Entering an Art Show: Following the Submission Process Is Important, Too

3 Sep 2012

Following the submission process, exactly, when you send your portfolio to a gallery is crucial, be it emailing your website or sending off a package for consideration. The same attention to detail applies when you enter an art show or group oil painting exhibition.

When there are a lot of boats in the harbor, it helps when everyone pays attention to what they're doing and maintains some sense of order. In any juried art show accepting submissions, there are a lot of boats in the harbor. Harbor Faire by Steve Henderson. Courtesy Steve Henderson Fine Art.

When there are a lot of boats in the harbor, it helps when everyone pays attention to what they're doing and maintains some sense of order. In any juried art show accepting submissions, there are a lot of boats in the harbor. Harbor Faire by Steve Henderson. Courtesy Steve Henderson Fine Art.

If the show that you are entering requires you to go through a designated application site, like Juried Art Services, for example, the software program itself will stop you if you download the wrong size of image or neglect to fill out the required Artist Statement section or use too many words to describe your work. As irritating as it is to argue with the computer over entry issues, it's a relief to know that, once you've completed the entry process to the application site's satisfaction, you're done, and you haven't forgotten anything.

If you are not using an application site, then it's important to read the show's prospectus carefully and, one by one, check off what is asked for and what you have provided.

I generally enclose a cover letter with all submissions that we mail in, and one of the positive by-products of this is that I double confirm that I have completely fulfilled the requirements.

"Dear Selection Committee:" I write, or something to that effect, "Enclosed please find the following:

1)      The signed and completed entry form

2)      A CD disc with 3 images of artwork

3)      A check for a specified amount (don't forget this one)

And so on, checking and re-checking that I've included what I say I do, reconfirming with the prospectus that every requirement listed is met.

As with galleries, exhibition staff are swamped with entries, and while they may not outright reject your submission because you forget an artist statement, they will no doubt feel a moment of irritation toward you, and that's something that is good to avoid.

--Carolyn


Filed under: ,
Related Posts
+ Add a comment