Getting a Second Opinion That Counts

Friends and family are wonderful, but when it comes to getting an honest, straightforward statement from them about what your fine art oil painting really, really looks like — well, they're just so incredibly . . . nice. And nice doesn't help, in this case.

Friends and family are just terrific people, but they're not always the best resources when we want an honest, impartial opinion on our art. Dandelions by Steve Henderson.

Friends and family are just terrific people, but they're not always the
best resources when we want an honest, impartial opinion on our art.
Dandelions by Steve Henderson.

If you've read the art instruction books on oil painting techniques and watched the learn how to paint videos and taken the classes and chatted in the forums and you're still wondering where to go with your art technique, maybe it's time to talk to another artist.

In earlier articles we discussed the option of taking lessons from another artist — one whose work is something that you're reaching for yourselves — but another option on the table is an art consultation, in which you send a number or works to your artist of choice, he or she reviews them, and then you listen, or read, while he/she gives you feedback.

Thank to the Internet, e-mail, and Skype, you can connect with an artist who lives clear across the country, or even the ocean, from where you do.

The first thing to do when setting up an art consultation with an artist is discovering if he or she offers this service in the first place. If there's a website, check it out; if the artist doesn't mention the service but you really like what he does and want his opinion on what you do, then use the 'contact' form — most websites have them — to ask the artist directly.

If the artist is offended by your effrontery, then this is probably not someone you want to work with. But it's highly likely that he or she won't be, and you know, you'll never know whether you ask.

More on this next time.

–Carolyn

 

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