oil painting showing bubble wrap marks

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conorg wrote
on 7 Feb 2012 2:34 PM

i have just unwrapped my oil painting which was wrapped in bubblewrap. i thought it was dry enough but obviously it was not and there are faint bubble wrap marks on the painting. it was not varnished and i am wondering does anyone know how to remove the bubble wrap marks without damaging the painting?

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KatPaints wrote
on 7 Feb 2012 5:45 PM

It is difficult to see what the damage is without seeing it.  Did the wrap remove paint? cause indents? Is it superficial effecting the painting being glossy/matte in some areas. Is the painting now dry? How long ago was it painted?  If a light coat of damar varnish is applied (sprayed) do you still see the marks? if so, how?

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conorg wrote
on 7 Feb 2012 6:34 PM

thanks for getting back katpaints. the painting was finished in mid january so it really just got a three weeks drying time and it went transatlantic wrapped in bubble wrap with the flat side facing the painting. you notice it when the light hits it at a certain angle otherwise not so bad. it sounds like you are suggesting a light coat of damar varnish could hide the marks. would that be the case? i am loathe to go at it with some turps and a cloth. Maybe the best thing is let it stay as is and avoid rushing a painting so much in the future. what ya think?

 

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artinmydna wrote
on 9 Mar 2012 2:40 PM

Conorg, Unfortunate that you have this little problem.  I am wondering how the artists on Daily Painting ship the paintings that they sell, assuming that some of them are shipped before they're totally dried.

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KatPaints wrote
on 9 Mar 2012 9:55 PM

If a painting is not completely dry, it is best to cover it with some sort of stiff board or cardboard with spacers on the corners so that the board is not touching the painted surface. Some artists have used small objects like pennies, wood triangles...  secured in the corner. Think pizza box cover with one of those tiny tables that prevents the lid sticking to the pizza.  After that you could  bubble wrap it, but nothing should touch the painting surface.

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artinmydna wrote
on 11 Mar 2012 9:44 PM

Thanks for the Tip, KatPaints!!

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on 25 May 2012 1:22 AM

I have had exactly the same problem, although with paintings which I finished some months before.  I am quite heart-broken to see my paintings damaged through such carelessness, especially as some of these were in the first year's worth of paintings I did, having not painted for 30 years.  They also hung in my very first solo exhibition, in Nepal.  Whatever little worth they might have artistically, emotionally they are priceless to me.  

In my case, I didn't have time to supervise the packing, but the packing company assured me that they had a lot of experience and that I needn't worry.  In some cases they wrapped bubble-wrap directly onto the surface of the paintings and then packed them tightly tougher.  In some cases the pattern of the bubble-wrap has caused clearly seen indentations in the surface of the paint.  

Unless anyone has any magic suggestions I was, in desperation, thinking of placing grease proof paper directly on to the affected paintings and then weighing them down with books or some such, for some weeks.  

Any thoughts anyone?

Very best wishes to everyone,

Mark

Taiwan ROC

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