Does my Job has potential?

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MaluWorkArts wrote
on 17 Dec 2013 4:02 PM

Hello, I paint for a hobby but I've been pushed by my brother to make it a little more professional and why not make a living out of it. 

So I paint, and I paint a lot, I mostly do acrylic painting on newspaper that I consider my own style (I havent seen something familiar like what I do) 

So I'm here to take any review, advise and why not offer from this community. 

http://instagram.com/maluworkarts 

I do have a lot more of paintings done but I dont want to publish everything ono the same day. 

All Images are ©Copyrighted 

Thanks in advance, 

MALU

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dougworrell wrote
on 4 Jan 2014 3:18 PM

Hello, I saw your paintings and they are lovely and interesting and evoke happiness.

I am a lawyer, and only a beginning artist, but I have been inquiring about how an artist can make money from their work and perhaps a living, because my girlfriend is an artist and an art teacher.  She often does not feel her artwork is good unless some will buy it.  Not true, of course, but still she has that yen for recognition confirmed by the fact that someone values her work enough to write a check.

There are millions of artists and thousands of gallons of paint and watercolor being applied to surfaces weekly.  Trailer truck loads of canvas are manufactured and shipped by the companies that sell such things.

Being good, even unique, is not sufficient for commercial success.

With any business an entrepreneur (and that is what you are or will be) must identify their target market and know what the buyer wants and why they will purchase your product as opposed to the next vender.

There are several approaches to consider; here are only a few examples.

a. Those artists who enjoy considerable commercial success have great skill and talent AND have a gallery or other recognized entity to promote their work.  The buyer's are reasonably wealthy, often view the works as investments, have developed a sense of what they like and may be collectors.

b. There are those who paint portraits (people, loved ones, pets, children, etc.) and get commissions from their local area and sometimes beyond.  Fame is the key to big commissions and a broader audience.  It takes time, and a community of supporters and connections to develop notoriety.

c. Some arts make the rounds of the art fairs, set up their tents or booths and hope for an impulse buy or who knows what motivates the fair goers to purchase.

d. One might select a tourist destination and make a series of paintings of the objects and places at that destination, reproduce them in an inexpensive format and have local shops sell these.  The purchases are for remembrance of the experience the tourist had there.  If the art is really good all the better.  The original carries a big price tag and the prints, Giclee or otherwise, are priced for selling lots.  The print sales generate more profit usually than the one original.

e. Someone designs and paints greeting cards, wallpaper scenes, logos, t-shirts, ornaments, etc. etc.  How much of that work is  now performed by artists in developing nations where labor is inexpensive or on computer.  Once in Puerto Rico I purchases for say $20 a framed painting of a local scene. These were "mass produced" in Mexico though painted by hand and churned out copy after copy.  I still bought it, I was the tourist who wanted a remembrance.  It was not fine art.  How very little the artist must have been paid who actually painted it.  Yet I know of a woman who hand paints Christmas tree ornaments with her own unique characters and they are sold at Neiman Marcus and large Chicago department stores and she get custom orders and requests.

Most artists don't want to subordinate their "art" to the business of art.  Generally, only if you are famous will this notion succeed.  And if it violates your soul, to subordinate your "art" to the business, then don't do it, you will not be happy.

On the other hand you may find a way to flourish, to find a market for the product of your passion, and be happy and have a few coins in your pocket.

I am not writing this to discourage you, but to encourage you to develop a business plan and to search long and think clearly  about how you might make this happen.  Sometimes if you are seeking a way to your goal and talking with others, you will come across a route that will take you to your dream.  Just don't give up your day job until you find it.  It will come slowly and gradually build momentum as you find your way and the market finds you.

God Speed.

doug

 

 

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dougworrell wrote
on 4 Jan 2014 3:35 PM

P.S. One of the resources on this website is an ebook on the business of art.  Look under free eBooks, Art Business, you will find it.

It has some very good advise and tips.

doug

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dougworrell wrote
on 4 Jan 2014 3:36 PM

make that advice.

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Large Coffee wrote
on 18 May 2014 6:12 PM

Thanks so much for the time you put into the advice.  You confirmed some things I was thinking + I learned a few things as well!

 

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