Painting inventory excess

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gensh wrote
on 27 Aug 2012 1:00 PM

I choose watercolor as my artistic medium.  I have a modicum of success in selling my works, yet because I paint consistently weekly (3-5 paintings a week) I have amassed a rather large numer of unmatted/unframed paintings. 

Business wise my common sense says-" if your inventory is too large sell/sale the excess".  By doing that I hurt my patrons who have purchased at market.  My patron's purchase my paintings regardless the price so that fear is not as big as it could be, and most know they can come to my studio and make me an offer on any of the inventory I have.  This , of course, quashes any gallery representation.  Maybe this is a ggod position to be in???

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on 27 Aug 2012 1:55 PM

You don't have to pay any attention to me but I think I have a suggestion. Slow down.

I don't even know what your stuff looks like—but when you reach the point that you are turning out 3 to 5 paintings a week, you have a good chance to take a few steps to improve your work. Spend more time with the preliminary work—composition sketches, color sketches and drawing. Try more challenging methods and/or subjects. No one cares how much time you spend on a painting. They are interested in what it looks like.

This is not a criticism of you or your work. However, you may be at a point where you can advance the quality of your work by changing the way you work.

Good Luck
Paul

http://www.paulsullivanstudio.com

 

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gensh wrote
on 27 Aug 2012 3:02 PM

Thanks Paul 

 I totally get the planning [preliminary work]. I teach that to my students, you know the 6-P's of management: Prior Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance, thing.  I value sketches, doing 2-4 value sketches before begin my paintings- just to make sure my design is entertaining and that I have my values well placed.  "Challenging" methods intrigues me - do you have some insight in that area?

I've been in this arena long enough to have the skin for it, and I appreciate your candid comments, so don't worry about offending me.  I paint because I love it  and who knows this may be my legacy to my grandchildren and I shouldn't worry about  amassing a large inventory.Smile 

Again, with a warm handshake, thanks

jim

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on 27 Aug 2012 3:06 PM

Jim,

You sound like an old pro to me so give me a little time to get back to you with an intelligent answer.

Paul

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on 28 Aug 2012 11:36 AM

You mentioned that you were completing about three to five paintings a week. I made the off-hand suggestion that you should slow down. What I meant by that was it sounds like you might be in a position where you could take some great strides improving yourself as an artist. I suggested that you might spend more time in the preliminary work or try more challenging methods or subjects. The "challenging methods" sounded interesting to you. I don't know you or your work, so I can't get too specific in suggestions but I can offer a few generalities.

When facing a true professional challenge, we muster all the talent, experience and imagination we have. This kind of awakening is what I am suggesting and it can't help but improve you as an artist. Sometimes the challenge does not have to be monumental. You don't have to change your style or general approach. For instance, if you are usually working with a 15 x 22 half sheet, switch to a full sheet. If you have been working full color, do a couple of monochrome paintings just to sharpen up your values. If you have been doing a lot of landscapes flooded with sunlight switch to an interior scene or cityscape—or put figures in your work. You will have to find the things that will offer you a challenge. 
When we are confronted with things that are different from the usual, we adapt to the situation, drawing upon talent and experience. This is one of the paths to progress for an artist.
As artists, we are all works in progress.
Paul

 

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