Biro pen and ink colors

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 20 Feb 2010 6:21 AM

This is a very colorful Biro or ballpoint pen and ink designed to show the art world how great oil based inks can be. Impressionism and bright colors work hand and hand at producing cherished works of art. Creating beautiful artwork, doing outrages colors and playing with lines really is a blast especially when they turn out like this “Golden Girl” portrait. Having fun or enjoying the powers of color keeps me doing picture similar to this. 

Have a blessed day, Jerry Stith

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Robin11 wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 11:48 AM

I am not at all familiar with this and am intrigued.   Any chance you could post an ultra close up of a portion?

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 10:27 PM

Jerry Stith

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 10:28 PM

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 10:29 PM

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 10:30 PM

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Margo5 wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 10:43 PM

Jerry, these are terrific close-ups showing the details.

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 24 Feb 2010 10:55 PM

Robin, this particular portrait was designed to demonstrate color. The power of color not details. It's also completed on a rough watercolor paper instead of a soft or smooth surface that highlights details. 

The blending will also change when it gets blown up. Please remember that most areas of this picture have been gone over thirty or forty times. That means you're not going to see single lines or strokes. Many layers, colors and directions are combined in order to obtain a smooth picture. A ballpoint pen is much like a crayon, colored pencil, pencil or pastel pencil in my opinion. Start of lightly and go darker as the picture progresses. The paper makes up your white or high lights with ink!

I hope this has helped you Rodin.

Have a blessed day, Jerry

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Robin11 wrote
on 26 Feb 2010 9:55 AM

I still wish I could see a close up that's not a blow up so it's not blurry.  But thanks for the explanation of this unusual medium!~

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 27 Feb 2010 6:37 AM

Margo says, “Jerry, these are terrific close-ups showing the details.”

Robin, I agree with Margo. These enlarged images are close ups in my opinion. I go over the entire picture maybe thirty or more times therefore no individual strokes or lines will show up because of my blending or cross hatching. A ballpoint pen half tone isn’t going to look like a dip pen picture. A ballpoint pen’s half tones produce a hazy effect.

If you use a crayon, pencil, colored pencil or pastel pencil as a blending instrument everything fusses together. A field of color is produced not individual lines. There is no space between each line! That’s what separates a ballpoint pen artwork from a standard woodcutting, engraving, dip pen or tech pen picture. Blending removes separate or individual line work.

Isn’t a close up or enlargement the same thing?

Cheers, Jerry

Jerry Stith

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Margo5 wrote
on 27 Feb 2010 8:15 AM

Jerry, maybe Robin is referring to the distortion of pixels that naturally occurs any time that a photo is blown way up in size. I think she mean that she would like to see a picture that is taken close up to a portion of the original picture.

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on 27 Feb 2010 8:27 AM

Hi Jerry, I'm also intreged by your application with a ball point pen.  Are you refering to a style of a hard rolling ball pen such as a "BIC PEN" or refined as another application as those new "JELL PENS"? For years I've been using Koh-I-noor rapidographs- to illustrate in stippling and cross hatching effects. I'm assuming as you apply the layers of ink with the pen you are stippling each layer? Is the ink transparent as well, thus like a watercolor adding more ink will make it darker? Please let me know.

Also I think to help ROBIN, in this day of digital photos, I may recommend a higher resolution scan, or using the macro zoom[ for close-ups ], to get a tight shot of the actual work. I know it is sometimes difficult because JPEGS on the internet usually run at 72DPI. while zooming in to make it larger will make it a little more blurry. Thanks Jerry, You do such nice work! Andreas

Andreas K. Eldracher / Commercial Artist

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 27 Feb 2010 11:39 AM

Margo, this drawing was completed on textured paper. A scanner looks at a ballpoint pen picture different than a camera. A camera sees the top layers while a scanner might pick up colors beneath the surface. It depends on the scanners adjustments. Commercial copiers do the same thing from my experience.

All the colors are blended, placed on a textured paper and get captured according to a scanner. Any time we convert one medium to another things will often get altered some. My Mother Teresa portrait came out much clearer or sharper than this particular piece. If you take a drawing to a stat shop and have it professionally done on their super size equipment you’ll get the effect that Robin is searching for in my opinion.

Margo, I agreed with you. I thought the enlargement pretty well showed what was going on. I’m not picking on Robin. I’m just trying to clarify the results. I’m sorry my pictures didn’t satisfy her or if she though I was being too picky. (Pixels always get altered at 400% enlargements) I reduced the pixels on my scanner to save space with some other places I'm with. Then I increased them to make this blow up) Its all good!

I hope this helps explain my pictures and words.

Cheers, Jerry

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 27 Feb 2010 11:46 AM

Andreas, you’re right pertaining to JPEG's, pixels and formatting in my opinion. Yes, I’m talking about a bic or regular ballpoint pen. I used dip and tech pens therefore I’ll do a write up for you. I’m pleased you like my oil based ballpoint pen drawings. Andreas, a ballpoint pen is the only pen system to use an oil based ink. Therefore laying down lines, shading, cross hatching or blending plus coloring is different. Please let me return with a comparison or review. Cheers, Jerry

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Jerry Stith wrote
on 27 Feb 2010 1:06 PM

Greetings Andreas, a ballpoint pen always uses an oil based ink system. All other pen delivery systems are water based therefore different by nature. Here’s some information about a ballpoint pen. I’ll now do a pen review or write up….

The inventor of the ballpoint pen was Mr. John J. Load a citizen of the United States, residing at Weymonth, in the county of Norfolk and Common Wealth of Massachusetts, patented the first ballpoint pen. The first patent on a ballpoint pen was issued on 30 October, 1888, to John J Loud, registration No. 392,046.

The pen had a rotating small steel ball bearing. As with modern ballpoint pens, the ball was held in place by a socket. It was fitted with a means for supplying heavy, sticky ink to the ball. The pen proved to be too coarse for letter writing, but it could be used to mark rough surfaces, especially leather. However, the patent was commercially unexploited and another ballpoint pen device was patented by Van Vechten Riesburg in 1916. The patent lapsed without improvement renewal.

Commercial models appeared in 1895, but the first satisfactory model of a ballpoint pen was designed by two Hungarian brothers living in Argentina: Lazlo, a journalist, and George Biro, a chemist. Lazlo noticed that the type of ink used in newspaper printing dried quickly, leaving the paper dry and smudge-free. He decided to create a pen using quick-drying ink instead of India ink. The thicker ink, though, would not flow from an ordinary pen nib and Biro had to devise a new type of point. Lazlo put a tiny metal ball bearing in the tip of a pen, the success of the ballpoint pen is due to the accuracy in which the ball is ground.

Ballpoint Pen virtues!
*Four thousand year pen and ink history
*Most sold art instrument in history
*Longest flowing pen lines in history
*Brightest colored pen inks in history
*Subtlest camera-ready half tone lines in history
*Only oil based pen ink in history
*Strongest pen tips in history
*Best carbon copy producer in history
*Most reliable pen in history
*Produces half tone lines from a full tone ink

Tip sizes:
1. Extra -ultra fine
2. Fine
3. Medium
4. Bold

I shall return.........

Jerry Stith

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