June 2010

SPECIAL REPORT Explore New Creative Ideas With Acrylics; Learn From Sorolla’s Epic Masterpiece; Increase the Drama in Pastel Paintings; How to Plan & Improve Your Watercolors

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On the Cover:
Portrait of the Artist
Louis Comfort Tiffany  (detail)

by Joaquín Sorolla, 1909, oil, 21 1⁄4 x 25 1⁄4.
Courtesy the Hispanic Society of America,
New York, New York.



Paint With Watercolors as if You Were
Assembling a Puzzle

FEATURES

Acrylic Special Section: Exploring Versatile Acrylic Paints & Mediums
by M. Stephen Doherty
Teachers, professional artists, and students associated with the Rye Arts Center, in New York, sampled a wide range of colors and formulations of acrylic paints and mediums. In the process, they discovered materials that expanded their creative opportunities.

Acrylic Special Section: 5 Acrylic Artists Share Methods, Materials, and Techniques
by Karyn Meyer-Berthel 

Making All the Rule in Acrylic
by Allison Malafronte
Whether she’s painting on the beaches of Orange County or on her 1,200-acre ranch in the valley, California plein air painter Marcia Burtt takes advantage of the freeing, expressive qualities of acrylic to design her own adventure through the art-making process.

The Shining Example of Sorolla
by  Bob Bahr
Modern painters can benefit from studying Joaquín Sorolla, a master of depicting light and the figure. The reinstallation of his monumental painting series Vision of Spain, at the Hispanic Society of America, in Manhattan, offers a chance to revisit the accomplished oil painter.  

Paint With Watercolors as if You Were Assembling a Puzzle
by  M. Stephen Doherty
Chicago artist Andrea Vincent devotes a great deal of time to evaluating the colors, shapes, and key elements of a subject to determine the best way to paint it with layers of transparent watercolor.

Creating Drama From the Commonplace
by Linda S. Price
Her subjects may be everyday items, but pastelist Diane Rudnick Mann effectively uses them to create drama in her meticulously rendered still life paintings.

Getting to the Truth of a Subject
by  M. Stephen Doherty
For Nancy MacDonald, the decision whether to work with oil or pastel, and how to handle those painting materials, depends on what she believes is the truth about her observations.

 



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