Gain Artistic Momentum by Competing and Exhibiting

3 Oct 2013

Lana, 2004, charcoal drawing, 24 x 18. Collection John and Penelope Adams.  By Casey Baugh.
Lana, 2004, charcoal drawing, 24 x 18.
Collection John and Penelope Adams. 
All works by Casey Baugh.
Pivotal moments in my life have often—to take a line from Ernest Hemingway—come "gradually, then suddenly." Nothing appears to be on the horizon, but then a few things fall into place, then a few more, and suddenly I'm in a whole new situation. It's often the same for artists who begin showing their work publicly. Prior to that, they may have been working in their studios and occasionally showing their art to family and friends, but entering work in competitions or showing as part of an exhibition can cause people to take notice in the best of ways.

Little Ben 2004, charcoal drawing, 20 x 16, by Casey Baugh.
Little Ben
2004, charcoal drawing, 20 x 16,
by Casey Baugh.
Casey Baugh pursued web design in Georgia before he relocated to Massachusetts and began studying with artist Richard Schmid. In 2005, Baugh won the Drawing magazine Cover Competition. In 2008, he was a finalist in the American Artist Cover Competition, and in that same year he was the subject of a feature article in Workshop magazine. Since then, Baugh has received numerous accolades, chosen a gallery to represent him, and he continues to pursue and perfect his artistic process.

Baugh's approach to drawing is loose, with forms appearing almost incidentally from abstracted backgrounds. With charcoal, he supplants the drawing of line with establishing realistic tone. He also stretches himself to manipulate the medium in unexpected ways. "I push it to create effects that serve my vision," he says. "I don't limit my tools to the common charcoal pencil and eraser-instead, I seek new ways of putting on the charcoal."

Pursuing one's artistic practice isn't about the attention that it garners though the positive momentum an artist receives from an audience, editors and critics, and fellow artists can help that artist make significant strides in his or her craft and career. To get yourself and your art ready for this kind of significant step, you need to be strongly inspired to make work, which is where the free online magazine, Inspired, comes in. It is inspiration and art-instruction resource in one, so you can sharpen your drawing skills, brush up on traditional painting methods, and discover artistic innovations that you won't find anywhere else. Enjoy!


Related Posts
+ Add a comment