liquin

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peter_ahart wrote
on 26 Nov 2010 6:11 PM

Looks like a great source for information. Thanks!

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Ownerofphil wrote
on 13 Nov 2011 10:04 PM

hi, i was looking to try liquin but wanted to read up on it and found my way to this place and when I read your post I couldn't help myself i signed up for this website in order to reply to you because i don't think you are right. I'm a college student majoring in painting and I have been told to paint from thin to thick not the other way around. why do you beleive that painting thin to think will cause the paint to crack? because of the medium? i've never used liquin so i do not know.

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Daryl6 wrote
on 14 Nov 2011 5:57 PM

It was awhile back when I first posted this post. Looking into answers about using mediums and painting fat over lean. Meaning fat with oil verses lean of oil, not necessarily paint thickness.

Since then I have experimented with different mediums and found Liquin to be unsuitable or undesirable. It was nice to use a medium, but liquin made all my paint flatten out, and when I paint I enjoy dimension and impasto in my paint.

I am favoring walnut oil now. You may want to say I have gone green. Walnut oil is non toxic, it can be easily used to clean brushesand you will not need turpentine or gamsol anymore. It does not dry out brushes, though I mainly use painting knives. I am enjoying the walnut oil with the dryer, to speed drying time, and it does not yellow my paint colors.

Hope this helps.

I talk about this more in my workshops. See below.


Web: www.DarylUrig.com
Blog: http://darylurig.com/blog/

YouTube Video:
Self-Portrait: http://youtu.be/5DDJ0TwPGz0
Painting Knives: http://youtu.be/WZOwpcxitc8


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Jay Babina wrote
on 22 Nov 2011 8:32 AM

I have no allergic sensitivity to Liquin but I don't like the smell and I have no doubt that the fumes are not good for me. I have to try the Ganblin Walnut Alkyd Medium. I use the Liquin a lot outside for my initial wash lay-ins and on a sunny day, an hour later its tacky enough to not interfere with subsequent layers.  Sometime Titanium white just takes forever to harden up and Liquin always helps. I never use it as a clear coating just as a quick drying medium mixed into the paint and very little.

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Daryl6 wrote
on 29 Nov 2011 11:39 AM

Since I had original posted this topic I have experimented a lot more with mediums and exploring fat over lean. Not to be confused with thick over thin paint. My choices provided a path to what I am considering GOING GREEN. I have chose to eliminate the use of turpentine or Gamsol in favor of using M. Graham Walnut Alkyd Oil Painting Medium or M. Graham Walnut Oil Painting Medium. It is favorable with my paints, they have no odors, even orderless turps still have headache reaching odors for some of my students who have used them.

The Alkyd dries much faster, while the non-Alkyd is very slow drying, both having there own benefits. The Non Alkyd is also used to clean brushes and seems to not dry out the bristles as Gamsol and turpentines do.

You may see some of my paintings on my website DarylUrig.com that include painting with painting knives or brushes. I do enjoy the thick texture of paint. These are also the painting material I use in my worshops.

 

 

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KatPaints wrote
on 30 Nov 2011 5:56 PM

I like liquin. I used it for years when I was younger. Now that I'm getting back in to painting, I find it dries a bit too quickly. At times I think liquin would be good to use, but I was also considering a linseed oil/mineral spirits mix. I was wondering if anyone here has used different mediums or if you stick with one medium. The concern I have is whether the linseed/spirit mix would be more fat than liquin....

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Daryl6 wrote
on 30 Nov 2011 7:52 PM

I have used different percentages of mixes like Damar Varnish, turpentine and Stand oil ( I think I posted this on my blog last year), even just plain stand oil I experimented with briefly. But compared to the buttery feel given by the Alkyd Walnut oil I mentioned above, it is no comparison. The other thing I appreciate about the Walnut oil is that it seem, in my experience, to provide a nice uniform sheen to the painting. I always disliked with the way other mediums would leave some colors looking flat in sheen and other would be more matte or glossy in the same painting. Changing my original color intention.

Hope this helps.

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KatPaints wrote
on 30 Nov 2011 8:52 PM

I would think that the Walnut oil would go "bad" quicker. I also wonder how much Walnut oil has been time tested?

I was wondering if someone here has any paintings say over 20 30 years old with impasto... If it has or hasn't deteriorated in any way could you share what stages of mediums you have used? Thanks

 

I have noticed that many museum paintings with thick impasto were significantly less cracked if the painting is on a rigid surface like wood. I recall the most cracking in many dark areas of the dutch paintings.

 

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peter_ahart wrote
on 1 Dec 2011 7:18 AM

Check out gamblin differnt mediums. The problem with linseed/stand/damar is that it yellows. Gamblin has mediums that dont yellow but are slow drying or fast drying, depends on what you want. They also have information of how to add more oil when your working in layers(fat over lean).

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on 14 Sep 2012 10:35 AM

I have a question about Damvar

 I read some place that we can varnish our painting with Damvar without waiting for the 6 months period of time after the painting is completed. Is this true?

 Also if we painted the painting with the traditional, turpentine, stand oil and varnish layers, can we varnish it with Damvar and how long do we need to wait before applying Damvar?

thanks!Big Smile  

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on 6 Oct 2012 12:17 PM

If you use liquin mixed with your oil paints and you let enough time for drying, there is no problem to use pure oil paint over it, or other layer also mixed with liquin.

If your question is whether you can use a pure liquin layer (with no oi paint mixed) and let it dry and then use more oil paint over it, also it is fine. There is no problem as liquin has more elasticity than other types of glazing mediums, and much more elastic than varnish layer. 

When the area is very small and detailed (eyes, hands)  personally make my own glazing medium: 50% linseed oil and 50% part of varnish, both transparent. Sometimes I add drops of secative to it. I leave liquin for glazing large areas, it is not so good for details. 

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on 28 Dec 2012 10:15 AM

You might wish to try the oil paint medium created specifically for use with "water-miscible" oils, AKA "water-mixable" oils.  They were created in part for people with allergies. I've tested ten mediums thus far from traditional black oil to liquin to water-miscible and found of them all, I LOVE the no-odor, simple clean-up of Holbein Aqua Duo brand Quick Drying Liquid. It's similar to Liquin Light blending and stand oil mixed together. The up or down-side, depending upon your goal, is that Quick Drying Liquid dries firm in four hours. Water-miscible mediums work fantastically with traditional oils in my experience. I use the paints in concert with traditional oils. 
Don't be afraid to try different brands of water-miscibles. They're like color specialties in oils. ONLY Rembrandt brand Cadmium Yellow Light will give you a true, opaque, clean paint. The most expensive W&N, Grumbacher or Oil Holland can't. It's always semi-opaque and to me, slightly dirty. I find that each brand has a color speciality that no other brand matches. Holbein makes the most beautifully clean reds. Winsor & Newton, the best blues. Old Holland, the best earth colors and greens. Use them all!

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siennasue01 wrote
on 11 Jan 2013 10:14 PM

It is my understanding that you can.  I have.

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