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  • Repairing canvas

    Q: I was working on a painting one day when my cats knocked my easel over. The canvas now has a tiny hole in it as well as some dented areas. Can I repair the canvas? A: There is hope for your damaged canvas. Lascaux produces a product called Welding...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
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  • Types of prints

    Q: Please explain the difference between prints, lithographs, and commercial art prints? A: Prints or Giclée: Prints are copies of original artwork. Some prints are archival because they have been printed on archival watercolor paper or canvas...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
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  • Priming wood for painting

    Q: I plan on painting on wood with oil paints. I sealed the panel with polyurethane, but do I have to apply gesso over the polyurethane? Would shellac be a good alternative to polyurethane? If so, would I need to apply anything over the shellac? Can I...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Oil drying time

    Q: Can I varnish my oil painting as soon as it is dry to the touch? I use a medium made of Damar medium, linseed oil, and turpentine, and have finished a commission that needs to go to the client in one week. Would it be better to not varnish? A: An oil...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
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  • Dry mounting watercolors

    Q: Will I damage my watercolor on 140-lbs. paper if I dry mount it? A: It will not injure the colors. The reason watercolors are rarely mounted is that dry mounting makes it very difficult to remove or repair the watercolor later. If you do dry mount...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Preserving colors

    Q: How can I preserve the color in an autumn leaf I am incorporating into my artwork? A: Unfortunately, the coloring agents in a fall leaf are very much fugitive. Carotene (yellow), chlorophyll (green), xanthophyll (fall yellow), and erythrophyll (red...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Warped stretchers

    Q: I thought I stretched my oil paintings well, but they quickly warped. What did I do wrong? A: If you hung your paintings on an exterior wall, then they probably were affected by humidity and temperature changes from outdoors. One solution for this...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Pinholes in canvas weave

    Q: I held my stretched, single-primed canvas up to the light and could see tiny pinholes allowing light to shine through. Is this normal? Should I use double-primed canvas? A: It is normal, but if it makes you feel better to use double-primed canvas ...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Velvety appearance

    Q: Dark parts of my painting, in certain lighting, looks like velvet--they seem shiny in some areas, and matte in others. What happened? A: If all your brushstrokes run in the same direction, this effect would be avoided. You also could switch to alkyd...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Wrapping acrylics

    Q: Can I tightly wrap acrylic paintings in heavy-gauge polyethylene wrap and store them? A: This is ill-advised because 1) water vapor will build up, condense, and cause damage to the paint surface, 2) slight heat or pressure will eventually make the...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Moldy gouache

    Q: I stored my gouache paints in small plastic containers with covers, but they molded. What can I do to prevent this? A: You can refrigerate them. You can let them dry out and wet them again before use. Or you can add a very small amount of fungicide...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Watercolor whites

    Q: I don’t know which white to use in my watercolors. How do you choose the right white? A: Many traditional watercolorists will say the only white that should appear in a watercolor painting is the color of the paper—either untouched by the...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
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  • Acrylic pigments

    Q: What is the difference between artist and student grade acrylics? A: Fine artists acrylics use high quality, finely ground and milled pigments, chosen for lightfastness and clarity of color as well as mixing qualities. They also have more resin solids...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • Illustration board surfaces

    Q: What is the difference between a plate and a vellum surface on illustration board? A: These terms are used with Bristol board, but not illustration board. A plate surface is roughly equivalent to the surface texture of hot-pressed paper, while a vellum...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
  • "New" gamboge

    Q: What is the difference between the color “gamboge” and the color “new gamboges”? What about “ultramarine” and “French ultramarine”? A: Gamboge is a fugitive color made from a gum or resin harvested from...

    Posted to Ask the Experts by Karyn on 24 Feb 2009
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