Drawing Basics: Chat With Dan Gheno

Dan Gheno drawing the human figure. Read the transcript from our online chat with top artist-instructor Dan Gheno. If you have more thoughts to share, chat with your peers on Artists' Forum, and check back for more online chats with featured artists. This chat was brought to you by Caran d'Ache. Gheno explained the many aspects of drawing the human figure that are discussed in the latest issue of American Artist Drawing Highlights.

2007-04-12 12:00:35.0
Administrator: You have joined a chat with Dan Gheno, a top artist-instructor whose articles appear in the latest issue of American Artist Drawing Highlights. Feel free to ask him some questions and to join in the discussion.

2007-04-12 12:00:53.0
Dan Gheno: Hi. I'm in the chat room. Any questions?

2007-04-12 12:02:45.0
NE: Do you have any advice on drawing a nose when it's in a 3/4 view?

2007-04-12 12:03:03.0
Dan Gheno: Think of the big planes that make up the nose. It has a front, side and bottom plane, almost like a wedge. When you look at it from a 3/4 view, you need to remember that you are viewing it from off to one side, not the front. Don't draw it as if the far edge of the nose runs flush with the centerline of the face. The nose lifts off of the face. Remember that there is more space between the nose and the ear on the near side of the face, and very little of the far side of the face showing in a 3/4 view. Nothing ruins a great 3/4 nose than making the far side of the face too big!

2007-04-12 12:03:21.0
Tenacious B: How do you choose what kind of paper to use?

2007-04-12 12:03:46.0
Dan Gheno: I like to use Utrecht Sketch, 50-lbs bond paper.

2007-04-12 12:04:08.0
Dan Gheno: I also like to use Strathmore Artagain paper. That's the paper I used for most of my toned drawings in the Highlights issue.

2007-04-12 12:03:30.0
Dan Gheno: Hmmm.

2007-04-12 12:03:34.0
Jo A. Slaight: I'm unable to work with a live model at this time, what is your opinion about software such as "Virtual Pose"?

2007-04-12 12:04:48.0
Dan Gheno: Jo A, Is that 3-D software?

2007-04-12 12:05:04.0
Jo A. Slaight: Yes

2007-04-12 12:06:27.0
Jo A. Slaight: Actual male & female models; can be turned at all angles/ up & down

2007-04-12 12:06:39.0
Dan Gheno: Jo, it's better than nothing, and it's probably better than flat photographs. I often use photos to resolve drawing issues, for instance, when I am trying to figure out how to visual the figure in action.

2007-04-12 12:08:29.0
Dan Gheno: Anybody have any questions?

2007-04-12 12:08:41.0
NE: Yeah, I have another:

2007-04-12 12:09:05.0
NE: What other artists do you recommend studying for inspiration?

2007-04-12 12:10:57.0
Dan Gheno: NE, there are many. Some of my favorites include Michelangelo, Rubens, and Ingres, and I was heavily influenced by comic-book artists in my early life. I learned a lot about anatomy from them. How to visualize the figure in space and tell a story.

2007-04-12 12:11:22.0
Dan Gheno: As I grew older I gravitated toward the fine artists. I became very interested in Kathe Kollwitz and Rico LeBrun.

2007-04-12 12:10:02.0
Jenny: Any advice for drawing noses?

2007-04-12 12:10:37.0
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2007-04-12 12:10:43.0
jane: I would expect that a knowledge of anatomy would be useful in drawing the human figure, is it important?

2007-04-12 12:12:37.0
Dan Gheno: Jane, yes, knowledge of anatomy is very important. I recommend buying anatomy books–there are many good ones to choose from.

2007-04-12 12:13:01.0
Dan Gheno: Besides anatomy books, you should probably pick up a cheap skeleton.

2007-04-12 12:13:08.0
jane: Thank You.

2007-04-12 12:12:32.0
Tenacious B: When drawing the whole figure, how do you keep the figure from running off the page?

2007-04-12 12:13:42.0
Dan Gheno: Put tic marks at the top of the page, the bottom and in the center. Then try to hold rigorously to these guideposts as you get further into the drawing.

2007-04-12 12:14:01.0
Dan Gheno: There will always be the temptation to fudge a little here and there— But don't do it! Before you know it, your feet will run off the page, Tenacious.

2007-04-12 12:14:42.0
jane: Are they're not general rules about height vs size of head?

2007-04-12 12:15:14.0
Dan Gheno: Jane, are you referring to the relationship of the head to the body?

2007-04-12 12:15:21.0
jane: Yes.

2007-04-12 12:15:42.0
jane: Like 7 heads high??

2007-04-12 12:15:49.0
Dan Gheno: There are certain averages that you can refer to. In general, the average figure is about 7 1/2 to 8 heads tall.

2007-04-12 12:16:28.0
Dan Gheno: But you should really trust your eye. These measurements are just a starting point. They help you to judge whether you are way off and need to doublecheck your measurements.

2007-04-12 12:16:46.0
jane: Yes, that is what i was wondering about. Thanks.

2007-04-12 12:18:18.0
Lenarta: I imagine that would mean for a figure in standing or lying position but most models are seated, or in some way composed to reduce the height. In that case, what is a good rule to follow?

2007-04-12 12:19:12.0
Dan Gheno: Lenarta, you definitely have to trust your eye in those cases. Use whatever part of the head that you can see as a unit of measurement and then compare that unit to the other parts of the body.

2007-04-12 12:19:39.0
Lenarta: Thank you

2007-04-12 12:18:31.0
Nancy R: I have a hard time getting the proportions right when I'm looking at a model at an angle to me. I never seem to get the proportional size right, so the figure looks distorted, rather than foreshortened.

2007-04-12 12:20:43.0
Dan Gheno: Nancy, you have to work with the distortions. If you are extremely close to the model, it's natural that some parts of the figure will seem unnaturally large, but visually, that's how they look to your eye.

2007-04-12 12:21:10.0
Dan Gheno: You also have to consider the natural viewing angle of your eye.

2007-04-12 12:21:30.0
Dan Gheno: That is, your eye can only see so much before it has to move up or down.

2007-04-12 12:22:11.0
Dan Gheno: If you don't want a lot of distortion to get in your work you have to move farther away from the model so you can see the part of the model you are drawing without moving your eye.

2007-04-12 12:22:37.0
Nancy R: So, are you saying to be careful not to go beyond that visual boundary? Thanks. That helps.

2007-04-12 12:23:10.0
Dan Gheno: Nancy, if you are referring to your field of vision, yes.

2007-04-12 12:18:47.0
Jo A. Slaight: When you begin drawing the figure, do you contour draw, or do you block in the shape/mass?

2007-04-12 12:19:20.0
Lenarta: That's one I would like to know also, Jo A

2007-04-12 12:20:23.0
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2007-04-12 12:23:28.0
Dan Gheno: Jo, I do both at the same time.

2007-04-12 12:24:17.0
Dan Gheno: After consider the outside contours of the figure, I then consider the inside third line. That is literally where the light ends and the shadow begins, called the terminator.

2007-04-12 12:24:55.0
Dan Gheno: At first, I just lay in the terminator, and then later fill it in with tone. Try to make the terminator line light enough so it melts into the overall tone, Jo.

2007-04-12 12:26:00.0
Jo A. Slaight: Wow! That's helpful, because I can see contours… I see shapes and mass

2007-04-12 12:23:43.0
jane: Are the rules different when drawing children?

2007-04-12 12:26:02.0
Dan Gheno: Jane, no. The average head size is bigger relative to the body, but as in all cases you must trust your eye. Notice also that in a child, their cranial mass (above the eyes) is much bigger than their facial mass.

2007-04-12 12:26:10.0
Lenarta: That helps me a lot. I haven't drawn the human figure as yet – I have been too frightened of it. The terminator makes so much sense and helps me to have a direction to move in systematically.

2007-04-12 12:26:19.0
BeautifulArt: Do you have any tips for drawing expressive hands?

2007-04-12 12:27:17.0
Dan Gheno: B.A., hands are really difficult, but I've found that I can get much greater control over them after spending a lot of time drawing from my skeleton and drawing the expressive hands of artists I admire, in particular Kathe Kollwitz.

2007-04-12 12:29:19.0
Dan Gheno: B.A., some good source material for drawing hands: Burne Hogarth's “Dynamic Hands,” George Bridgman's “100 Hands.”

2007-04-12 12:29:55.0
Dan Gheno: I learned a lot from certain comic book artists. Gil Kane, for instance.

2007-04-12 12:23:12.0
NE: When drawing a head, must you start with a grid? I know it's important to trust your eyes, but should a measuring tool be utilized?

2007-04-12 12:30:42.0
Dan Gheno: NE, I try to avoid using any grids. That can hold you back and make you create stiff drawings.

2007-04-12 12:31:16.0
Dan Gheno: Trust your eye…I sound like a broken record, but it's true.

2007-04-12 12:31:45.0
Dan Gheno: In general there's a good way to start to draw the head. Divide the features into thirds. The top third runs from the hairline to the eyebrows.

2007-04-12 12:32:06.0
Dan Gheno: The middle third from the eyebrows to the base of the nose. The last third from the base of the nose to the chin.

2007-04-12 12:32:33.0
Dan Gheno: Then compare all of these segments to each other. Which is the biggest? Which is the smallest? That's where you'll find the likeness.

2007-04-12 12:31:44.0
Barbara: You draw with such feeling in your work. There is a difference among drawings that are straightforward, literal drawings of the figure vs. emotional, lyrical drawings that draw emotion from the viewer. What are some techniques one can cultivate to create a drawing that is more emotional, and stirring?

2007-04-12 12:33:59.0
Dan Gheno: Barbara, I try not to be too conscious of trying to pull the emotion out of me as I draw. I try to let it come out naturally.

2007-04-12 12:35:14.0
Dan Gheno: This is a really hard question…the figure sometimes serves as a tool for metaphor. So when I look at the figure, and observe its shapes, I allow that figure to draw the emotion out of me.

2007-04-12 12:26:37.0
Tenacious B: I see you draw with colored pencils sometime. Is there a specific reason why you would use them over, say, charcoal or Conte?

2007-04-12 12:36:37.0
Dan Gheno: Tenacious, I used to draw with nothing but charcoal and carbon pencils— I still draw with those materials on occasion. But I find the colored lines, whether created by chalk, grease or wax-based pencils, more exciting— I like the greater variety of line "depth" that you can get with a colored media.

2007-04-12 12:37:28.0
Dan Gheno: You can get extremely fine and delicate lines when you want them, and when you press harder, you can get a heavier, bolder line quality reinforced by the stronger, chromatic effect that happens when the line is more saturated with color. Then, if you really press hard, going over the line or value shape a couple of times, you can get a burnished like effect. This effect doesn't reproduce very well. I first noticed the burnished effect, when I drew a copy from the original drawing that Michelangelo did of the Lybian Sybil.

2007-04-12 12:36:42.0
Barbara: What about line and shadow techniques to help with the emotional aspect of drawing?
2007-04-12 12:38:01.0

Dan Gheno: Barbara, Kathe Kollwitz is a prime example of a person who used value and tone to enhance the emotional quality of her work.

2007-04-12 12:38:21.0
Dan Gheno: You can especially see it in her series of etchings in which she is clutching her dead son.
2007-04-12 12:39:02.0

Dan Gheno: There seems to be a heaviness to the way she used the tone that corresponds to the emotion impact of the scene. To me it's one of the most powerful images in all of art.

2007-04-12 12:40:31.0
Administrator: New questions are welcome.

2007-04-12 12:32:01.0
Jenny: Do you have a favorite type or brand of pencil? Do certain pencils work best with certain papers?

2007-04-12 12:41:44.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, I favor colored pencils for more delicate drawings. For more expressive drawings I am partial to carbon pencils.

2007-04-12 12:42:11.0
Dan Gheno: Chalk and grease/sanguine pencils also for more expressive drawings.

2007-04-12 12:42:55.0
Tenacious B: I notice that some of your lines follow the form and sometimes they don't. What do you base your decision upon?

2007-04-12 12:43:36.0
Dan Gheno: Tenacious, A lot of it is instinctual… But I consciously try NOT to to let my lines go at right angles to each other like a tic-tac-toe grid, and I try to keep the linework subservient to the value effect. Fancy linework does nothing for the drawing if all you can see is the calligraphy.

2007-04-12 12:43:18.0
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2007-04-12 12:43:31.0
Alli: What is your training, Dan? Besides the comic-book influence are you primarily self-taught?

2007-04-12 12:45:11.0
Dan Gheno: Alli, no, I've had a lot of very good teachers. I studied at the Santa Barbara Art Institute in the early ‘70s with people such as Priscilla Bender-Shore, Douglas Parshall, *** Phipps, Ralph Gilbert, and Gerry Haggerty.

2007-04-12 12:46:40.0
Dan Gheno: In NYC in the late '70s, I studied at the Art Students League and the National Academy with Harvey Dinnerstein, Mary Beth MacKenzie, Ron Sherr, Ted Jacobs, David Leffel, Terence Coyle…I know I am missing some really important people.

2007-04-12 12:48:28.0
Jo A. Slaight: David Leffel!!

2007-04-12 12:43:42.0
Jenny: Any advice for drawing shoulders when arms are raised over the head?

2007-04-12 12:48:30.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, notice how it affects the torso as the arms go up above the shoulder, stretching the pectoralis up with them, and in the back, pulling the bottom of the shoulder blades upward.
2007-04-12 12:48:37.0

2007-04-12 12:44:05.0
BeautifulArt: Sorry, back to hands. Can you please comment on the strength of the lines and tone with creating expression in hands. Is that a good idea, or should one stick to fine detail lines and let the form carry the emotion?

2007-04-12 12:49:26.0
Dan Gheno: B.A., you can definitely use lines to reinforce the emotional impact of hands–especially foreshortened hands.

2007-04-12 12:50:06.0
Dan Gheno: Try to keep the lines closer to you darker and more focused. Also, you can accentuate the bony forms with bolder lines.

2007-04-12 12:46:14.0
Terry M: Hi Dan, it's Terry. I'm asking a question for Elaine, who can't get on. "I would like to know if your approach to doing a finished drawing is different than what you would do if executing a preparatory drawing for a painting.”

2007-04-12 12:51:30.0
Dan Gheno: Terry/Elaine, I have different motives when doing a stand-alone drawing as opposed to when I do a preparatory drawing for a painting. My prep drawings tend to be looser and more expressive.

2007-04-12 12:52:19.0
Dan Gheno: I'm merely trying to work out the compositional ideas with these sketches. I try to leave most of the hard drawing work for the painting itself so i can maintain an excitement of discovery as I paint.

2007-04-12 12:52:42.0
Dan Gheno: For a stand-alone drawing, I like to revel sometimes in the observation of form or the abstract shapes of the figure.

2007-04-12 12:53:11.0
Dan Gheno: So I spend a lot more time working out values and analyzing proportions.

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2007-04-12 12:51:55.0
Jenny: If a person is lying down where is the center of gravity?

2007-04-12 12:54:18.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, all across the base where the figure is touching the support (sofa, base, floor, etc)

2007-04-12 12:56:03.0
Jenny: Do you find it more complicated to draw older bodies vs. younger bodies and do you take a different approach?

2007-04-12 12:56:37.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, good question. All body types are equally difficult and interesting.

2007-04-12 12:57:57.0
Dan Gheno: I have a great deal of interest in older bodies. They have more severe plane changes. In thinner bodies the bone structure is more apparent and I can use that structure to create more emotional and expressive impact.

2007-04-12 12:58:26.0
Dan Gheno: For younger bodies muscular tone is more defined.

2007-04-12 12:57:56.0
BeautifulArt: Following Jenny's train of thought here, do you enhance character lines or tend to soften or downplay them unless they are the focus of the piece?

2007-04-12 12:58:53.0
Dan Gheno: What do you mean by character lines?

2007-04-12 12:59:17.0
BeautifulArt: I am thinking of expression lines, furrows, facial features.

2007-04-12 12:59:39.0
Dan Gheno: B.A., I don't enhance or downplay them.

2007-04-12 12:59:50.0
Dan Gheno: They are pretty expressive on their own.

2007-04-12 13:00:27.0
Jenny: Is that also true with muscles and lines in bodies? Do you ever exaggerate?

2007-04-12 13:01:45.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, another good question. I try not to exaggerate the muscle forms. They are usually strong enough on their own. But then there are times when I am entranced by the rhythmic movement of the figure. In those times, I often manipulate the muscle forms to conform to a more rhythmic structure.

2007-04-12 13:02:10.0
Thom: Do you find that Michelangelo and the artists of his time to be on the mark with the exactness in their work?

2007-04-12 13:02:28.0
Dan Gheno: Thom, they tended to exaggerate.

2007-04-12 13:02:42.0
Dan Gheno: That's one of the things I like about their work.

2007-04-12 13:02:43.0
Jenny: Even the David?

2007-04-12 13:02:55.0
Thom: I thought so.

2007-04-12 13:03:28.0
Dan Gheno: Yes, David is exaggerated. It had to be because of the perspective from which people view it.

2007-04-12 13:02:16.0
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2007-04-12 13:04:38.0
Lenarta: Do you ever use subtractive techniques? Have you ever used 3D, as in sculpting?

2007-04-12 13:05:30.0
Dan Gheno: Lenarta, are you talking about sculpture or 2D work?

2007-04-12 13:05:40.0
Lenarta: both

2007-04-12 13:06:36.0
Dan Gheno: When I sculpted I used clay. Regarding 2D, sometimes I lay a tone across the whole paper and then wipe out with a kneaded eraser or a chamois.

2007-04-12 13:07:01.0
Lenarta: That's what I was interested in.

2007-04-12 13:06:55.0
Flake Whyte: Hi Dan, Thank you for answering my question which Terry posted for me. I would also like to ask the following, You mention keeping an anatomy book with you while drawing the figure. Do you recommend a particular one? Thanks, Elaine

2007-04-12 13:07:41.0
Dan Gheno: Whyte, regarding a portable anatomy book, there is the book by Farris and the book by Wolfe.

2007-04-12 13:07:04.0
Jenny: It's very interesting how use negative space in your drawings. It actually adds to the depth of your drawings. How do you advise using this technique?

2007-04-12 13:08:44.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, negative space is very useful. From a compositional point of view, it is almost as important as the positive shape of the figure itself.

2007-04-12 13:09:31.0
Dan Gheno: But you have to be careful that you don't change the proportions of the figure and make them look unnaturally wide or thin to conform to your idea of what the negative space should be.

2007-04-12 13:09:42.0
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2007-04-12 13:11:02.0
Jenny: Is seems that most of your drawings are done below eye level. Is that so?

2007-04-12 13:11:06.0
Dan Gheno: Getting back to positive/negative shapes, if your motives are primarily abstract or expressive, you should feel free to alter or manipulate the positive shapes.

2007-04-12 13:13:12.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, a lot of them are, yes. I have a bad back so i usually sit while drawing. In general it's a good idea to stand while drawing so you can back up from your drawing to get a more objective look at your proportions. If you sit too close to your drawings, it's hard to perceive whether your proportions are correct because you can only see a small part of the paper at one time.

2007-04-12 13:12:48.0
Lenarta: When you were sculpting, did you find that it added new dimensions to your ensuing drawing?

2007-04-12 13:13:57.0
Dan Gheno: Lenarta, definitely. It's very important to sculpt from the human figure–it helps you gain a 3-D understanding of what your eye is perceiving.

2007-04-12 13:15:16.0
Lenarta: That is exciting!

2007-04-12 13:15:20.0
Dan Gheno: It should be an important part of your early training.

2007-04-12 13:15:34.0
Dan Gheno: If not all throughout your life.

2007-04-12 13:16:04.0
Lenarta: What do you recommend as a medium for my beginning sculpting?

2007-04-12 13:16:15.0
Dan Gheno: Clay.

2007-04-12 13:16:59.0
Kelly: Dan, who has been the most influential artist that has inspired you?

2007-04-12 13:18:08.0
Dan Gheno: Kelly, I guess that has to be Michelangelo. It was after seeing the movie The Agony and the Ecstasy that I decided I definitely had to become an artist, and I had to redouble my efforts to improve my drawing abilities.

2007-04-12 13:18:30.0
Alli: How old were you when you saw that movie?

2007-04-12 13:18:53.0
Dan Gheno: Alli, I was pretty young…I can't remember. Probably around 10.

2007-04-12 13:17:38.0
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2007-04-12 13:19:01.0
Jo A. Slaight: Dan, what size paper & what drawing tool/s do you recommend for the new figure (live model) student?

2007-04-12 13:19:52.0
Dan Gheno: Jo, don't draw too small. Try working with an 18-x-24 pad. I prefer my students use bond paper. It is relatively cheap and it doesn't degrade over time like newsprint.

2007-04-12 13:20:23.0
Dan Gheno: Jo, as for drawing tools, you should use what you feel comfortable with, starting out.

2007-04-12 13:20:49.0
Dan Gheno: That includes graphite, colored pencil, charcoal and carbon.

2007-04-12 13:21:02.0
Dan Gheno: I would stay away from Conte at first. It is very difficult to erase.

2007-04-12 13:20:33.0
Jenny: Dan, is it more challenging for you to capture the movement of a figure clothed?

2007-04-12 13:22:12.0
Dan Gheno: Jenny, compared to drawing a nude figure? No. In fact, it's even easier. You can use the stress lines and fold patterns of the drapery to enhance the rhythmic movements of the figure.

2007-04-12 13:21:51.0
Lenarta: Should the eraser be used to any extent when beginning to draw from live model?

2007-04-12 13:22:37.0
Dan Gheno: Lenarta, yes the eraser is an important tool. Don't think of it as a cop-out.

2007-04-12 13:22:52.0
Lenarta: I had thought that it was.

2007-04-12 13:23:18.0
Dan Gheno: You need to get sometthing down on the paper and then after time, you can rearrange and re-proportion your drawing with bolder and darker lines, and then erase the earlier sketch lines.

2007-04-12 13:23:13.0
Flake Whyte: Dan, do you find that your new students tend not to keep their pencils properly sharpened?

2007-04-12 13:24:29.0
Dan Gheno: Whyte, this is an interesting question. It is very important to keep your pencils sharp. Five or 10 minutes spent sharpening your pencils saves you a lot of time in the long run.

2007-04-12 13:25:25.0
Dan Gheno: A dull pencil makes for a dull drawing. You lose precious time and momentum if you have to stop in the middle of a drawing and sharpen up new pencils. So to answer your question, yes.

2007-04-12 13:23:26.0
Lenarta: Is gesture drawing something that I should spend time doing as a beginner?

2007-04-12 13:26:10.0
Dan Gheno: Lenarta, I try to do a little bit of gesture drawing every day. I use it to exercise my sense of proportions.

2007-04-12 13:26:24.0
Dan Gheno: Last few minutes, any more questions?

2007-04-12 13:26:50.0
Jo A. Slaight: Do you have a website?

2007-04-12 13:27:08.0
Dan Gheno: yes, www.dangheno.net. Thanks for asking!

2007-04-12 13:27:13.0
Jenny: Do you teach workshops or have videos?

2007-04-12 13:27:43.0
Dan Gheno: No, I teach at the Art Students League of New York and the National Academy, also in NYC.

2007-04-12 13:28:01.0
ugo: Hello, I always listened that drawing by natural is better than take a photo like model. What do you tell us about this?

2007-04-12 13:28:36.0
Dan Gheno: Ugo, yes, natural is better.

2007-04-12 13:27:24.0
Lenarta: This is a tech question – I missed the first portion of the chat – is there a site where I can find the entire body of this chat
?
2007-04-12 13:28:46.0
Administrator: The chat room is going to close, but feel free to keep chatting on the Forum. Be sure to check out Dan Gheno’s articles in Drawing Highlights, available in our online store http://www.interweave.com/art/ You can also access the online store through www.myamericanartist.com Thanks Dan!

2007-04-12 13:29:09.0
Dan Gheno: Thanks everyone.

2007-04-12 13:29:12.0
Administrator: The chat room is going to close, but feel free to keep chatting on the Forum. Be sure to check out Dan Gheno’s articles in Drawing Highlights, available in our online store http://www.interweave.com/art/ You can also access the online store through www.myamericanartist.com Thanks Dan!

2007-04-12 13:29:15.0
Jo A. Slaight: thanks

2007-04-12 13:29:17.0
Administrator: The chat room is going to close, but feel free to keep chatting on the Forum. Be sure to check out Dan Gheno’s articles in Drawing Highlights, available in our online store http://www.interweave.com/art/You can also access the online store through www.myamericanartist.comThanks Dan!

2007-04-12 13:29:21.0
Lenarta: Aloha!

2007-04-12 13:29:29.0
Barbara: Thanks Dan, Barbara

2007-04-12 13:29:30.0
Jenny: Thank you.

2007-04-12 13:29:43.0
Administrator: The chat room is going to close, but feel free to keep chatting on the Forum. Be sure to check out Dan Gheno’s articles in Drawing Highlights, available in our online store http://www.interweave.com/art/You can also access the online store through www.myamericanartist.comThanks Dan!

2007-04-12 13:29:44.0
Alli: Thanks Dan (will you sign my copy of Drawing Highlights?)

2007-04-12 13:29:56.0
NE: Thank you Dan!

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