under painting

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nick-ynysmon wrote
on 13 Nov 2012 11:49 PM

have just this last half hour joined the forum, having stumbled quite by accident on it, looking for info on watercolor brushes.

anyhow, my own thoughts on under painting are these. I try t obtain as much light in my work as I can, we all do...  but one avenue I am thinking of is t under paint the entire canvass in white painting ala prima on raw canvas is nit for me. my ideas are, by using the white surface thus, it will glow through the layer of paint, so long as they are not to thick, and I believe this is  along the lines f the impressionist. another avenue I am thinking if is using white but building my painting up in a wet in wet technique ti again give th dimension of depth and light.

so, any thought in ?????? any critique of what I wrote here????

 

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Jay Babina wrote
on 20 Nov 2012 3:45 PM

Some times I just paint on white, and sometimes I undercoat the canvas or board with a light wash of burnt sienna. I sometimes like the burnt red peaking through the cracks of my painting. The image attached is a plein air oil that was done in about 2.5 hrs and was on a white board but I did the rough drawing with burnt sienna quite thin. You can see the sienna peaking through the painting. This is fairly rough and I often work tighter but you can see the point I'm making about the color peaking through. I did tighten it up a bit at home but didn't have a photo of it since it sold. (I'm lucky)

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nick-ynysmon wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 1:09 AM

nice paining, I've never tried to paint a work in such a short time let none a day, normally three or more weeks.   One severe problem now is the oil  drying, the under painting, winter in the UK is a damp and dreary affair. and not conducive for paint drying.   I am wondering about using acrylic white or similar, to under paint, therefore, I can get the body of the painting underway in hours rather than days.  I  still looking for the best ways to create luminescence in my work, still on the journey so to speak....I don't like the idea f painting ala prima off the plain canvass surface, for me it has to have a background,

 

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Freiwald wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 6:18 AM

I do appreciate the situation you believe your-

self in, however, Nick, I believe the "is it too

humid here" query's essentially a phantom;

there are colors ideal to avoid this.

The two obvious ones, burnt and/or raw umber,

(even thinned somewhat with solvent ) which'll

be dry the next day.

Also, if one must, for some reason, utilize the

slower-drying colors right from the get-go,

there are lightfast driers to facilitate their dry-

ing overnight anyway.

 

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nick-ynysmon wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 6:26 AM

well, maybe I should get my act together!!!  can you suggest please what will enable say light colors, white in particular, lets say I use a pure white underpainting , can you suggests anything? Liquin comes to mind but it is dark, maybe not an issue...

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Jay Babina wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 6:55 AM

That painting was done in Connecticut - US in the summer. I mix my sienna for the drawing with liquin which speeds up the drying enormously, especially on a hot day. I also work around 12 x16 on masonite with three coats of gesso that is sanded on the last coat.  It's fairly absorbent and the thin oil with liquin gets quite absorbed into the gesso. A lot of people who do plein air use alkyd colors for some of the underpainting and sometimes alkyd white.

I also do more studio work too and there I will often block in subtle tones as a back drop for the painting and work up from there as you do. No time constraints but I am impatient and often still mix a alkyd medium in with the paint. Either liquin or Gamblin aklyd medium. I think experimenting with different methods is good because each painting may call for a different approach and you learn what works best for you.

 

We have winter in CT too and you just have to retreat inside which is good too.

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nick-ynysmon wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 7:28 AM

yes, a nice painting all my work to date I take a photo first the transfer to computer and then work from the computer screen

so far I have found thus method excellent, I have  a 21 megpixel camera which gives good definition and I try t take my photos as though each shot was an actual painting itself. I compose the painting so to speak as  take the photo. oit all the photos are good but the method generally  works fine. I am a  very slow painter, Plein air   does not suite me ---as yet at least.

two methods I am looking into is either under paint  using alkyds or using acrylics. have you any thoughts on using acrylics as an under painting? any pros or cons about them?  I have been painting for a number of years but maybe a change of style is not a bad idea....

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ruth meaders wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 8:38 AM

Underpainting is quite important to me. It changes the whole flavor of the finished work. What I use is the original Liquin which is kind of gel-like, to thin the paint. Important:  choose a color that is transparent. I use Burnt Sienna often and yellow ochre as well as Indian yellow. This, along with the Liquin is dry in a matter of hours. Using acrylics for under painting is OK, BUT, they have to be very thin or will crack when oil is applied over them.

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Freiwald wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 9:20 AM

Nick,

Obviously, in an underpainting one desires the 

proper tones not; as a matter of fact, one actually

wants the tones paler, as one will likely glaze 

atop, that way obtaining the true deep tones.

Also, as one will commence the work on a white

(or pale) tone, that alone will make the lights.  

While Liquin will darken and crack (as will any-  

thing added), Liquin or any alkyd resin will ex-

pedite the drying.

f

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nick-ynysmon wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 10:43 AM

Most of my work i light, I paint nature try to capture the freshness the  color. so, assuming I use liquin, what would you suggest as the underpainting,

how would you go about this, I need a new perspective , breaks the old mold so to speak...I appreciate whayt you have sad and find it very helpful, all of you..

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Jay Babina wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 11:01 AM

Unfortunately, there is no one answer to any of this. If I was doing a nature painting, and sun was peaking in between the branches, I might give my canvas a yellow wash. I know a woman friend who actually paints her canvas almost solid cobalt blue because she likes the cool greens and soft distance it creates with mountains. Richard Schmid often tones his canvas with a light brown mix.

If you do a search on the computer there's loads of YouTube videos and articles with examples of what people do like this: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DR-OBX7Kbog

Plus, as I said, you may under paint with one color on one painting and use something else another time. 

You might try entering under painting on the search of this site on top right.

Lastly, how you underpaint is how you want to make your life easier as a painter, but it will not make successful paintings in itself.

 

Good Luck.

 


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nick-ynysmon wrote
on 21 Nov 2012 11:13 AM

well, words of wisdom, Jay, and I agree and  it has opened my thinking quite a bit, hearing other peoples views.  I agree there is no one method and in the end if the work is a success we must have chosen the right methods, I suppose.   thanks for the  information, all of you...I think on my part a little more patience  will go a long way.....

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