'S GET BACK ON TOPIC! What options are available to people who want to be self-employed artists? What options are available to people who want to retire early? What are the current options available?

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on 8 Jun 2013 12:43 AM

Insurance is very important. It is now getting compulsory sort of thing. Whether it is an auto insurance or life insurance, every insurance services makes it possible for you to ensure protection for your family/things in terms of finances.

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