Want a Portfolio-Ready Painting?

14 Sep 2011

Cast drawing and painting is a tried and true method of learning how to draw in a classical manner. It forces a student to acquire new perceptual and conceptual skills in order to complete the given task at hand. Normally, the process takes several months of slow, carefully measured steps. The results are usually pretty striking and satisfactory.

But my question to you is, what if you don't have a few months? What if you have less that two months to get together a portfolio for college?

At Teaching Studios, we help students who are working under a tight deadline to get several pieces together for a portfolio, for college or otherwise. With paintings and drawings that are of high quality despite being produced in a short amount of time.

One of them, we call Rapid Fire Cast Painting. Here's a step-by-step breakdown to illustrate the concept that was done by one of our Brooklyn-based students. The lesson took six hours. Others take less, some take longer. I'd welcome the chance to answer any questions about the demo and our Portfolio Development / Classical Drawing and Painting Program. Let me know what you think,

Rob
info@teachingstudios.com

 

Student Exercise: One Day Rapid Fire Cast Painting
The block-in stage. The cast is simply divided into linear shapes, using vine charcoal directly onto canvas. Shadows and light shapes carry equal weight.
The block-in stage. The cast is simply divided into linear shapes,
using vine charcoal directly on canvas. Shadows and light
shapes carry equal weight.
An acrylic wash of earth red is applied.
An acrylic wash of earth red is applied.
Four value stage. The student then mixes up a four value scale of dark, transition, light and highlight. Then the student applies those values where present on the cast.
Four value stage. The student then mixes up a four value scale
of dark, transition, light and highlight. Then the student applies
those values where present on the cast.
Eight value stage. Further refining the painting, the student mixes up
four more intermediary values and applies them between the four values
already present. This results in smoother, more sophisticated
transitions and a great fundamentals piece for a painting portfolio.


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Comments

on 17 Sep 2011 4:52 PM

Dear Rob;

I like the result you have gotten here, and well as the steps you go through to get to the end result.

But I think we need to distinguish what the student is trying to achieve in copying Bargue or any other cast drawing. Yours here is to create a portfolio piece, and nicely done. That doesn't substitute for the painstaking copying of a cast drawing over hours and days, learning to precisely see and draw angles and proportion, and ultimately values. Like so many things, as an artist there is so much to learn, isn't there! Judith St. Ledger-Roty