Give me your best advice!! I'm still learning!!!

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Msblueeyes wrote
on 13 Mar 2014 11:59 AM

I posted a picture of a rose I drew on here a while back, and people gave me some great advice! I tried to channel all of that into this flower drawing, again, I'm only 13 and I'm self taught, I would like as much advice as possible. Thank you! <3 I really hope to be good at realism one day..

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ALatorre wrote
on 23 Mar 2014 10:58 PM

I like everything about this, the way the leaves bend and fold, the flower, all of it is nice...a kneaded eraser is always a good tool to have to keep some of the unnecessary smudges off as a final touch... keep on drawing 

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Msblueeyes wrote
on 24 Mar 2014 10:33 AM

Thank you! Can a normal eraser work to? 

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on 24 Mar 2014 4:59 PM

Blueeyes—

I like your drawing very much. You show a real sensitivity to the lines and textures of the flower.

You are doing very well for someone 13 and in the process of teaching yourself.  I want to encourage you to draw every chance you have. You are at the age when the time and practice spent learning to draw can truly pay off.

This is the time you should learn the skills of drawing what you see. This means you should be drawing from something—objects from the world around you or fairly large photos from magazines. What you are learning is the coordination of your your hand, your mind and your eyes—the essence of what the skill of drawing is all about. In this sense, drawing is a very much a physical activity that can be improved with practice—just as an athlete improves with practice. This means that many of your drawings, at this stage, will be practice drawings and sketches—rather than finished works of art.

I have suggested that you buy a couple of books on drawing and use them as work books. Practice the lessons in the book just like it is classwork—because that is what it is. All this calls for a lot of discipline. However it will pay off for you. Remember—you learn to draw by drawing.

Paul

ps

Let me answer your eraser question for you—
Yes, other types of erasers can work but a kneaded eraser can be a second tool

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Msblueeyes wrote
on 25 Mar 2014 12:29 AM

I just bought a bunch of books from the library, following the advice you gave me on my last post. :)

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on 25 Mar 2014 12:32 PM

Blueeyes—

You know what to do with the books you have—study them and work with them.
You sound like you have a true passion for art and real desire to develop all the talent you have.

Another way of learning is to make copies of drawings by artists you admire. You can never display them as your own creations because they would not be your original work. However, it is an excellent way to become familiar with the methods of established artists. Think of these "copy drawings" as exercises that you doing. When you do them, you can't help but pick up some advanced techniques and methods of working. Study the work of some of the masters of drawing. You are only 13 but you are not too young to become familiar with the pencil drawings of artists such as Andrew Wyeth.

When you are sketching and drawing, concentrate on size relationships within the drawing. Whatever you are working on, get used to sketching the subject in lightly as a first step. Become familiar with the kneaded eraser. Pull it, stretch it and form it into the shape you need. Or, just stretch it to clean it. Norman Rockwell once said that he did as much drawing with his kneaded eraser as he did with his pencil and charcoal. What he meant was lightening preliminary lines, pulling lighter areas out of areas already rendered, adding high lights and just changing areas.

Visit art supply stores and become familiar with the types of pencils and paper available. If you have a museum or gallery in your area drop in and look around.

If you truly want to be an artist and learn to draw, don't do it half way. Being an artist is a way of life.

Best of luck—

Paul

 

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Msblueeyes wrote
on 25 Mar 2014 9:34 PM

Wow, I never thought of it like that, 'Art is a way of Life'. That really did just open my eyes, I looked up Andrew Wyeth,  Maybe someday with LOTS of practice I can be as good as that. We can only hope! Thank you for commenting on all my posts, I know I don't know you, but I really look forward to the advice you bring! Thanks again, Blue eyes.

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