3 Apples still life

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j.b2 wrote
on 11 Apr 2009 7:23 AM

Here is what I've been working on as of late.

3 Apples..

Your C&C is welcome...

 

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j.b2 wrote
on 5 May 2009 4:55 PM

After drying I stretched this one and adjusted the image size in the camera. Then exported it as a smaller j-peg.

This is the 1st in an apple series..

Thanks...

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Robin11 wrote
on 16 May 2009 9:25 AM

Nice job  I love the drama!  Not a still life person but just happened upon this...so please take my one comment with a grain of salt...the verticle dark stroke on the center apple to me is distracting and flattens the apple ... it almost looks like it was dented .. and kinda stopped me in my tracks looking at this.  Which may be what you intended???

At any rate, I do love seeing the bold brushstrokes on the apples and look forward to seeing even more of your work! 

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j.b2 wrote
on 17 May 2009 1:43 PM

Thanks Robin. Comments either way are appricated. Just to let you know there is no green paint from the tube in this painting. Painted without green. Care to guess what 2 colors I mixed on the pallet to get this wounderful green?

I never was a still life person until I started to paint them regularly. You can thank my mentor for getting me hooked..

There was a dent in the apple. Maybe I should have left it out? This painting is the 1st in a series of green apples. I was demo-ing a lone apple when I set these up and decided to run with it. What have I got myself into? I hope to start the next one as soon as I can get to the store and buy a few green apples...

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Robin11 wrote
on 17 May 2009 5:50 PM

Oh, I wouldn't eliminate anything that you mean to do, it does tell the story, doesn't it!!

Well, beside yellow and blue, lol, I don't know WHICH, though, because I paint very little -- my 2 favs are colored pencil and woodcut printmaking!

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j.b2 wrote
on 18 May 2009 5:26 PM

I streached the canvas the other day so it's done as far as I'm concerned.

Not blue & yellow, but raw umber and yellow! It makes the very green of the granny smith apples..

I have always wanted to try wood cut printing. I've done lino cuts and silk screen...

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on 19 May 2009 12:37 PM

JB, you are excellent with drawing skills - especially with folds!

The composition is outstanding too.

With your permission, I'd like to make a couple of suggestions about the color of shadows. Up to you though... stuff based on what I've learned from Richard Schmid...

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j.b2 wrote
on 19 May 2009 2:10 PM

By all means, go ahead...

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on 19 May 2009 2:36 PM

I don't have time right now - have to go make dinner ;-0

But I'll try to find some examples for you - how to make both the lights and the shadows contain more color. Were you working from life or a photo? It's easier to see color if you're working from life, and the type of lighting you use will determine the temperature of all the colors - both in shadow and light.

For example, if you're using a condescent (warm)light bulb, then the lights will be warm and the shadows cool. It's much harder to work with this type of lighting because you have to keep adding white to lighten and then warm it up.

If you work with a cool light - such as north light or a daylight flourescent, then it's easier to paint the lights.  White is the coolest color on your palette and when added to any other color, it cools everything down.  So if your lights are cool and your shadows warm, then it's easier to lighten the cooler light side with white.  Did I make any sense?

The shadows have reflected light - which will also reflect the colors of the objects next to the shadows. Even with a white cloth, both the shadows and the lights are full of color - from the light source and the objects that surround.

OK I really gotta go now... will try to find some visual examples to show you tomorrow. Remind me if I don't reply.

 

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j.b2 wrote
on 21 May 2009 6:30 AM

This one is from life. 99.9% of what I paint or draw is from life. I really don't like working from photos.

Most of the time I use north light. This time the light source was from a day light flourescent bulb. Incadescent bulbs are yellow in my eyes. I have replaced all the light bulbs in the house with the daylight bulbs as they are easier on the eyes especally when I have a migraine. That yellow color they emit when I have a migraine makes me lose lunch. Back to the post, you make perfect sense. I need to etch that statement about light into my brain.. 

I've been out of town for a few days, so here's the reminder call...

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on 21 May 2009 2:55 PM

Hi JB, I need to go up and find one of my oil apple paintings - which I will do if I remember. In the meantime, here is a photo of a flower that Jack Keligian painted from life - Richard Schmid made a few adjustments on it. The thing that Jack does well: All his values are definite colors. Even his grays are colorful.

Painted by Jack Kelegian and Richard Schmid during Putney Painters

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on 21 May 2009 3:20 PM

Here is a still life that I did but it's in Watercolor. It has an apple. OK... I'll shut up now ;-)

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j.b2 wrote
on 22 May 2009 6:42 AM

I think I'm begining to see your point. And now I'm at work thinking about shadows & unification of a painting with color. I can see the color in the shadows of your paintings and am thinking about how to go about this in my next painting. Put it in with pure color, no whites so the shadow remaines warm and thin?

These ideas & all are used to bring the painting to life. Something mine are lacking??

Sorry about all the I's but when deep in thought that's what pop's out when typing...

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on 22 May 2009 6:52 AM

JB, go to richard's website and look over his work.

Don't get discouraged, it's taken me a few years to get the hang of putting color into my work - and making sure it's the right value. As Morgan Weistling says in his video, use "tiles of color".

Here's a suggestion - only use it if you think it pertains to your goals... do little practices of objects instead of a whole painting until it begins to gell. I use inexpensive canvas pads for this. There is also a linen texture pad that I believe is made my Canson. It's paper, but receives oil paint like linen.

The irregular linen surface makes painting more beautiful and when your brush is dragged across the surface - especially with transparent darks, it looks beautiful.

OK... getting off here and enjoying the weekend.  Next week, I'm planning a Friday show and Tell on this forum on "Outside the Studio"... if you figure out anything new, you're welcome to post there.

Have a great weekend and thanks for listening ;-)

Lori

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j.b2 wrote
on 22 May 2009 8:52 AM

I'll give the object studies a try.

I plan on getting some painting done over the weekend..

And I'll look for the "Outside the Studio" post. Have a good weekend!!!

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