Just What Is a Consultation, Anyway?

When my Norwegian Artist, Steve Henderson, gives an oil painting workshop, one of his favorite aspects — as well as that of his students — is when participants bring in their artwork for Steve to look at and make comments about.

"I could spend an entire workshop doing this," he's told me. "We both get so much out of it."

It's a balancing act -- asking for feedback and accepting it -- but if you do the dance right, you'll learn some valuable new moves. Grace by Steve Henderson.

It's a balancing act — asking for feedback and accepting it.
But if you do the dance right, you'll learn some valuable
new moves. Grace by Steve Henderson.

When you find a fine art oil painting artist and arrange a consultation concerning your artwork, you are essentially looking for what Steve does in the workshop: you show the artist your work and he tells you where it's good, where it's not so good, what your strengths are, and where you could use some improvement.

This isn't necessarily easy to listen to — and even as you listen to it you must be aware that it is the opinion of one person — but if you check your ego in at the door and you've done your homework in choosing the artist to review your work, you can find incredible benefit in a consultation that analyzes your oil painting technique and narrative approach.

Thanks to modern technology, you and the artist do not have to be in the same town. You simply e-mail images to the artist (do, do, do take good photos), and he or she gets back to you via e-mail, instant messaging, phone, or Skype. The latter three can be in "real time," but even e-mail can be done on the spot if the two of you make an appointment to write back and forth.

One session of reviewing two to 10 of your works will give you a different perspective, some ideas on where to go next, and an outsider's dispassionate view. Not a bad return on the investment.

–Carolyn

 

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