Drawing Side by Side, But Never the Same

6 Feb 2013

The more I think about and experiment with drawing techniques, the more I understand the extraordinary range of opportunity that drawing offers the artist, whether the drawing is intended as a preliminary sketch to a painting or a drawing in its own right, or the opportunity to experiment with a new skill or practice an old one.

The artist of this drawing also cropped the composition tighter, yet another difference between the two drawings seen here.
The artist of this drawing also cropped the
composition tighter, yet another difference
between the two drawings seen here.
What is also fascinating is seeing how artists represent the same image, differently, each in their own style or method of working. Of course, drawing art requires work--real effort--but fortunately can be done somewhat discretely or, for example, at "open studio" sessions held in many art schools or even galleries in many communities. There really is no excuse not to engage in life drawing, at least from time to time. All that said, I regret to having to admit that I spotted the two drawings shown here hanging on a wall after they were completed. I was not there drawing myself when they were created.

A drawing from a recent "Open Studio" event at Studio Incamminati.
A drawing from a recent "Open Studio"
event at Studio Incamminati.
The two drawings here were done at a Studio Incamminati "Open Studio," both from the same model and a fellow artist. You will notice that the drawings are different in numerous ways. One artist chose a white paper with no toning, and the other toned a greyish paper with charcoal. One artist looks to have used a bit of white chalk as a drawing medium or let the white of the drawing surface show through, and the other achieved lights by pulling off the tone that was initially applied to the paper. The underlying paper became the "light" though it was grey not white. Both artists used hatching and smudging, but in very different ways.

The two artists were in a similar position around the model--perhaps even next to each other--at an angle that gave them a roughly profile or three-quarters view of the model. Yet even side by side, these two artists created two very different drawings. If we had more drawings from that day, I expect we would see even more different choices and drawing techniques as each artist exercised his or her personal vision through their art. Isn't that wonderful!!

--Judith

 


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on 9 Feb 2013 5:18 AM

I have 4 painting/drawing buddies that regular attend not just one but two open drawing sessions a week. If find the practice invaluable. We each approach the model in very different ways with very different results.  If you like I can send the 4 images of the same model to this post.   Can I upload images?

on 9 Feb 2013 5:19 AM

I am not able to download the e-books.  Can you give advice as to what I am doing wrong?  It just comes up as a little symbol and I ca'n't ope.