10 Ways to Tell You Are a Painter

How to Spot a Painting Artist

How to Spot a Painter | Painting Artist | Artist Dauky

Painters, no matter what they paint, are united in a love for creating. Painting makes our days better and gives us an incredible outlet for capturing the way we see the world.

There are definitely tell-tale signs that mark us as painters, too. Here are 10 ways to tell if you are a painter.

It’s by no means a complete list, but see which of these define you. And, be sure to leave a comment below telling us what we missed!

1. You wouldn’t hesitate to say to someone, “Can you turn for me? I think your three-quarter pose could be perfect for a portrait.”

2. When you are sitting in front of your easel looking at your work, you aren’t just “sitting.” You are contemplating; planning; absorbing. It really is totally different.

How to Spot a Painter | Painting Artist | Paint Brushes | Artist Supplies | Artist Daily

3. You know there is only one rule about brushes: more.

4. Weird things happen when you don’t get to paint. Like your child’s PB&J turns into open-face landscape sandwich with jelly clouds.

5. You would consider asking your mother to pose as Venus.

6. You are immune to being chided at museums for getting too close to the art. “I was just trying to see if the painter used Burnt Sienna or Alizarin Crimson.”

7. You don’t buy chic, paint-splattered jeans. You make them.

8. You know there is only one rule about tubes of paint: more.

9. Your cat is named Duchamp. Your dog is Salvador. But you couldn’t convince your partner to name your child Rembrandt. But what about Rem? No. Or Brandt? Still no.

How to spot a painting artist.

10. You carry pencils, pens and brushes with you, always. Because you never know when inspiration will strike.

What Numbers Match You?

For me, I’m 2, 3, 7 and 10 all the way! Add your take in the comments below.

And, don’t forget the 11th way to spot painters: They have their digital download of Masters of Realism so they can absorb all the insights about the artists they love and the painting techniques they aspire to wherever they go.

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Courtney Jordan

About Courtney Jordan

  Courtney is the editor of Artist Daily. For her, art is one of life’s essentials and a career mainstay. She’s pursued academic studies of the Old Masters of Spain and Italy as well as museum curatorial experience, writing and reporting on arts and culture as a magazine staffer, and acquiring and editing architecture and cultural history books. She hopes to recommit herself to more studio time, too, working in mixed media.   

14 thoughts on “10 Ways to Tell You Are a Painter

  1. Number 6 to a degree. I try to figure out how the artist created his/her grey – combining Burnt Sienna with Ultramarine Blue or a different combination. I’m a watercolorist.

  2. I’m 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10.
    Sometimes inspiration comes in my dreams. I get up and I have to draw a sketch or start working on that idea.
    I DIY everything which needs painting or sculpturing skills just for fun and because I can do it.
    A real painter spots amateurs when they use brushes badly – it is so annoying when they destroying a good brush or any kind of good quality equipment.

    1. I can relate. I dream in terms of abstracts, and sometimes the yearning for a paintbrush in my hand is almost physical pain. The DYI is SO strong in me. Surprise! I LIKE forging new frontiers of DYI.

      I relate to almost all of the topics, and your need to get up and paint or draw out a sketch. Sometimes they are great but other times the next day I look at them and say, “What was I THINKING??”

  3. When water washable oils leave you puzzled as to whether you should thin with water or with oil and how “fat over lean” applies. (I think the imprimatura should be thinned with water.)

  4. please note that #6 has a subset: when you zoom in close to the painting at the gallery and THEN veer to the side, so the light hits skewed on the canvas, and THEN you can see the brushstrokes better….

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