Know how to achieve this effect?

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pairofjacks wrote
on 12 Jan 2011 4:18 PM

I've been painting for nearly 30 years and always experiment with different medias to come up with unique looks.  I've recently seen an effect that I love but cannot figure out how to achieve this effect.  I know that acrylics are used on canvas but that's about all I can figure out.  I've tried diluting, adding different fluid mediums, using a wet canvas, tried alcohol and numerous other methods.  I may not be using the right mixture or combination though.  If anyone knows how to achieve this look, please share the details.

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Annie Strack wrote
on 15 Jan 2011 2:53 PM

Hard to tell from photsgraphs, but the painting on the top resembles the effects you can get when using watercolor paints on Yupo paper.

The triptych panels on the bottom have a more of a fresco appearance to them, with layers of paint added over layers of plaster or other dimensional substance that has been applied in a stucco-like manner to give it texture.

what ever it is, it sure is lovely!

http://AnnieStrackArt.com

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newcraft wrote
on 11 Feb 2011 7:37 PM

Hi,  I have not been painting nearly as long as you.  Do you mean the light effect on the top picture in yellow.?  I have seen that effect in many abstracts and would also love to know how it is achieved.  If you know how to get that can you please inform.

Thanks much for your help

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KatPaints wrote
on 12 Feb 2011 7:52 AM

There is another post here in which several people replied. The pop of yellow is simple to explain since it is a matter of contrast. the lighter yellow value is set against the darker browns and other cooler colors. Notice the bottom painting is set warm lighter value against cool blue darker values. In the top it transitions from lighter value yellow to darker reds/oranges and then even darker plums which then are beginning to be more cool. For the technique of marbeling/dripping, I suggest finding the other post.

Edit: This is a duplicate thread. To see other Ideas suggestions "... achieve this effect with acrylics" under acrylic.

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WFMartin wrote
on 18 May 2011 4:29 PM

To me, this effect does not appear to be achieved by some operation as random and unpredictable as pouring or dripping.  From the enlarged views of the bottom three paintings, it appears to have quite deliberately "painted on", probably with a painting knife.  The appeal of this seems to be not only with the random-appearing shapes, but also with the color combinations.  One can study and mimic that sort of color harmony.

These paintings appear to me to have been accomplished with thick, impasto strokes (or knife applicatons) of paint, placing the colors and shapes deliberately.

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on 9 Sep 2011 9:24 AM

I don't think many of you will agree with this, but I think the effect was, for the most part, achieved conventionally. Take a look at the right side of the top panel. It looks like a deliberate formation of shapes with thinner paint. In fact, it looks like it could be a clue to what the balance of the top panel may have looked like at the beginning stage.

I think there is glazing all over the place and between layers. Many of the shapes and wandering forms on the upper left look like they are the deliberate result of intentional work—as opposed to the random results of an off-beat technique. The edges in this area and the transition from color to color tend to convince me of this. These are powerful paintings and they have a lot of appeal—but I don't think there are many tricks involved.

Paul Sullivan

 

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KatPaints wrote
on 9 Sep 2011 4:28 PM

This is a duplicate post, so there are several more responses on the other thread. I think there was some agreement with what you said, Paul. There seems to be layering between an intentionally painted ground that transitions from color to color and drippings.

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J.Bars wrote
on 8 Sep 2012 11:32 AM

Hi, Pairofjacks,

Are you still here? If yes, do you want to do some study on this technique together? I am trying to figure out how it's done for quite some time and I did experimented a lot. We can share what we know.

If someone else is interested, please join in.

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Tartaglia wrote
on 12 Sep 2012 11:54 PM

Appear to me like a pour . Although I've seen this effect with different layers of acete or mylar,also with airbrush.

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pairofjacks wrote
on 14 Sep 2012 4:51 PM

I'm still trying to figure out how to achieve this look as well.  I actually reached out to the artist who uses this technique and much like a secret
ingredient in a recipe she wasn't willing to share her technique, which I completely understand.  I did learn that she uses only liquitex products
but that was pretty much all I could learn.  Obviously it is some kind of a pour but I'm still unsure of the method used.  I have tried layering, blowing,
heating and a few other techniques and have gotten some results but nothing that I would really compare to these paintings.  I sort of gave up on
trying to figure it out but I am definitely still interested in figuring out how to achieve this look.  One thing that I was thinking of trying was using the
liquitex inks with some sort of a quick evaporating solvent or possibly even a liquitex flow medium.

 

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J.Bars wrote
on 16 Sep 2012 12:26 PM

I wrote her too, she didn't reply :) Which is normal, she doesn't have to teach anyone.

I think any fluid acrylics are good for this technique. Does Liquitex has fluids? I don't think so. I use Golden. Any way, you can water down heavy or soft body paint. I have never tried inks. Flow medium will have a glossy (too glossy) look. There is also Liqitex Airbrush Medium, which I didn't try yet.

Pairofjacks, would you mind to share a pictures of your experiments? I will send you mine.

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on 3 Jan 2013 1:27 PM

 

the answer is easy if you turn the picture into black and white:

the tone is painted following a specific pattern and in fact quite simple: look for example at the red circles how the volume is created

the tone in the shapes gives volume and provides a foreground/background conventional effect, also the shadows are painted intentionally in other areas. However the edges are left "raw" (hard edges that dried quickly) to give that random effect. Most probably this is acrylic with additives. 

 

regards

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