Affording Private Art Lessons

When Steve, the Norwegian Artist, was a young boy, his parents sought out a local artist in his town and arranged painting instruction lessons — people do this all the time with the piano, and yet when it comes to art, it seems so . . . impossible. But it's not. It all starts with finding an artist whose work you admire and asking the person for lessons — which you, definitely, plan to pay for.

"I'll never be able to afford this," you moan.

Well, maybe, if the artist you're looking at is on the A-List of artists whose names are instantly recognized, and they're famous and all that.

Sometimes, you just need a little guidance to straighten out your thoughts, or your hat. Beachside Diversions by Steve Henderson.

Sometimes, you just need a little guidance to straighten out your
thoughts, or your hat. Beachside Diversions by Steve Henderson.

But there are plenty of truly excellent artists whose names aren't in the magazines, and the way you find these people is by wandering through your local galleries, or strolling around on the Internet, until you find someone whose art you like.

If the person is local, you can call or e-mail them and ask if they offer oil painting lessons. If they're across the country, don't despair, because it is possible to give and take lessons over the Internet — we ourselves offer this option, receiving images of your work via e-mail, and then communicating back with you via e-mail, phone, or — our favorite — Skype.

And it's not like you're a kid again, signed up for years of endless piano lessons — you may need one half-hour lesson to get you going, or you may want to set something up once a month for a year — be up front with your artist of choice and see what the two of you can work out.

Either way, sometimes a little push is all you need, and a session, or two or three or four, with an artist who is producing work that you keep coming back to look at can make a tremendous difference in what you do the next time you stand at your easel.

–Carolyn

 

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9 thoughts on “Affording Private Art Lessons

  1. I did not start painting until I retired. My wife gave my painting supplies because I enjoyed watching artists on TV. I had never thought of painting myself. To get started I found an artist in a nearby town and it all began. Now, 25 years later, painting it a big part of my life. I am no master but I sure enjoy mixing paint and pushing it around the canvas. Artists are available, look for them.

  2. A small class is a great way to go. It costs less than private lessons and you benefit from watching other work. Look for a teacher that will individualize the class as much as possible rather than a “paint along”. You don’t just want to learn how to follow a teachers instructions, you wan to learn how to do it yourself.

  3. Dear sir
    How can I find quality artists who give private lessons on the web ?and see their styles first to find out if I like the way they paint .
    Frank Holmes

  4. Frank — Jbqdqg and anitapencil have good tips — shopping for an art teacher is like looking for a music teacher — you want a fit of personality and style. Increasingly, more artists are offering their options online, as do we, as I mentioned in the article. You can find Steve’s style and art lesson information at our website, http://www.stevehendersonfineart.com.

  5. Reguarding my finding an artist for lessons. It was not as easy as it may have sounded in my first comment. First I found one in my town but that did not workout. It was 25 years ago so I don’t remember all the details but I found the right one on line and took a chanch that worked out for me. The thing is to keep working at it.. I looked in Art Supply stores where sometimes they allow people toput up notices. Also asked the clerks there. Eventually got a good one online.

  6. I found my information at an art store as well. I connected with the woman that owns a studio and have taken some group lessons as well as some workshops from some master painters thru this connection. There may also be an art league in your area that will expose you to local artists.

  7. I found my information at an art store as well. I connected with the woman that owns a studio and have taken some group lessons as well as some workshops from some master painters thru this connection. There may also be an art league in your area that will expose you to local artists.

  8. I found my information at an art store as well. I connected with the woman that owns a studio and have taken some group lessons as well as some workshops from some master painters thru this connection. There may also be an art league in your area that will expose you to local artists.

  9. Small classes are great for moving through the basics and becoming pretty good.
    But private lessons with an artist you like will bring your technique to a professional level. Small Atelier art schools are amazing, sometimes they run sat, nights and summer school. It will push you to new levels.
    To find an artist try taking a class at local art store, they usally have local artists in for workshops. You can see if you like the teaching style.

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