Texture Issues

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123456qwert wrote
on 7 Sep 2012 12:11 PM

I've been drawing from life for a couple of months and I've seen a drastic improvement. However, I have one problem. I am horrible at texturing my still lifes. I spend hours making decent looking drawings but when it comes down to texturing my art work starts looking bad. Please tell me about some techniques that will help me improve as a fine artist.

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on 7 Sep 2012 3:03 PM

Shalom

It might depend on what medium you use, I use Acrylic but the same goes for oil, texturing when needed, I do with small pallet knife (or old credit card) on wet paint, adding bit by bit the color I want and softening the shadows as a second layering, there are some good advises in You Tube, just look for it.

Good luck and joy in your painting

s. steiner

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on 7 Sep 2012 3:03 PM

Shalom

It might depend on what medium you use, I use Acrylic but the same goes for oil, texturing when needed, I do with small pallet knife (or old credit card) on wet paint, adding bit by bit the color I want and softening the shadows as a second layering, there are some good advises in You Tube, just look for it.

Good luck and joy in your painting

s. steiner

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123456qwert wrote
on 7 Sep 2012 4:43 PM

I wanted tips for drawing not painting.

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KatPaints wrote
on 7 Sep 2012 6:20 PM

Hi, Maybe you could post an example. It is difficult to play psychic. Generally textures fail in a drawing when the artist overlooks the natural state of things. Textures follow the same rules of perspective, values, scale, etc.

If the texture is too active, it distracts from the overall artwork.

Be certain that your overall texture is the correct value.

Be certain that your texture is the correct scale. The closer up something is in a work, the more detailed you could get. If it is further way, it should be more subtle.

Textures still need to be modeled, having a shadow and highlight area. If they do not, the area will look flat and possible seem wrong to the viewer. Textures still need to follow the form of an object.

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on 8 Sep 2012 10:43 AM

What are you drawing with?  Pencil, Charcoal?  If pencil, do you have different leads to get deeper 'colours'?  You will want to look at pencils in the B range to get darker colours.  Do you have blending tools.  These are pencil-shaped paper tools that you can purchase at your art store, and will blend your colours so that you will have gradation in your work.  Do you have a kneadable eraser?  You can pinch off pieces to form into different shapes, i.e, pointed, that will allow you to lift colour for highlights, and for blending purposes.  Then it is a matter of seeing how you want the form you are drawing to look, does it need to be darker in places.  Do you need to remove colour to make a highlight.  Do you need to tone done the pencil to give more form.  This may help while you are waiting for more suggestions.

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on 8 Sep 2012 11:43 AM

Hi 123456,

You are asking a big question. There are many different techniques you can use to capture interesting textures in drawing.

I suggest that you check out a few good sources. Check "drawing textures with a pencil" on Google. I just checked that and several pages of very good sites came up including a YouTube demo video.

I wonder if by "texture" you mean rendering form with shading in drawing. There are a number of ways to indicate shapes and graded tone. Many of these techniques (rather than simple blending) give you a lot of control over the forms you are drawing. For this type of information look for some basic information on drawing with a pencil. There you will find information on various types of rendering techniques.

Also, be sure you have several types of pencils. I would recommend a H or 2H, HB or F and a 2B —along with a kneaded eraser. That is enough to get you going.

If this isn't close to the information you need, please offer us more specific information.

Good Luck—Paul

http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

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