Will You Join Me in This Black Hole?

20 Jul 2014

Female Nude, Seen From the Back by Jacob Jordaens, ca. 1640, chalk drawing, 10 x 8. Collection National Gallery of Scotland.
Female Nude, Seen From the Back
by Jacob Jordaens, ca. 1640, chalk drawing, 10 x 8.
Collection National Gallery of Scotland.
The Drawing Blog on Artist Daily is like a black hole for me. I just get sucked in and click around and read what catches my eye and all of a sudden I realize an hour (or more!) has passed. I invite you to join me in this black hole—it is way more fun than being in a real black hole, I promise—and check out a few of my favorite Drawing Blog entries.

I've always been intimidated by long-pose drawing because it just seemed like it offered me more time to mess up a semi-decent drawing. I feel as if I simply wouldn't stop working on it and find a comfortable place to call it done. Dan Gheno offers the antidote to this anxiety with his strategies on how to keep a long-pose drawing energetic and alive.

I've rarely taken the time to look at Ingres' drawings, so Mark Mitchell's blog on the artist was a revelation, especially the fact that Ingres was known for his "miraculous" line work and his ability to use contour in an extraordinary way. Reading through this solidified my own commitment to line as opposed to a more volumetric approach to drawing.

The Coen Brothers shoot scenes that adhere very closely to J. Todd Anderson’s storyboard drawings, as this pair showing the artist’s storyboard and a still from the Coen Brothers’ film No Country for Old Men shows.
The Coen Brothers shoot scenes that adhere very closely
to J. Todd Anderson’s storyboard drawings, as this pair
showing the artist’s storyboard and a still from the Coen
Brothers’ film No Country for Old Men shows.
And being a little drama queen at heart, I'm always up for incorporating a little spice or mystery into the art. Linda Price does just this by offering a behind-the-scenes look at how the Coen Brothers work with a storyboard artist to plan and execute every scene in their movies, including Raising Arizona and No Country for Old Men. It was such a fascinating read from the artist about what this work is like.

There are so many interesting areas of drawing that I'm eager to learn more about, whether it is discovering new draftsmen whose work I admire, discovering how to facilitate a breakthrough in my own drawings with insightful instruction, or how to draw different features of the human body. But the source of all this top-level information stays the same: Drawing magazine. It is the one publication that I can never see myself doing without, both as a huge fan of works on paper and as someone who wants to have a committed drawing practice. I hope you find your digital subscription (or print subscription) to Drawing magazine is the same for you.  Enjoy!  

 


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