Begonia with Olive Jar

This post has 6 Replies | 3 Followers
Not Ranked
Posts 37
Points 765
CelesteV3 wrote
on 7 Oct 2008 7:14 PM

So, I'm an acrylics painter, but in the process of learning oils...here's a still life I just did this week in oils.  What's left of my potted plants (that the squirrels haven't managed to eat), is a lovely Tuberous Begonia.  I have a little collection of small teapots and decided to use the little deep olivey green one since it went so well with the tall pot in the back.  Since my walls are a mid-tone grey/green, I set up a soft brick colored cloth to bring together the warm color scheme and work the warm reflections in the teapot and vase.  Actually, it started with a little bowl of red grapes in the lower left but I felt it crowded the scene and took away from the beautiful olive jar in the back.

I do love to paint reflective and shiny surfaces, as well as glass, but cloth is still always a challenge!

It's 12 x 16" on gessoed mdf board (I love this surface!) I'm finding that as I'm learning oils, painting on this surface has freed me mentally from fretting over "ruining" a canvas and having to stop and restretch a new one.  By the way, I'm always learning and welcome C&C!

Celeste Vaught

Website / Blog

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 200 Contributor
Posts 238
Points 3,395
Val Cox wrote
on 7 Oct 2008 8:03 PM

Celeste, You are the first!

I sure enjoy the contrasting color tones and your use of rich muted colors. The pattern and reflections on your ceramic pots are fantastic. For being new to oils, you are off to a great start!

My only critique is the begonia petals seem a little flat, in that they don't appear as delicate or thin as I would have expected. I'm sure others will have some comments and suggestions for you as well! Val

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 37
Points 765
CelesteV3 wrote
on 7 Oct 2008 8:10 PM

Thanks Val - I agree about the petals and may come back to work them once the oils dry a bit.  A lesson learned here was to work that part of the painting to completion as the flower changed quickly!

Celeste Vaught

Website / Blog

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
Posts 1,049
Points 15,060
j.b2 wrote
on 8 Oct 2008 2:20 PM

I agree with Celeste, Flowers are tough.

It can take 3 colors of the the same color to make them work..

I'd hit it again as the rest of the painting is lovely...

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 37
Points 765
CelesteV3 wrote
on 8 Oct 2008 4:56 PM

Yep - I "hit" it again - of course now, 2 days later the flower is very different and I thought maybe showing some of the center now might add some depth and defining detail...still not as thin & delicate as I'd like, but risk overworking if touched more I fear.

Celeste Vaught

Website / Blog

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 200 Contributor
Posts 238
Points 3,395
Val Cox wrote
on 8 Oct 2008 4:58 PM

This looks really good. The flower feels more finished and consistent with the look of the total painting. Nice job! What's your next project? Val

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 37
Points 765
CelesteV3 wrote
on 13 Oct 2008 7:07 PM

Thanks Val - working on a still life now of a different subject altogether.

Celeste Vaught

Website / Blog

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (7 items) | RSS