Fried Eggs on the Floor

11 Feb 2013

I had no idea that flipping eggs was such a seriously difficult thing to do. Our third daughter, Tired of Being Youngest, is in culinary school, and this quarter's project involves creating egg dishes of all sorts, with a major emphasis on being able to flip the egg product, spatula free, by synergizing one's wrist movement with the frying pan.

It's one thing dropping fabric from a basket all over the beach; but spattering eggs on the floor is a bit messier. But that's what learning involves -- making mistakes, messing up, and dropping eggs. Brimming Over by Steve Henderson.

It's one thing dropping fabric from a basket all over the beach;
but spattering eggs on the floor is a bit messier. But that's what
learning involves -- making mistakes, messing up, and dropping
eggs. Brimming Over by Steve Henderson.

To this end, Tired of Being Youngest practices with a piece of bread in the frying pan, the latter which she sets on the kitchen counter and picks up every time she walks by.

Flip. Flip. Flip.

I hear this throughout the day and one time, surreptitiously when no one was looking, I picked up the pan and gave a flick of the wrist myself. Thank God there wasn't a real egg in there.

Okay, so maybe you don't eat eggs, and if you do, you're fine using the spatula -- I really only like my eggs scrambled, after all (TOBY is incensed with me -- "Who's going to eat my practice projects?" she asks). But the point of today's article has less to do with culinary techniques as it has to do with the concept of practicing:

To get good at anything, from flipping eggs to perfecting oil painting techniques to creating complete artworks, takes practice, practice, and practice, and sometimes, that practice doesn't involve real eggs, but a slice of bread.

Translation: paint a lot, but not necessarily with the idea of selling everything you paint. Some of those works are practice pieces, and when you look at the finished product, you feel that you have literally splattered eggs about. But you keep at it -- flipping, flipping, flipping -- and you get better and better, until one day -- that fried egg goes soaring into the air, gracefully pirouettes, and lands, cleanly, in the middle of the pan.

--Carolyn


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Comments

lginn8510 wrote
on 16 Feb 2013 8:32 AM

I love  this painting.  It's free, it's flowing and makes a statement.

Rkforbes wrote
on 16 Feb 2013 10:16 AM

I love your painting!

Rkforbes wrote
on 16 Feb 2013 10:16 AM

I love your painting!

Reruho wrote
on 16 Feb 2013 7:00 PM

Carolyn,

I have to agree with you completely about practicing. When I first started painting, I soon figured out that if I wanted to improve it would take practice and not a once a week lesson. I made a decision to paint daily. Each day for several weeks,  after I took my daughter to school I would return home to paint.  I was quite impressed with my improvement and how much easier it made learning new things weekly. I painted a lot of crappy stuff but I learned something from each crappy painting. I also learned to be more adventurous in my painting and I became more willing to experiment with color and subject matter.

Reta