Let SFMOMA Text Art to You

Send Me SFMOMA gives you the opportunity to text it pretty much anything and get art back.
Send Me SFMOMA gives you the opportunity to text it pretty much anything and get art from the museum’s collection sent back to you.

 

Send Me SFMOMA Puts Their Art Into Your Hands

Art and tech coming together is a beautiful thing. Send Me SFMOMA is the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s answer to a bummer of reality. Only 5% of their collection is ever on view at any given time.

To show it all they would need to build 17 other museums. You would need to walk more than 120 miles to see all of their 34,678 works placed side by side.

Send a mouse emoji and get Claes Oldenburg back.
Send a mouse emoji and get Claes Oldenburg back.

Text the museum and get art back

Now the museum’s entire collection is simply a text away. All you need to do is text SFMOMA at 572-51 with a “send me” message. Send me storms, send me green, send me puppies.

You can even replace a word with an emoji as I did above. You’ll get a picture of a piece of art from the museum’s collection riffing on your request sent back to you. Send me a crystal ball and a Walker Evans print appears.

Even Neil Patrick Harris is doing it

The text service has been in testing since March, kicked off officially in June but has gone viral in recent weeks. Neil Patrick Harris tweeting about the program to his millions of followers last week also didn’t hurt in helping Send Me get a big lift.

The best part

The greatest thing about Send Me SFMOMA is that it puts art on your everyday radar. You are bored, killing time, looking for something to make you smile, make you think, surprise you. Art can deliver.

Thanks to SFMOMA and creative technologist for the museum Jay Mollica for showing that tech and art coming together is a beautiful thing. And that art can meet you wherever you are.

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Courtney Jordan

About Courtney Jordan

  Courtney is the editor of Artist Daily. For her, art is one of life’s essentials and a career mainstay. She’s pursued academic studies of the Old Masters of Spain and Italy as well as museum curatorial experience, writing and reporting on arts and culture as a magazine staffer, and acquiring and editing architecture and cultural history books. She hopes to recommit herself to more studio time, too, working in mixed media.   

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